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UCLA Anderson Full-Time MBA

2017-2018 UCLA Anderson application has maintained the trend of keeping one required essay and has raised the bar by asking for you to show more of your personal side and then relate it to how Anderson’s principle relate to your career goals. A single essay makes the MBA application easier and difficult at the same time. It requires lesser time and mental energy but makes it difficult for you to differentiate yourself. One good thing about this essay though, is the generous word limit. Make the most of it!

UCLA Anderson MBA Essay Tips Tips 2017-2018

We believe that the best results are achieved when you share success, think fearlessly and drive change. With this in mind, what are your goals at UCLA Anderson and in your short-term and long-term career? (750 words maximum)

Essay 1 Tips

The changed wording from last years essay makes this essay somewhat tricky. Many schools emphasize the need for cultural fit but UCLA is going a step further by explicitly asking you to share your core values and demonstrate how UCLA’s principles will be aligned with your career goals AND what do you plan to do while pursuing your MBA at UCLA Anderson.

Read through UCLA principles in detail, talk to current students, alums and adcom to find out how the cultural values translate into everyday thoughts and actions at UCLA. How collaborative is UCLA community and how they truly live the share success principle? How will they encourage you to stretch yourself and dare to dream different and big? Are they really serious about questioning the status quo and leading and adopting new paradigms? And how ALL this is critical to your success?

Optional Essay

Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? (250 words)

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Rohit Bansal , Kellogg Northwestern

Optional Essay Tips

The main question in any optional essay is to decide whether you need to write it at all.

Attempt the UCLA Anderson optional essay only if you feel that it will improve the factual and material strength of your application and if you have specific extenuating circumstances that need to be explained.

Use the optional essay to explain shortfalls in your application which you feel are truly detrimental to your candidature. Areas of underperformance (academic or professional or GMAT) or events which stick out such as gaps in your resumes or a previous MBA or academic disciplinary actions are possible reasons why you attempt this optional essay. Comment on your shortcomings with intelligence, perspective and credibility: giving vague excuses or blaming xyz for failures will be completely counter-productive. Explain the issue clearly and maintain greater focus on the correction for the issue. Keep it brief.

If you need guidance for your UCLA Anderson MBA application get in touch!

Reapplicant Essay

Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (700 words maximum)

Reapplicant Essay Tips

Writing the reapplicant essay is a two-step process.

Step 1: Discover and annihilate all weaknesses/errors in your earlier application.

Step 2: Demonstrate that you are a far better candidate than you were 12 months back.

Some of the common errors are: A weak goal, inconsistencies within/across the essays/recos, a strong goal which is unfortunately unsubstantiated elsewhere in the application, essays that are good individually but do not make a strong case as they lack an underlying theme, very few or canned “Why Anderson” points, little or no non-work activities across the essays. It is also possible that your essays are pretty good but you got the timing/profile/scores/recos wrong.

Step 2 is to convince the UCLA admissions committee that this new Version 2.00 of you is better, brighter, worthier.

> Think: Jot down EVERY improvement you have made in EVERY aspect of your life. This will help you build an initial image of the Version 2.0 applicant. The one year period for the UCLA reapplication leaves little time for massive profile upgrades, but give it your best shot.

> Work: Through your experiences and achievements since you last applied to UCLA illustrate how you can contribute better to Anderson, gain more from it and are in a better position to achieve your short/long term goals. Been promoted? Got awards? Won new assignments? Mention ’em all.

> Goals: Make a stronger case for your goals by specifying why/how you have greater skills, experience, perspective etc. to make your dreams come true – long term and short term. Preferably stick with the goal/s given last year; in case your goals are different, you better have good reasons as you will definitely have to put it down in the essay.

For help with your UCLA Anderson MBA application explore how we can help you

UCLA Anderson MBA Essay Tips Archive

UCLA Anderson Essay Tips 2016-2017

Essay 1. We believe that the best results are achieved when you share success, think fearlessly and drive change. With this in mind, what are your goals at UCLA Anderson and in your short-term and long-term career? (750 words maximum)

Essay 1 Tips. The changed wording from last years essay makes this essay somewhat tricky. Many schools emphasize the need for fit but UCLA is going a step further by explicitly asking you to share your core values and demonstrate how UCLA’s principles will be aligned with your career goals AND what do you plan to do while pursuing your MBA at UCLA Anderson.

