Stanford online writing courses – please do my homework

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Writing in the Sciences -Self-Paced

ABOUT THIS COURSE

Welcome to the self-paced version of Writing in the Sciences! The course is organized into 8 learning units. We anticipate that each unit will take about 2 to 6 hours to complete. After completing all 8 units, you will take a multiple-choice final exam. For those trying to earn a Statement of Accomplishment, your final grade will be based on: quizzes (20%); Unit 1-3 homework assignments (40%); and a multiple-choice final exam (40%). You will have two attempts on quiz questions, but just one attempt on homework and exam questions. online biology course To earn a Statement of Accomplishment, you must score at least 60% in the course. To earn a Statement with distinction, you must score 90% or better. You can monitor your cumulative grade in the course by clicking on the Progress menu.

This course teaches scientists to become more effective writers, using practical examples and exercises. Topics include: principles of good writing, tricks for writing faster and with less anxiety, the format of a scientific manuscript, and issues in publication and peer review. Participants from non-science disciplines can benefit from the training provided in the first four units (on general principles of effective writing).

COURSE FORMAT

In the first four units, we will review principles of effective writing, examples of good and bad writing, and tips for making the writing process easier. In the last four units, we will examine issues specific to scientific writing, including: authorship, peer review, the format of an original manuscript, and communicating science for lay audiences.

Throughout the course, participants will watch video lectures and complete quizzes, editing exercises, and a final exam. There are also 2 optional writing excercises. Participants who opt to do these assignments will have a chance to submit two short papers, edit and provide feedback to other participants who have submitted the papers, and receive feedback on their submissions.

COURSE SYLLABUS

Unit 1 – Introduction; principles of effective writing (cutting unnecessary clutter)

Unit 2 – Principles of effective writing (verbs)

Unit 3 – Crafting better sentences and paragraphs

Unit 4 – Organization; and streamlining the writing process

Unit 5 – The format of an original manuscript

Unit 6 – Reviews, commentaries, and opinion pieces; and the publication process

Unit 7 – Issues in scientific writing (plagiarism, authorship, ghostwriting, reproducible research)

Unit 8 – How to do a peer review; and how to communicate with the lay public

PREREQUISITES

The course has no prerequisites other than fluency in English.

Will I get a Statement of Accomplishment?

Yes, participants who score at least 60 percent will pass the course and receive a Statement of Accomplishment.

Participants who score at least 90 percent will receive a Statement of Accomplishment with distinction.

How much of a time commitment will this course be?

The course consists of 8 units and each unit will take approximately 4 – 8 hours to complete, but you can work through all of the material at your own pace and on your own schedule. There are no due dates for any of the assignments.

Any additional textbooks/software required?

There is no textbook for this course. Participants who would like additional reading may enjoy:

– On Writing Well, William Zinsser

– The Elements of Style, Strunk and White

– Sin and Syntax, Constance Hale

– Essentials of Writing Biomedical Research Papers, Mimi Zeiger

– Science and Society: An Anthology for Readers and Writers, eds: Nelson-McDermott, LePan, Buzzard

– We recommend taking this course on a standard computer using Google Chrome as the internet browser. We are not yet optimized for mobile devices.

Can I get CME credit for this course?

This free version of the course does not offer CME credits, but there is a fee-based CME version available as well. diploma online Go to the Stanford online CME course page for more information. You are welcome to take this free version of the course before the CME course, but note that you will still need to create an account on the CME site, pay the registration fee, and complete the CME Pre-test, Post-test, Evaluation Survey, and Activity Completion Attestation statement in order to receive your credits.

Course logo image adapted from one of Nic McPhee’s photos on flickr. Used under a Creative Commons license.

Online Certificate in Novel Writing

The Online Writing Program at Stanford Continuing Studies, which offers dynamic courses in every genre, also hosts the Certificate Program in Novel Writing. The Certificate Program builds on the success and excellent teaching of our regular online writing courses with the goal of providing a structured environment in which you can write your novel.

Enrollment: Application and Fee Apply

Have you always wanted to write a book? The Online Certificate Program in Novel Writing is designed to help you fulfill that dream.

