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At the U, our goal is to give every student the chance to be part of unique learning experiences, and it’s why a degree from the U pays dividends far beyond the paper it’s printed on. Start your story – apply now.

Undergraduate Admission Requirements

Students who will have graduated from high school and have earned no transferrable college credit after high school.

Students with college credit after high school.

Students who have citizenship outside the United States.

Students who were previously enrolled at the University of Utah.

Students who wish to earn multiple bachelor’s degrees.

Students who graduated from high school seven or more years prior to applying, and have not attended another college or university.

Eligible students may attend after completing the 11th grade.

Utah high school sophomores through seniors take college-level course work.

Non-degree seeking?

Learn about how to apply to the U.

Completing the Application

Types of Questions

It helps to be prepared to answer the following questions before beginning the application. If you need to stop and restart your application you will be allowed. Please be sure to fully complete the application before submitting it. If you apply before the December 1 priority deadline, you will be automatically considered for merit and diversity scholarships.

You will be asked about your academic history (including GPA, ACT/SAT Test Scores, and courses taken), honors and awards, athletic participation, leadership roles and activities (including volunteering), work experience, and any special circumstances that may have affected your academic achievement.

Honors Essay

Undergraduate applicants will have the opportunity to apply to the Honors College by answering the following questions*:

The Honors College at the University of Utah offers the nation’s only Praxis Labs. Honors College Praxis Labs gather students from different majors to collaborate on innovative project-based solutions to big societal challenges. Students in these classes analyze a topic through in-depth classroom and field research such as lectures, panels, one-on-one interviews, readings and off-campus trips. After problems have been identified, students work together to put their solutions and ideas into action in the community.

Please submit both of your responses as one single document. Make sure to include your name and date of birth.

(In 500 words) Tell us about an issue or subject that fascinates you and why . What resources do you rely on when you want to learn more?

(In 50 words) What interests you about the Liberal Arts and Sciences education (hint: look this term up) offered by the Honors College?

*The Honors College priority application deadline is November 1.

Learn more about the Honors College admission process by visiting their website.

Paying the fee

After completing the application, you will be asked to pay the application fee. Some students may be eligible to waive the fee.

Privacy Act Notice & your Social Security Number

Your Social Security Number can help expedite enrollment and financial aid, but is not required.

The University confidentially maintains all application information, including your Social Security Number, which is used routinely to facilitate document matching, verify your identity, and expedite your enrollment and financial aid. Disclosure of your Social Security Number is voluntary, but failure to provide your Social Security Number may result in delay and confusion regarding your identity, and once admitted, could result in delay or loss of federal and state financial aid, tax credits, student loan deferments, veteran benefits, and other benefits under law.

Please note that the application is only valid for the semester in which you apply. If you do not attend classes for the term in which you applied, you must submit another admissions application and fee to be considered for a subsequent semester.

Making false or misleading statements on the application or failing to list all institutions attended may result in cancellation of admission status and/or loss of credit.

Admission requirements, deadlines, and fees are subject to change without prior notice.

All documents submitted to the University of Utah become its property and will not be released to students or other institutions. Admission applications and transcripts are destroyed after one year for students who do not attend.

Graduate Admissions

With 95 major fields of study at the graduate level, opportunities for academic and research opportunities abound.

Undergraduate Admissions University of Illinois Admissions wordmark The iconic orange block letter I with the words ILLINOIS ADMISSIONS written next to it

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How to Apply as a Freshman Applicant

1. Complete your application.

You’ll provide your high school courses and grades, choose your major and an alternative program, write an essay, and list your extracurricular activities, honors, and awards. We’ll also use your application to determine admission into campus honors programs and award merit-based scholarships.

2. Pay the application fee.

  • $50 Domestic
  • $75 International

When you submit the application, you’ll pay a nonrefundable fee by credit card. If you’re a domestic student who qualifies for a fee waiver, your guidance counselor must submit our fee waiver form.

3. Submit your test scores.

  • ACT Code: 1154
  • SAT I Code: 1836

Standardized test scores are required for admission review. We accept the ACT or SAT I. You don’t have to take the essay portion of the SAT. You also don’t have to take the writing portion of the ACT unless you’re applying to a teaching licensure program. Official test scores must be sent directly from the testing agency in time to meet our deadlines; we don’t accept copies of score reports.