Read through UCLA principles in detail, talk to current students, alums and adcom to find out how the cultural values translate into everyday thoughts and actions at UCLA. How collaborative is UCLA community and how they truly live the share success principle? How will they encourage you to stretch yourself and dare to dream different and big? Are they really serious about questioning the status quo and leading and adopting new paradigms? And how ALL this is critical to your success?

Optional Essay. Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? (250 words) No preference is given in the evaluation process to applicants who submit an optional essay.

The main question in any optional essay is to decide whether you need to write it at all.

Attempt the Anderson optional essay only if you feel that it will improve the factual and material strength of your application and if you have specific extenuating circumstances that need to be explained.

Use the optional essay to explain shortfalls in your application which you feel are truly detrimental to your candidature. Areas of underperformance (academic or professional or GMAT) or events which stick out such as gaps in your resumes or a previous MBA or academic disciplinary actions are possible reasons why you attempt this optional essay. Comment on your shortcomings with intelligence, perspective and credibility: giving vague excuses or blaming xyz for failures will be completely counter-productive. Explain the issue clearly and maintain greater focus on the correction for the issue.

UCLA Anderson Essay Tips 2015-2016

Essay 1. We believe that the best results are achieved when you share success, think fearlessly and drive change. With this in mind, what are your goals at UCLA Anderson and in your short-term and long-term career? (750 words maximum)

Essay 1 Tips. The changed wording from last years essay makes this essay somewhat tricky. Many schools emphasize the need for fit but UCLA is going a step further by explicitly asking you to share your core values and demonstrate how UCLA’s principles will be aligned with your career goals AND what do you plan to do while pursuing your MBA at UCLA Anderson.

Read through UCLA principles in detail, talk to current students, alums and adcom to find out how the cultural values translate into everyday thoughts and actions at UCLA. How collaborative is UCLA community and how they truly live the share success principle? How will they encourage you to stretch yourself and dare to dream different and big? Are they really serious about questioning the status quo and leading and adopting new paradigms? And how ALL this is critical to your success?

Optional Essay. Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? (250 words) No preference is given in the evaluation process to applicants who submit an optional essay.

The main question in any optional essay is to decide whether you need to write it at all.

Attempt the Anderson optional essay only if you feel that it will improve the factual and material strength of your application and if you have specific extenuating circumstances that need to be explained.

Use the optional essay to explain shortfalls in your application which you feel are truly detrimental to your candidature. Areas of underperformance (academic or professional or GMAT) or events which stick out such as gaps in your resumes or a previous MBA or academic disciplinary actions are possible reasons why you attempt this optional essay. Comment on your shortcomings with intelligence, perspective and credibility: giving vague excuses or blaming xyz for failures will be completely counter-productive. Explain the issue clearly and maintain greater focus on the correction for the issue.

UCLA Anderson School of Management MBA Essay

UCLA Anderson

Essay Question: Describe your short-term and long-term career goals. How can the UCLA Anderson experience add value to your professional development? (500 words maximum)

Folks, this UCLA MBA essay prompt is as “bog-standard” as it gets. But (and we hope this is the case?) assuming you’re applying to several business schools, you may find slight variations on this question. So let’s zero in on the THREE elements you need to pay attention to here, along with the 500-word frame the MBA Admissions committee at Anderson has given us.

1. Short Term Goals

The name of the game here is “how good is your plan.” Put differently, “how good are you at conceiving of an objective, and then mapping out an action plan to getting it done?” There’s ONE additional layer, which is, “does this plan make sense given who you are, your background, strengths, weaknesses, etc. or… is it a stretch?”

Those are the only things that matter, folks. Notice how we didn’t say “is your actual goal interesting, or good?” Why? Because it’s actually irrelevant. No one’s going to follow-up on you to make sure you’re continuing along “the path you set out in your business school application.” This is a test. “Do you have a business school mind? Can you plan smartly? Are you logical? Is your brain efficient? are you connecting the right dots?” You get the picture. As long as you pass that test, the actual goal is immaterial. Those of you who can wrap your head around that will relinquish that vice-like grip around needing to SELL the idea itself. Again, no one cares about your idea. They ONLY care about that other stuff.

2. Long Term Goals

The long term vision – by contrast – can be a little more eye-popping. If you have a cool idea, or if there’s a contagiousness to your aspirations, it can rub off on everything else you touch. Now, that doesn’t make this a contest for “come up with the coolest-sounding idea you can, therefore.” Because VIABILITY continues to matter.