About the Course

We’ve created a seven-course program that will show you the path from first glimmer to full manuscript. You’ll start with the habit of the art, move through a series of targeted workshops, produce a book-length manuscript (or at least a good part of one), and review that manuscript in a one-on-one tutorial with an accomplished fiction writer. Our instructors are all accomplished authors, mostly drawn from Stanford’s prestigious Stegner Fellows.

Join Our Open Learning Community.

We Offer On-Campus and Online Courses in:

Stanford Continuing Studies welcomes all adult members of the community—working, retired, or somewhere in between. Take courses for pleasure, personal enrichment, or professional development.

CURRENT QUARTER

Spring registration now open. Most classes begin the week of April 2.

COURSE HIGHLIGHTS

Featured Spring Courses:

The Life Art Science Technology (LAST) Festival

Stanford LASER (Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous)

Medieval Matters: Investigating Medieval History with Science

An Evening with Rebecca Skloot and Members of the Lacks Family

This Spring, select Continuing Studies courses will be Berry-eligible for employees participating in Stanford's BeWell program. LEARN MORE

This month, we celebrate with Online Creative Writing Program instructor Joshua Mohr, who just sold a memoir that he is currently writing to Farrar, Straus and Giroux. LEARN MORE

Watch Continuing Studies public events on iTunes U. LEARN MORE

©2018 – Stanford University – All Rights Reserved

ONLINE COURSES FAQS and TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS

What is an online course?

An online course is a course in which learning and student participation takes place over the Internet. Through an online platform called Canvas, students connect to an environment that includes weekly lessons and assignments, as well as discussion boards and optional video meetings so students can interact with each other and with the instructor.

Who are the instructors?

The instructors for Continuing Studies Online Courses are often the same lecturers who teach traditional Continuing Studies courses held on the Stanford campus. They are all experts in their field and experienced teachers.

What is a typical online course like? And how will I interact with classmates and instructors?

In a typical course, students get a series of weekly lessons that include components such as carefully selected readings, video lectures by the instructor, discussion points, and assignments. Using online discussion boards and optional video meetings, students receive feedback from the instructor, as well as have substantive discussion with their peers about the materials and themes of the course.

How long is each course?

Online courses vary in length; some will correspond to the traditional ten weeks of Stanford's quarter system, while others will adopt a five or six-week format.

What kind of time commitment is required?

On average, each course requires at least four to six hours a week. This includes weekly readings, completing assignments, watching video lectures, and participating in online class discussions.

How often will the class meet online? Are there designated times to participate online?

The courses are asynchronous so you can log in and participate in the class whenever it's convenient for you. certifications online However, there's one exception: Instructors schedule a video meeting at a specified time during the week. It is not mandatory that students participate in the video sessions. However, this is a good time to ask questions and interact directly with the instructor.

What are the prerequisites for taking a course?

There are no prerequisites for the courses currently being offered. All the courses require is a healthy curiosity about the subject of the course, and a willingness to participate in the class discussions!

Must I be a graduate of Stanford in order to take a course?

No, these courses are open to the general public, regardless of where you live. However, students must hold a high school diploma, or the equivalent, in order to register. No special visas are necessary for international students.

Do I need to purchase course materials?

Yes. After you register for a course, you will receive a list of the required texts, including ISBN numbers, along with links to online vendors where the texts can be purchased. Even if you already own a particular book, we ask that you ensure that you have the same edition as your classmates to facilitate page referencing, reading assignments, and discussion.

Are the courses graded?

Students will have three grading options. The online courses can be taken for 1) a letter grade, 2) credit/no credit, or 3) no grade. Please visit the Credits & Grades page for more details about choosing the grading option that’s right for you.

Can I earn a degree or credit toward a degree from this course?

Stanford Continuing Studies courses can be taken for a grade and credit, but that credit cannot be applied toward a Stanford degree. It may be possible to apply that credit toward a degree program at another college or university, depending on that institution's academic policies.

Can I receive a proof of completion for my course?

Proof of completion can only be provided if a student takes a course for Credit or a Letter grade. Upon request, Stanford Continuing Studies can provide students with either official or unofficial transcripts listing all completed Continuing Studies courses. The first five (5) transcripts are provided free of charge. online computer courses Transcript requests must be received in writing. Please see the Continuing Studies Transcripts page for more details on transcripts.

What is your refund policy?