4. Prove your English proficiency.

You need to demonstrate a command of the English language. If your first language isn’t English or you’re attending high school in a non-English-speaking country, we recommend you submit a TOEFL (code 1836) or IELTS score from a test you’ve taken within the past 2 years.

5. See if you have further application requirements.

Depending on the major you’re applying to, you may have a few more things to do.

International Applicants

You should also be aware of some additional requirements.

Art + Design Applicants

You also need to submit a portfolio. More information is available through the School of Art and Design or by calling 217-333-6632.

Dance Applicants

You also need to complete an audition. More information is available through the Department of Dance or by calling 217-333-1010.

Music Applicants

You also need to complete a music application and audition or interview. More information is available through the School of Music or by calling 217-244-7899.

Theatre Applicants

You also need to interview and complete an audition or portfolio review. More information is available through the Department of Theatre or by calling 217-333-2371.

6. Check your status.

Once you’ve submitted your application, check its status by clicking on your application in myIllini. If you applied through the Coalition Application and already have a myIllini account, you can use that existing account to view your status. If you didn’t have a myIllini account, we’ll create one for you and you’ll receive an email a few days after submitting the Coalition Application with instructions on how to access your myIllini account.

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901 West Illinois Street, Urbana, IL 61801

Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CST, Monday – Friday (closed on all campus holidays)

© Copyright 2018 University of Illinois Board of Trustees

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Essay Questions for Freshman Applicants

We want to give you enough time to craft the very best essays you can—and the best way to do that is to tell you what they are now.

Explain your interest in the major you selected and describe how you have recently explored or developed this interest inside and/or outside the classroom. You may also explain how this major relates to your future career goals. If you’re applying to the Division of General Studies, explain your academic interests and strengths or your future career goals. You may include any majors or areas of study you’re currently considering. Limit your response to 300 to 400 words.

If you select a second-choice major other than the Division of General Studies on your application, write a second essay explaining your interest in this major, too. Again, limit your response to 300 to 400 words.

Tips for Writing Your Essay

Be memorable.

The essay part of the application is important because it gives us more insight into who you are and who you want to be. Make us remember you!

Be prepared.

Take time to think about and brainstorm your message. Create an outline, write a good first draft, and edit multiple times.

Be yourself.

We want to know more about you, so be honest and let us into your world. Instead of making broad statements about what you want to do, give specific examples from high school or extracurricular activities. And don’t be afraid to add your personal style and voice to your writing!

You only have a couple of paragraphs to tell us about your experiences and goals. Choose your words wisely.

Be focused.

It’s not necessary for you to repeat information that’s already elsewhere in your application. Stay focused on explaining how those credentials and qualifications will lead to a successful future here.

Be professional.

Submitting a sloppy-looking essay with spelling errors and glaring mistakes sends us the message that you’re not serious about Illinois. Proofread your essays and ask your counselor, your English teacher, or a parent to take a second look.

Helpful Resources

Connect With Us

Contact Information

901 West Illinois Street, Urbana, IL 61801

Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CST, Monday – Friday (closed on all campus holidays)

© Copyright 2018 University of Illinois Board of Trustees

University of California – Admissions

Accessibility

How to apply

Freshman: Personal insight questions

What do you want UC to know about you? Here’s your chance to tell us in your own words.

Directions

  • You will have 8 questions to choose from. You must respond to only 4 of the 8 questions.
  • Each response is limited to a maximum of 350 words.
  • Which questions you choose to answer is entirely up to you: But you should select questions that are most relevant to your experience and that best reflect your individual circumstances.

Keep in mind

  • All questions are equal: All are given equal consideration in the application review process, which means there is no advantage or disadvantage to choosing certain questions over others.
  • There is no right or wrong way to answer these questions: It’s about getting to know your personality, background, interests and achievements in your own unique voice.  

Questions & guidance

Remember, the personal questions are just that — personal. Which means you should use our guidance for each question just as a suggestion in case you need help. The important thing is expressing who you are, what matters to you and what you want to share with UC. 