Better to have a B+ long term vision that you seem 100% likely to achieve than an A+ idea that you’re 10% likely to achieve. (Can you feel the difference? And understand why?) In a nutshell, any couch potato can come up with an amazing idea. But the person who can execute on it ALSO… that person is a diamond in the rough. Show us that you’re THAT person, and the best way to do that is to ooze that sense of “this is not a pipe dream, this is all doable” at every turn.

3. How can UCLA add value to your professional development?

Standard stuff. But don’t just point out things that appeal to you about Anderson. Don’t just name drop classes and organizations and professors and suggest that you’re going to engage with them. It’s the equivalent of reminding us that you’ll also be remembering to breathe in and out during yours days at UCLA, and that you’ll also be eating meals and showering on occasion. “We assume all that, and this tells us nothing new.” The trick is to reveal the precise way that some aspect of UCLA will propel you forward/up toward your goals. Think about attempting your goals in three different ways:

  1. Without an MBA from UCLA Anderson.
  2. With an MBA from ANY OTHER BUSINESS SCHOOL.
  3. Specifically WITH an MBA from UCLA Anderson.

Like, actually do it. Go through that exercise. The answers should all look DIFFERENT. Isolate the specific ways in which the UCLA version is different from numbers 1 and 2. Then convey them here, the way you would explain in almost-scientific terms, the impact a chemical has on another chemical, causing it to react or respond in this way and that way, etc.

Think of certain aspects of UCLA as being chemicals that will cause YOUR PROGRESS TOWARD YOUR GOALS to “react” (positively) in a certain way. Walk us through it. Be specific. Is Los Angeles a character here? Are there certain professors at UCLA who will impact you in a specific way? Are there UCLA offerings that no other school has that will make a meaningful dent in your progress?

With each example, it must be evident how the UCLA component has nudged you further along on your career goals trajectory. If it isn’t, you haven’t done your job here. Here’s a cool test. Leave us with the sense that, even if you were to be admitted to UCLA alongside a few higher-ranked MBA programs, you may still elect UCLA MBA because of the case you JUST made for how UCLA specifically, impacts you in a particularly tasty way.

The 500 words in your UCLA MBA Essay should go something like:

  1. Establish the Problem/Opportunity/Lay Out the LT Vision (50-75 words)
  2. Relevant Background Highlights, Significant Milestones that show us a trajectory (125 words)
  3. Leading up to Short-Term goals – Create an ACTION PLAN, be specific, convince us you’ve thought this through from every angle (100–150 words)
  4. Muse Briefly on the Long-Term aspects of the overall plan, explain the significance, reveal your passion (75 words)
  5. Connect the dots between UCLA and Pushing You Forward (two or three solid examples) (100 words)

As an additional resource, check out this blog post we wrote about addressing the “How will our school help you?” question (in general). You can also read another blog post (from the same four-part series) that covers the “of all the B-schools on earth, why are you interested in ours?” question. You can also learn more about UCLA Anderson’s essays and additional MBA application requirements here.

2016-2017 UCLA Anderson MBA Essay Tips

UCLA Anderson School of Management is a small and close-knit school with particular focus on entrepreneurship, entertainment, real estate and other major industries in Southern California. While UCLA has a dominant position in the region it is also a nationally known program that will position you well in whatever career you pursue.

Anderson is highly selective about the composition of each MBA class, therefore your fit with the values and principles of the school is of primary importance. When approaching this set of essays make sure you understand what Anderson will do for you and what you plan to bring to the community.

We have helped countless applicants achieve their UCLA Anderson dreams. Contact us to learn how Stacy Blackman Consulting can help you.

First-Time Applicants: One Required Essay:

We believe that the best results are achieved when you share success, think fearlessly and drive change. With this in mind, what are your goals at UCLA Anderson and in your short-term and long-term career? (750 words maximum)

This question was new last year, and UCLA Anderson Admissions Director Craig Hubbell shared his thoughts about the essay in the admissions blog. Note that he recommends watching this video.

He also elaborates on the three phrases in the video and essay question: “At UCLA Anderson, three principles form our foundation. First, we SHARE SUCCESS within our community, which is to say we collaborate to achieve our goals. While working together, we THINK FEARLESSLY to go past the obvious, to go around the obstacles—with our sights set on making a real impact. And with the opportunity for impact comes our desire to DRIVE CHANGE as a result of all that we do.”

Thorough school research will provide examples you can use to describe why these values and principles drive your goals while attending UCLA Anderson. Your career goals should be examined through the filter of Anderson’s values and how you plan to use those values in your post-Anderson life.