In order to be granted a full tuition refund, students must drop the course online or by emailing the Continuing Studies office, by 5:00 pm on the first Thursday of the course. A 50% refund is available if you drop the course by 5:00 pm on the Tuesday of week 2. The registration fee and any applicable course fees are non-refundable. You may sign into your Student Login to drop a course and receive an automatic refund. Faxes (650-725-4248) and emails are also accepted.

How do I register for an online course?

You can register for an online course the same way you would register for any Stanford Continuing Studies course. Visit our Registration page for full details.

If my course does not begin for several weeks, do I need to enroll now?

No. You can enroll at any time before the course begins. However, please be aware that many Continuing Studies courses fill to capacity well before the start date, so early registration is encouraged.

What kind of computer equipment do I need in order to take an online course?

Operating Systems: Windows 7 and newer, Mac OSX 10.6 and newer, Linux – chromeOS.

Browsers: You must update to the newest version of whatever browser you are using. We recommend using Chrome, Firefox or Safari, beta versions of browsers are not supported and Internet Explorer is problematic. chemistry online courses Please make sure that your web browser has JavaScript and cookies enabled.

Who should I contact if I have additional questions?

Please email continuingstudies@stanford.edu or call (650) 725-2650 with any questions.

©2018 – Stanford University – All Rights Reserved

Writing Certificate

THE WRITER'S SPOTLIGHT

The Online Creative Writing Program is nearing the end of its first decade, running more than fifteen courses each quarter, including our two-year Online Certificate Program in Novel Writing. This space will aim the spotlight on the talented alumni and faculty of our courses, featuring news of recent successes, opportunities for networking and publishing, short personal essays and interviews relevant to all aspects of the writing life. If you have a piece of news or know of an opportunity you'd like to share with our community, please email: continuingstudies@stanford.edu.

MARCH 2018

This month, we celebrate with Online Creative Writing Program instructor Joshua Mohr, who just sold a memoir that he is currently writing to Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Josh is the author of numerous novels and one previous memoir, and he teaches both nonfiction and fiction. I wanted to take this opportunity to talk to him about why he writes in both forms, and to hear more about the new “real-time” memoir, what that means and what it looks like on the page.

Online Writing Lead Instructor

Malena Watrous: As a novelist and memoirist, which form do you prefer – or find yourself returning to?

Josh has generously offered to share a page of his “real-time” memoir, so that we might get a taste of this experimental genre in which he is working:

“I’d want you to leave me,” I said. “I’d want you to get her as far away from the blast site as possible, assuming that’s an option.”

“Your loyalty needs to be to her, to protecting her.”

“Then you have to leave me, too.”

We were two spouses. Two people who loved one another. We were two people who had been together for twelve years. We were two people who couldn’t even imagine living without the other one around. And yet, if a nuclear bomb was dropped, we made a promise to abandon each other. It was one of the most romantic moments of my life.

“I’d leave you to die alone,” I basically said to her.

“I’ll leave you too,” she said back. “You might be instantaneously incinerated. Or you might die of radiation exposure within the first week. Or that initial shockwave would have left your body badly burned, and some topical infection will end you. Or be slowly poisoned by the air, fallout radiation, cancer—you’ll live in the rubble and hunt for food alone and die a painful tumor death, just like your dad, except you’ll be utterly alone, screaming into the concrete ruins of our lives.”

It was a prewar love story.

And we meant it. We mean it.

If we have to, we will desert each other, forsake the other to a hateful fate. And it would be the right thing to do. Ava will never know that we love her so much that we’d leave the other to die in merciless ways. And for the one of us who hopefully survives with her—for the one who escapes the blast, moves north, say, into Canada—the survivor will find a flower blooming and will lean down and say to Ava, “Smell this,” and she will, and the survivor will find a glass of ice cold lemonade and say, “Taste this,” and she will, smiling at the tang. And the survivor will draw Ava a warm bath and say, “Touch the water, sweetie,” and she’ll crawl in, floating on her back, her blonde hair haloed out around her head. And the survivor will say, “Listen to this,” and will whistle one of the songs from the Moana soundtrack, and Ava, who has recently learned to whistle as well, will join in. And the survivor will say, “Look at this,” and show Ava an old picture when our family had three people, and the survivor will say, “Do you remember? Always remember,” and Ava says, “I will. I promise.”