1. Describe an example of your leadership experience in which you have positively influenced others, helped resolve disputes or contributed to group efforts over time.  

Did you lead a team? How did your experience change your perspective on leading others? Did you help to resolve an important dispute at your school, church, in your community or an organization? And your leadership role doesn’t necessarily have to be limited to school activities. For example, do you help out or take care of your family?

How does your creativity influence your decisions inside or outside the classroom? Does your creativity relate to your major or a future career?

Does the talent come naturally or have you worked hard to develop this skill or talent? Does your talent or skill allow you opportunities in or outside the classroom? If so, what are they and how do they fit into your schedule?

If you choose to write about educational barriers you’ve faced, how did you overcome or strive to overcome them? What personal characteristics or skills did you call on to overcome this challenge? How did overcoming this barrier help shape who are you today?

If you’re currently working your way through a challenge, what are you doing now, and does that affect different aspects of your life? For example, ask yourself, “How has my life changed at home, at my school, with my friends or with my family?”

Has your interest in the subject influenced you in choosing a major and/or future career? Have you been able to pursue coursework at a higher level in this subject (honors, AP, IB, college or university work)? Are you inspired to pursue this subject further at UC, and how might you do that?

7. What have you done to make your school or your community a better place?  

Why were you inspired to act? What did you learn from your effort? How did your actions benefit others, the wider community or both? Did you work alone or with others to initiate change in your community?

From your point of view, what do you feel makes you an excellent choice for UC? Don’t be afraid to brag a little.

Need more help?

  • Download the worksheet for freshman applicants [PDF]
  • See our writing tips & techniques

Ready to get started?

It’s a good idea to work on the questions before you enter them into the application. Here’s a word doc with all the questions to help you.

How to Apply

Who will move the world? You will.

Complete the steps below to be evaluated for admission to the University of Arizona as a freshman.

1 Review Admissions Requirements

Students can earn admission to UA in two ways:

  1. Students may earn admission to UA through the Assured Admission process if they are an Arizona resident, attend a regionally accredited high school, rank in the top 25 percent of their graduating class, and have no course work deficiencies as prescribed by the Arizona Board of Regents or earn a GPA of 3.0 or higher in their core coursework. You can view a detailed list of the course requirements on our ABOR Course Competencies page.
  2. All students not considered Arizona residents and students who do not meet the above requirements for Assured Admission will be evaluated through our Comprehensive Review Process. You can view more details about Comprehensive Review on our Applicant Review Process page.

You can view a detailed overview of our admissions review process on our Applicant Review Process page.

Please note some programs or colleges may require additional information and/or admission requirements as noted on their individual requirements pages:

2 Complete Your Application

A complete application includes

  1. A completed application form*
  2. Payment of application fee

*A completed application form includes all self-reported grades through your 6th semester and courses in progress for initial admission consideration. You will need an unofficial high school transcript and/or access to your coursework in order to complete this section on the application. We will be verifying your coursework pending a final official transcript submission prior to the start of your freshman year at UA. Please visit our Frequently Asked Questions page to review answers to commonly asked questions related to our self-reporting process.

Submit your official SAT/ACT scores to be considered for merit scholarships or the UA Honors College.

Ready to apply? Complete the application through our UA Future portal. You can also find us on the Coalition and Common Applications. After you apply, check your email for more information regarding how to track your application status.

Or, download a printable application or request an application by mail.

Official high school transcript(s)

Please do not send us your official high school transcripts at this time. We will use your self-reported grades on your application for initial evaluation and review for the admission decision. Your official transcripts will be required before you enroll at the University of Arizona. More information will be provided upon admission. In the meantime, check out these frequently asked questions.

Official college/university transcript(s)

If you’ve completed any college or university course work during or post-high school, you will be asked to submit any/all official college transcripts at enrollment.

4 Submit Your Official SAT and/or ACT Scores

Submitting your official SAT/ACT scores is optional for admissions consideration. However, test scores are REQUIRED in order to be considered for merit scholarships, the UA Honors College, the College of Nursing, or the College of Engineering.

As of March 2016 the College Board has issued a redesigned SAT. The University of Arizona will accept the previous test scores for years to come.

Learn how, when, and where to submit your SAT/ACT scores.