When structuring this essay consider telling one or two pivotal stories to illuminate who you are. UCLA is looking for personal expression in this essay, and to understand how you are different from other applicants. Consider the turning points or moments that triggered reflection for you.

Have you experienced a significant personal setback? What is your family background? Have you lived outside your home country? When did you face a turning point or make a big decision about your career? What were some of your proudest accomplishments? What moments have called upon your need to collaborate, lead or innovate?

For the second part of the essay briefly explain what you plan to do immediately after graduation, and then what you want to accomplish over the long-term with your career. A career path that focuses on demonstrated passions and interests throughout your life is going to be most compelling as you write this essay and each section should bridge seamlessly into the next.

For the part of the essay focusing on UCLA Anderson’s part in your plans, UCLA specifically requests citing specific classes, professors and programs. To express a bit more on the personal side it will be helpful to include the social and extracurricular aspects that attract you to the small and close-knit experience at Anderson. Be specific as you discuss the clubs and conferences that are unique to the UCLA MBA.

Optional Essay:

The following essay is optional. No preference is given in the evaluation process to applicants who submit an optional essay. Please note that we only accept written essays.

Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? Please use your best judgment. (250 words maximum)

It is important to focus on explanations rather than excuses in this essay. Potential extenuating circumstances may be a very low GPA, academic probation or using a recommender other than your current supervisor.

Clearly explain the situation, and if it is a situation from the past, explain why you have changed. Providing evidence that you will not repeat the actions in question will help to solidify your answer.

Reapplicant: One Required Essay:

Reapplicants who applied for the class entering in 2015 or 2016 are required to complete the following essay:

Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words maximum)

If you are a recent re-applicant this essay gives you the opportunity to highlight improvements since your last application. You have room to add other “ways in which you have improved your candidacy” such as an improved GMAT score, academic updates or extracurricular activities. While most MBA programs are focused on quantitative improvements to your profile, keep in mind that here UCLA Anderson is expressly asking for an update on your career.

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more.

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Ucla anderson essay

Question: Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words)

My short term goal is to seek a US-based position as Business Development Manager in a company such as Sony or Apple in a business group with a technological orientation in New Media or Mobile Devices. I look forward to leading the entrepreneurial initiatives and innovation such a position requires. Here I would be responsible for locating undeveloped market areas, and creating innovative business models for new products. My plan is to stay with this company for 4-5 years, fulfilling at least one other position in another business group, as I would like to broaden my knowledge of the markets more quickly in order to move on to pursue my own entrepreneurial venture. Eventually, I hope to return to the high tech industry in my country and work to found my own company.

My interest in pursuing management and marketing aspects of software development was sparked during my student job at WeFi when I participated in WeFi’s teams’ impressive marketing efforts for the product release. Since then I have worked as a software engineer in two leading International companies to solidify the technological foundation necessary to support my goals. I know that if I relied solely on my Engineering training I would probably be able to advance to project and even product management, but I will need an MBA if I am to advance to highest management positions, eventually starting my own venture. At this point I am eager to gain the specialized business training that Anderson’s MBA could offer me to help achieve my goals.

One of the biggest attractions of Anderson is the Applied Managerial Research Program, which is unique in its breadth and extent. This level of real world training would provide an opportunity to meet with industry leaders that can help launch my career, and gain experience in the operational workings of a large US company while still in school. I believe this experience will offer me a serious edge over graduates of other programs who will not have this training when seeking my first job after graduation. I am excited to see how the required electives for the Engineering and Technology Management Career path address the exact skills of technology and project management and product development I will need for my post MBA positions. Another big attraction is the significant role that the Price Center plays in Anderson’s program and how it could offer me key insights in the area of entrepreneurship. The unique opportunity to consult entrepreneurial firms for six month, and the amount of extra-curricular activities if offers, which is unparalleled to any other center in any other program, make me sure that I could gain skills and knowledge of new venture management that I know I will need in order to eventually start my own company.

In addition, Anderson’s entrepreneurship orientation would gives me a distinct advantage utilizing the alumni network to forward my plans for my own future venture. Being a part of a network where many of its members are or were trained as entrepreneurs is a benefit other programs can’t offer. It would assure that in the future I could consult and cooperate with people with similar goals who are more likely to have direct experience in areas that I will be working in myself.