FEBRUARY 2018

This month we are excited to spotlight the success of Rebecca Rosenberg, whose marvelous debut novel, The Secret Life of Mrs. London, was just published and is available in bookstores. online pharmacology course Rebecca completed this novel while she was a student in the Online Certificate Program in Novel Writing, which she discusses in her guest post below. Full disclosure: Rebecca was my One-on-One student in the program, meaning that she and I worked closely through the revision of her novel, which I had read portions of when she was first a student in my OWC Novel 1 course. She found an agent and sold the novel shortly after finishing the program.

Online Writing Lead Instructor

Guest post by Rebecca Rosenberg:

THE SECRET LIFE OF MRS. LONDON, by Rebecca Rosenberg

JANUARY 2018

This month, we are excited to spotlight the recent publication of personal essays by two of our Online Creative Writing students, Cate Hotchkiss and Mike Vangel. Both worked on their pieces while they were students in Stanford Continuing Studies courses, and both happen to have written about fitness — which seems especially appropriate in this month of January, when so many of us are making and trying to keep resolutions. I’m willing to bet that lots of your resolutions center on exercising more regularly, writing more regularly, or both. These two inspiring pieces by Stanford Continuing Studies student authors merged both goals, writing about the process of exercising.

Online Writing Lead Instructor

Mike Vangel has taken two writing classes with Rachel Smith, a fiction writing class on developing characters, and another class on writing comedy and tragedy. This piece about taking his first Bikram (hot and sweaty) yoga class with his girlfriend came from that class, and was published in Men’s Fitness.

DECEMBER 2017

Caroline Goodwin is a poet, essayist, and memoirist whose most recent collection of poetry, The Paper Tree, was published in March 2017 by Big Yes Press. Since receiving a Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford, she has taught creative writing extensively both here and at other colleges. This Winter, for the first time, she will be teaching a course for Continuing Studies called "Writing Through Struggle," encouraging students to use whatever challenges may have come up for them as substance for various forms of creative writing. Caroline herself is no stranger to writing through struggle, having maintained a vigorous writing process while dealing with numerous personal losses over the years. best content writing services In her essay "Amaranth: The Language of Memory," she touches upon those experiences in a poetic and fragmentary way that allows her to revisit them and hold them up to the light of examination. For this month’s Writer’s Spotlight, I asked Caroline about her own creative process and her intentions for the exciting new course.

Online Writing Lead Instructor

NOVEMBER 2017

Those of you who follow this monthly column know that I typically interview a Continuing Studies Creative Writing student or instructor whose recent publication or accomplishment I want to celebrate and bring to your attention. This month, I am happy to announce the publication of my own novel, Sparked, a collaboration with Helena Echlin, who also teaches fiction writing for the Online Writing Program. Helena and I decided to do a joint “interview,” in which we discuss why we chose to write a young adult novel together and the ins and outs of collaboration. Along the way, we offer a few tips to our students or any aspiring novelists.

Online Writing Lead Instructor

Both writers had published adult literary novels. But Sparked is a young adult thriller

OCTOBER 2017

This month’s Writer’s Spotlight by Stanford Continuing Studies’ Online Writing Lead Instructor, Malena Watrous, is focused on Litquake. This upcoming event is a Bay Area literary festival that will feature panel discussions, unique cross-media events, and more than 850 authors giving hundreds of readings. The grand finale capping off the festival takes place on Saturday, October 14, at Lit Crawl—a special night where eighty-five venues in San Francisco’s Mission District become stages for readings open to the public.

This year, for the fourth time, students from the Online Writing Certificate (OWC) program will participate, reading from the novels they have completed over the course of the program.

Reflections on Litquake, by Malena Watrous.

SEPTEMBER 2017

This month, we celebrate the recent literary accomplishments of Joanne Godley, who is not only an accomplished and gifted writer but also a physician, currently living and working in Hawaii. math tutoring online free Joanne has taken many courses through the Stanford Continuing Studies Online Writing Program, in virtually all of the genres that we offer: from creative nonfiction to fiction to poetry. She was my student first in a magazine writing course and then in the Online Writing Certificate Program in Novel Writing, through which she completed a rich and riveting historical novel about an African-American teacher who is recruited to work at a boarding school for Native American children.