Deadlines and Fees

Application Fees

Our application processing fee is:

  • $50 for Arizona Residents
  • $80 for non-Arizona Residents

We also accept fee waivers, please contact your high school counselor for more information.

Important Deadlines

Don’t forget key deadlines, including application deadlines, tuition, federal financial aid (FAFSA ), and scholarship deadlines.

Additional Information

© 2018 The Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of The University of Arizona.

University of Michigan Questions

Essay #1 (Required for all applicants.)

Everyone belongs to many different communities and/or groups defined by (among other things) shared geography, religion, ethnicity, income, cuisine, interest, race, ideology, or intellectual heritage. Choose one of the communities to which you belong, and describe that community and your place within it.

Essay #2 (Required for all applicants.) FRESHMEN APPLICANTS

Describe the unique qualities that attract you to the specific undergraduate College or School (including preferred admission and dual degree programs) to which you are applying at the University of Michigan. How would that curriculum support your interests?

Essay #2 (Required for all applicants.) TRANSFER APPLICANTS

Describe the unique qualities that attract you to the specific undergraduate College or School to which you are applying at the University of Michigan. How would that curriculum support your interests?

515 East Jefferson Street, 1220 Student Activities Building

University of California – Admissions

Accessibility

How to apply

Freshman: Personal insight questions

What do you want UC to know about you? Here’s your chance to tell us in your own words.

Directions

  • You will have 8 questions to choose from. You must respond to only 4 of the 8 questions.
  • Each response is limited to a maximum of 350 words.
  • Which questions you choose to answer is entirely up to you: But you should select questions that are most relevant to your experience and that best reflect your individual circumstances.

Keep in mind

  • All questions are equal: All are given equal consideration in the application review process, which means there is no advantage or disadvantage to choosing certain questions over others.
  • There is no right or wrong way to answer these questions: It’s about getting to know your personality, background, interests and achievements in your own unique voice.  

Questions & guidance

Remember, the personal questions are just that — personal. Which means you should use our guidance for each question just as a suggestion in case you need help. The important thing is expressing who you are, what matters to you and what you want to share with UC. 

1. Describe an example of your leadership experience in which you have positively influenced others, helped resolve disputes or contributed to group efforts over time.  

Did you lead a team? How did your experience change your perspective on leading others? Did you help to resolve an important dispute at your school, church, in your community or an organization? And your leadership role doesn’t necessarily have to be limited to school activities. For example, do you help out or take care of your family?

How does your creativity influence your decisions inside or outside the classroom? Does your creativity relate to your major or a future career?

Does the talent come naturally or have you worked hard to develop this skill or talent? Does your talent or skill allow you opportunities in or outside the classroom? If so, what are they and how do they fit into your schedule?

If you choose to write about educational barriers you’ve faced, how did you overcome or strive to overcome them? What personal characteristics or skills did you call on to overcome this challenge? How did overcoming this barrier help shape who are you today?

If you’re currently working your way through a challenge, what are you doing now, and does that affect different aspects of your life? For example, ask yourself, “How has my life changed at home, at my school, with my friends or with my family?”

Has your interest in the subject influenced you in choosing a major and/or future career? Have you been able to pursue coursework at a higher level in this subject (honors, AP, IB, college or university work)? Are you inspired to pursue this subject further at UC, and how might you do that?

7. What have you done to make your school or your community a better place?  

Why were you inspired to act? What did you learn from your effort? How did your actions benefit others, the wider community or both? Did you work alone or with others to initiate change in your community?

From your point of view, what do you feel makes you an excellent choice for UC? Don’t be afraid to brag a little.

Need more help?

  • Download the worksheet for freshman applicants [PDF]
  • See our writing tips & techniques

Ready to get started?

It’s a good idea to work on the questions before you enter them into the application. Here’s a word doc with all the questions to help you.

The University of Chicago

College Admissions

The University of Chicago has long been renowned for its provocative essay questions. We think of them as an opportunity for students to tell us about themselves, their tastes, and their ambitions. They can be approached with utter seriousness, complete fancy, or something in between.

Each year we email newly admitted and current College students and ask them for essay topics. We receive several hundred responses, many of which are eloquent, intriguing, or downright wacky.