Finally, I am eager to be a part of a program that emphasizes creating a supportive open community. I know myself to make friends quickly and working in cooperative environments has always made me achieve the best results. I spoke to MBA 2010 Arik Waldman, who assured me that at Anderson team play really shines both in and outside of the classroom, which I connect with as a core value in my own life and which I know will support my professional skills and assure a high quality social experience.

Amongst the activities offered by the Anderson Student Association, I will naturally join the Entrepreneur Association, but I am also looking forward to joining the Anderson Public Speaking Club as I was a passionate debater during my undergraduate degree. Also, I am excited about the opportunity to finally learn to surf.

It’s easy to see why Anderson’s MBA offers an advantage on so many important points for me and I look forward towards leveraging all of the advantages to help me achieve my future goals.

Question: What is something people will find surprising about you?

Though I was never the fastest or the strongest I have always been considered a good player. Thinking about my days playing rugby what I remember most is how much I enjoyed spending time with the team. We were a close group of friends and I think the team patriotism and companionship were what gave me the motivation to excel.

I played as scrumhalf; I was agile and could give a proper tackle, but I think my most significant part in the team was building the team’s spirit. I’d motivate on difficult matches, make sure we were sportsmanlike when we were winning and always keep a fun atmosphere during practices.

My friends used to say I never give up. Indeed, every time we took the field I felt there’s no way I’ll let any of them down. Playing with the team I’ve suffered from a brain concussion, torn muscle, broken teeth and up till today my shoulder makes a ticking sound but I always came back to play and gave it my best.

In our first season’s last game, seconds from the final whistle I stopped with a diving tackle an opponent player from scoring a try. We lost miserably that day but my friend and I still reminisce on that tackle, the tackle that got my invited to the national team.

I trained with the national team on several camps. Unfortunately when finally our first international game arrived – a friendship game against the South-African team, I missed it because I was accepted to the military’s flight academy and was enlisted to the army before the match. Though disappointed by the unfortunate schedule I learnt that my experiences with the team have prepared me well for my time at the army and I soon found myself playing similar roles with my fellow trainees as I did with my teammates.

Question: Describe the biggest risk you have ever taken, the outcome, and what you learned in the process. (500 words)

I couldn’t sleep. Earlier that night, during my weekly poker game, I learned that a neighborhood nightclub is closing down after suffering losses. The sense of opportunity kept me awake. Jaded, I got out of bed, made two phone calls, and started writing my thoughts. A few hours later the paper was filled with ideas and calculations.

At 9 am, my friends Dan and Alex arrived. The sight of breakfast I prepared seemed to erase their crankiness from being woken up earlier that night. We then started reviewing my plan: Establishing a new nightclub.

My friends were skeptical. “How will we finance this?” asked Alex, “I’m not sure this is worth losing our regular jobs” said Dan. I then took the notes I made and presented my rough business plan, “This evolves taking a chance, I believe we can make it work” I said. Later, while washing the dishes, I wondered whether getting into business with friends was wise. I remember feeling good; I’d rather pursue such adventure with trustworthy friends than with strangers.

Next, we met with the venue’s owner and negotiated a cost and profit sharing method. Now we could set a date for the launching party and divide responsibilities amongst ourselves.

I was in charge of sponsors and public relations. I realized every endorsement meant less money we’ll have to invest. I approached a beverages supplier and negotiated a deal; in return for him sponsoring our invitations, we printed a picture of a drink he promoted. I also persuaded my sailing club, a diving club, and a flight school to give out lessons as prizes as endorsements and initiated an opening night raffle to attract more people.

Next, I established a public relations team. I only wanted to hire people who believed, like I did, we’re going to do something great. I hired 35 people, created groups and appointed team leaders. We brainstormed PR strategies together such as a membership card.

With the help of team leaders, I guided our PR staff, monitored and coordinated the distribution of posters and invitations. I also oversaw the forming of our guest lists and helped negotiate special “birthday deals” with clients.

Finally, opening night came. We expected 400 people to arrive, but more than 650 came. Our revenues totaled nearly $9,000, and we made a profit. I was incredibly proud of our team. Although I quickly realized I didn’t enjoy working in the “nightlife scene”, now that my initiative was running, my friends could continue without me.

For the rest of the season the club was at full capacity of 1,100 people.

In retrospect, taking this risk was an invaluable experience that taught me much about launching a business. I learned that working in teams motivates me to excel and gained more confidence in my abilities to lead people. I realized that thoroughly planning ahead can reduce much of the risk but creativity, resourcefulness and teamwork are crucial in solving problems on-the-go.

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