Online Writing Lead Instructor

AUGUST 2017

This month, we celebrate the accomplishments of Suanne Schafer, who just received a publishing contract for her second novel with Waldorf Publishing, due out in 2019 – before her first is even released! Waldorf, based in Texas, is publishing both. Suanne’s first novel, A Different Kind of Fire, will be released in 2018.

Online Writing Lead Instructor

This month, we turn our Writer's Spotlight on Martha Conway, a novelist based in San Francisco whose fourth novel, The Underground River, went on sale June 20.

Online Writing Lead Instructor

This month, we celebrate the publication of Tilting: A Memoir, by Nicole Harkin, who has taken a wide variety of our online writing courses ever since we first started offering them. Nicole was a student of mine many years ago (I've lost track of exactly how many) in a magazine writing class, where I was immediately taken with her devious – some might say wicked – sense of humor, one I happen to share. Nicole's memoir possesses this same trademark dark humor, but although she manages to find the comedy in her family melodrama, she writes with great love for the people she's remembering, who are flawed and human, as we all are. Nicole's family story may be more extreme than most, which is why it's memoir-worthy, but she also finds universal truths about human frailty and the value of forgiveness, for the wronged as well as the wrong-doer. Tilting will be published June 22, but you can get a sneak preview in excerpts here, and more at www.tiltingamemoir.com. Nicole talked with me about her writing process and how her Stanford courses helped her to write this book.

Online Writing Lead Instructor

An excerpt from Tilting: A Memoir:

We only learned about our father’s girlfriend after he became deathly ill and lay in a coma one hundred and twenty miles from our home.

Malena Watrous: When did you start writing this memoir? How long did it take you?

Another excerpt from Tilting: A Memoir:

This month I talked to June Gillam, author of the Hillary Broome series of literary mysteries, who recently completed the Online Certificate Program in Novel Writing (even though she'd already written complete novels) out of a desire to learn more about the craft of novel writing and to get a better Kirkus review on her next book. She succeeded! June talked to me about both writing and marketing her novels, as well as about the exciting process of casting them for the audiobook versions.

Online Writing Lead Instructor

JG: The pitfalls of writing a series include having to remember details such as eye color, height, etc., from book to book for all the continuing characters. One way to overcome that problem, as one of my fellow writers in Sisters in Crime noted recently, is to kill off those ancillary actors as the series moves along!

APRIL 2017

Online Writing Lead Instructor

Lynne Blumberg writes: The essay I developed in Otis Haschemeyer's Tools class and finished in Lewis Robinson's Description class has been published. It's called "When I Realized My Religion," and it is in Tiferet: A Journal of Spiritual Literature. Also, something I wrote in response to an exercise in one of Malena Watrous' daily practice classes developed into an essay, and this was also published. This personal essay is called, "Learning from My Past," and it is in WritingDisorder.com/creative-nonfiction, Winter 2016-17 edition.

This month we celebrate the recent publication of a memoir by our beloved and acclaimed instructor Joshua Mohr: Sirens. Josh has been teaching for us for many years, most regularly in our Online Certificate Program in Novel Writing. In addition to teaching and raising his young daughter, he also manages to find the time to produce new books at a prodigious rate. Sirens is his first book-length work of nonfiction. Here’s how his publisher, Two Dollar Radio, describes the book:

FEBRUARY 2017

Inspired by the national Why There Are Words series (founded in Sausalito), Story Is the Thing invites established and emerging authors to read and discuss passages that they select from an assigned theme. The Kepler’s event takes place February 16 at 7:30 pm and the evening’s theme is “the electrifying moment.” Angela is hoping that some of her students who live on the peninsula might be able to attend, so that she can meet them in person and talk to them about their writing lives as well as her own. online paper editing service Angela is the author of the story collection Home Remedies, and the novel Lay It on My Heart.

An Interview with Core Instructor in our Online Certification Program in Novel Writing, Angela Pneuman

Malena Watrous: Having written both a collection of stories and a novel, which form calls to you now, and why? What do you like (or dislike) about both the long and short forms of fiction?