As you can see from the attributions, the questions below were inspired by submissions from UChicago students and alumni.

2017-18 UChicago Supplement:

Required Question:

How does the University of Chicago, as you know it now, satisfy your desire for a particular kind of learning, community, and future? Please address with some specificity your own wishes and how they relate to UChicago.

Extended Essay Questions:

(Required; Choose one)

Essay Option 1.

“The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress.” – Joseph Joubert

Sometimes, people talk a lot about popular subjects to assure ‘victory’ in conversation or understanding, and leave behind topics of less popularity, but great personal or intellectual importance. What do you think is important but under-discussed?

Essay Option 2.

Due to a series of clerical errors, there is exactly one typo (an extra letter, a removed letter, or an altered letter) in the name of every department at the University of Chicago. Oops! Describe your new intended major. Why are you interested in it and what courses or areas of focus within it might you want to explore? Potential options include Commuter Science, Bromance Languages and Literatures, Pundamentals: Issues and Texts, Ant History. a full list of unmodified majors ready for your editor’s eye is available here: https://collegeadmissions.uchicago.edu/academics/majors-minors.

-Inspired by Josh Kaufman, Class of 2018

Essay Option 3.

Earth. Fire. Wind. Water. Heart! Captain Planet supposes that the world is made up of these five elements. We’re familiar with the previously-noted set and with actual elements like hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, but select and explain another small group of things (say, under five) that you believe compose our world.

-Inspired by Dani Plung, Class of 2017

Essay Option 4.

The late New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham once said “Fashion is the armor to survive the reality of everyday life. I don’t think you could do away with it. It would be like doing away with civilization.” Tell us about your “armor.”

-Inspired by Adam Berger, Class of 2020

Essay Option 5.

Fans of the movie Sharknado say that they enjoy it because “it’s so bad, it’s good.” Certain automobile owners prefer classic cars because they “have more character.” And recently, vinyl record sales have skyrocketed because it is perceived that they have a warmer, fuller sound. Discuss something that you love not in spite of but rather due to its quirks or imperfections.

-Inspired by Alex Serbanescu, Class of 2021

Essay Option 6.

In the spirit of adventurous inquiry, pose your own question or choose one of our past prompts. Be original, creative, thought provoking. Draw on your best qualities as a writer, thinker, visionary, social critic, sage, citizen of the world, or future citizen of the University of Chicago; take a little risk, and have fun.

Why UChicago?

I came to UChicago because I wanted a world-class education in a diverse neighborhood with the natural amenities of a large city. Additionally, I came to learn how to think. Sure, learning a specific skill-set is also great, but the ability to think critically, I believe, will take me much farther.

Because of the University of Chicago.

. I now have a wide network of friends and colleagues around the world; an education that speaks volumes wherever I go; and a community (Chicago) that I love and cherish.

Highlighted Links

An Essay Discussion

Dean Furda and the Penn Admissions staff offer inspiration, reassurance, and direction for students starting their college essays.

A Writer’s Block Could Be Your Building Block

A Penn student offers essay writing tips with this entry in our Penn Admissions Blog

As a part of the application process, applicants must complete a personal essay. Additionally, Penn applicants must complete the Penn-specific Essay.

We carefully read each essay you submit, as they can help us get to know you much better than your transcripts and test scores. While essays are a good indication of how well you write, they are also windows into how you think, what you value, and how you see the world. Your numbers tell us what kind of student you are. Your essays tell us what sort of person you are—and provide a glimpse into the intangibles you might bring to our community.

Be sure to answer the question or questions that are being asked of you. We understand that you may be writing essays for different schools and you may be looking to reuse material, but read through your essay to make sure your essay is relevant to the essay prompt. Essay topics are chosen because the Admissions Committee wants to know these specific things about you. If you do not address the question directly, the Admissions Committee is left with having to make decisions regarding your application with incomplete information.

Students applying to Penn must submit their application for admission to one of our four undergraduate schools. In the Penn-specific Essay, be sure to specifically address both why you are applying to Penn and why you are applying to that specific undergraduate school. Students who are applying to one of our coordinated dual-degree programs will have additional essays they need to complete, but the Penn essay should address the single-degree or single-school choice.

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