JANUARY 2017

This month, we are thrilled to spotlight the recent success of Online Writing Certificate student Elaine Ray, who received the 2016 Gival Press Short Story Award. Her story, titled “Pidgin,” was chosen by competition judge Thomas H. McNeely, who happens to be an instructor in the OWC program, although he never taught Elaine. online tutoring Small world! The award carries a prize of $1,000 and publication in the ejournal ArLiJo (Arlington Literary Journal), Issue 95. Here is a link to Elaine’s story: http://arlijo.com/

About Elaine Ray
Thomas McNeely's Praise for "Pidgin"

“In fewer than twenty pages, “Pidgin” sketches a world of its narrator of color’s post-colonial migration, political activism, and imprisonment within the choices offered him by history. At the same time, it’s a narrative that seems shaped by mysteries that transcend and yet throw into sharp relief its political moment, the chief one being the brilliant voice of its narrator, who is at once mercilessly exposed and utterly enigmatic. Elaine Ray is a writer who plays by her own rules, and is a writer to watch.”

—Thomas H. McNeely, Gival Press Short Story Award judge and author of Ghost Horse

THE WRITER'S SPOTLIGHT 2016

Click here to view stories from 2016. (Note Adobe Reader is needed to view the pdf)

©2018 – Stanford University – All Rights Reserved

Online Courses

ONLINE COURSES: CREATIVE WRITING

The Online Creative Writing Program makes it easy to take courses taught by instructors from Stanford’s writing community. Thanks to the flexibility of the online format, these courses can be taken anywhere, anytime—a plus for students who lead busy lives or for whom regular travel to the Stanford campus is not possible. These courses are open to all adults, and we encourage all levels of writers to enroll.

Technical Requirements and FAQs for Online Courses

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Giving 2.0: The MOOC

Learners will examine how to approach their giving in new ways, why they have given historically and how they – through strategy and planning – can give in a way that matters more.

The goal of this module is to study the tools used to craft a philanthropic strategy. Learners will be guided through issue area selection, the theory of change framework, how to assess a social or environmental issue’s landscape and how to pick a high-impact intervention strategy.

This module will empower learners to efficiently assess any nonprofit through a variety of tools, metrics and perspectives. Course participants will learn how to research and engage with nonprofits, as well as conduct a comprehensive nonprofit assessment.

Learners will reflect on all of the resources they can access and/or deploy in order to realize their full giving potential.

This module centers on discovering the many, diverse ways course participants can leverage their unique philanthropic resources to create the impact they want to have. We have numerous guest speakers sharing their expertise in this module – review the lessons that interest you before moving on to module 6.

Learners will take stock of their progress over the course and learn how to stay connected with the course content and their fellow course participants moving forward.

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Share this course

Just Announced
Self Paced
Starts Now
#23 The Science of the Solar System

California Institute of Technology via Coursera

#31 Marketing in a Digital World

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign via Coursera

#32 Moralities of Everyday Life

Yale University via Coursera

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832 courses / 185795 followers

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Humanities

875 courses / 86011 followers

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373 courses / 131870 followers

Personal Development

253 courses / 133099 followers

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537 courses / 88934 followers

Engineering

665 courses / 90269 followers

Health & Medicine

655 courses / 86196 followers

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298 courses / 81335 followers

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777 courses / 81925 followers

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Adventures in Writing (Stanford Online)

Welcome to Adventures in Writing, a series of graphic-novel style learning modules designed to help you learn more about and practice a range of effective written communication skills. You’ll immerse yourself in the adventures of Maya and Chris, using each module’s interactive exercises to apply what you’ve learned.

Writing instructors in Stanford’s Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR) designed the modules to reflect PWR’s philosophy that the best academic and real world communication practices require us to think about more than “correctness” or just getting things right—we must actively consider what we’re trying to achieve with a specific audience for a specific purpose. Through joining Maya and Chris on their adventures, you’ll develop your abilities to communicate in writing—from punctuation and style to argument—increasing the power of your language in the classroom and beyond.

Accepted into Stanford’s Program in Novel Writing!

I just got word I’ve been accepted into the Stanford Online Certificate Program in Novel Writing. Excited to start this two-year program in the fall and learn more about writing fiction to benefit myself and my Delta College English 49B, Creative Writing Fiction, students!

There are seven courses in the program, one of which needs to be “outside” the novel writing field, to add breadth to the program. We can take an on-campus class as this outside course, so I hope to do that and be able to experience not just Stanford’s online writing program but also on campus there.

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