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Applying for Admission

Who can apply

UCLA accepts applications from first-time freshmen and junior-level transfer students.

Who is a first-time freshman?

You are considered a first-time freshman applicant for admission purposes if:

  • you are still in high school, or
  • you have graduated from high school but have not enrolled in a regular session at any college or university. You cannot disregard your college record and apply as a freshman.

If you plan to attend a college summer session immediately after graduating from high school or have completed college work while in high school, the University still considers you a freshman applicant.

Who is a junior-level transfer student?

  • You are a transfer student if you graduated from high school and enrolled in a regular session at any college or university since your high school graduation. You cannot disregard your college record and apply as a freshman.
  • To be considered junior level you must have completed 60-86 semester units (90-129 quarter units) by the end of the spring term before you transfer to UCLA.

UCLA does not accept applications from students seeking second baccalaureate degrees.

Admission to UCLA is highly selective, as we receive far more applications from qualified students than we can accommodate. For detailed information about the freshman and transfer admission processes, refer to our pages on Freshman Admission and Transfer Admission criteria. We also recommend that you discuss your academic program with your high school or college counselor.

When to apply

UCLA is on the quarter term system with regular sessions in the fall, winter, and spring.

Fall Quarter (September – December)

  • UCLA is open to new students in most undergraduate programs. The regular application filing period for November 1-30.

The deadline to apply to Fall Quarter 2018 has passed. The next opportunity to apply will be for Fall Quarter 2019; the application will be available in August.

Personal Insight Questions

The following are tips to help applicants find appropriate topics, styles, and tones for their answers to the personal insight questions. Please also see the University of California’s instructions.

In your application—including your answers to the personal insight questions—we are looking for evidence of your intellectual curiosity and your interest in personal development. UCLA is a dynamic and exciting place—due largely to our creative, ambitious, and diverse student body. We anticipate that the applicants we admit will contribute to the intellectual vitality, cultural life, and diversity of UCLA.

Your Answers to the Personal Insight Questions

The Basics.

  • These questions are about getting to know you better, so be open, reflective, find your individual voice and express it.
  • Freshman Applicants: You will have 8 questions to choose from, you must respond to any 4 of the 8 questions. The questions you choose to answer are entirely up to you.
  • Transfer Applicants: There is one required question you must answer; then you answer 3 out of 7 additional questions. Which 3 of the 7 you choose to answer are entirely up to you.
  • All applicants: We recommend you select questions that are most relevant to your experience and best reflect your individual circumstances.
  • All questions will be given equal consideration in the application review process, which means there is no advantage or disadvantage to choosing certain questions over others.
  • Each response is limited to a maximum of 350 words.

Tips for Success

Start early.

Give yourself time to think about your topics, and carefully consider the rationale behind each question.

Be clear. Be focused. Be organized.

Make sure your answers to the personal insight questions follow a logical structure. Try to think about how it may seem to an audience who doesn’t know you. Input from people you trust—teachers, friends, relatives—can help you get different perspectives on how your answers to the questions affect those who are reading them.

Be careful with humor and clichés.

What might seem funny or bitingly ironic to you might not seem that way to someone who doesn’t know you. Remember that these questions are an opportunity for you to give us a complete picture of yourself. Don’t allow clichés to speak for you.

Don’t manufacture hardship.

Your answer to a personal insight question isn’t effective simply because it chronicles difficult circumstances. Rather, an effective answer to any question gives us a clear sense of your personal qualities and how you have used and developed them in response to your opportunities and challenges.

Use specific examples to illustrate your ideas.

Most students will answer some of these questions discussing initiative. A much smaller number will show us initiative with concrete examples of demonstrated motivation and leadership. But examples are only one part of the equation: we need you to prove to us with written examples that you have a sense of who you are, where you are going, and how you are going to use your education and your experiences to accomplish your goals. Although some events have long-term or even lifetime ramifications, it is usually better to focus on recent events because they shed more light on who you are right now.

Finally, give yourself plenty of time for revisions.

Read your writing to others, and revise for clarity in content and in style. Pay attention to rules of correct grammar and punctuation, and don’t forget to spell check.

We hope these tips will help you get organized and will inspire you. Your accomplishments, your opinions…you are important! Your answers to these questions are the best tool you have to show us the individual gifts you have to offer to the UCLA community.

Please visit the University of California site for more help with your personal insight questions, including the text of the questions you will be asked to answer.

Special Instructions for Veterans

The University is interested in knowing about your military service. Therefore, you may wish to use the personal insight questions to communicate the following.

  • Describe how your military service has been instrumental in developing your educational plans.
  • Indicate if you are entitled to educational benefits as a result of your own military service to the service connected death or disability of a parent or spouse.
  • Indicate if you are affiliated with the military such as, but not limited to, the spouse or dependent of someone who is on active duty or a current participant in an ROTC-type program.

Spanish-language versions

The UC Personal Insight Guides are also available in Spanish.

Ucla college essay

  • ADMISSION OVERVIEW
  • UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION
  • GRADUATE ADMISSION
  • EXTENSION ENROLLMENT
  • INTERNATIONAL ADMISSION
  • TRANSFER ADMISSION
  • AFFORDABILITY & FINANCIAL AID

It’s a responsibility. As a student, you will be charged with impacting the world from the moment you step on campus. You will be given every resource and opportunity that comes with the second-highest ranked public university in the nation. You will be supported and guided by faculty who are the foremost experts in their field.

Whether you’re enrolling in our undergraduate program or pursuing a graduate degree, UCLA provides a reach and scope of academic experience that has a reputation for producing world-renowned, highly influential, game-changing graduates. They are politicians and Academy Award-winning directors. Olympic gold medalists and Nobel Prize winners. Doctors, scientists, researchers and social activists who aren’t just saving lives—they’re changing life as we know it.

Ucla college essay

  • ADMISSION OVERVIEW
  • UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION
  • GRADUATE ADMISSION
  • EXTENSION ENROLLMENT
  • INTERNATIONAL ADMISSION
  • TRANSFER ADMISSION
  • AFFORDABILITY & FINANCIAL AID

Undergraduate Admission

What are you looking for in a university? Are you hoping to just learn or make an impact? Would you like to leave with a degree or a career?

At UCLA we’re looking for more than straight-A students. You might also be in your high school’s jazz band and the starting point guard on the basketball team. Or perhaps you’re the senior class president and coordinator of a local charity organization. Ideally, you are all these things and more.

And your rich experience brings the type of perspective and leadership we value at UCLA. Continue to Undergraduate Admission

General FAQs

Here are the most common questions we get from students who are considering UCLA.

Q: How DO I APPLY?

Q: When should I apply?

A: Fall quarters (which begin in late September): the usual deadline is November 30 of the prior year.

The deadline to apply to Fall Quarter 2017 has passed. The next opportunity to apply will be for Fall Quarter 2018; the application will be available in August.

Winter quarters: UCLA is not open to new students for winter quarters.

Spring quarters: UCLA is not open to new students for spring quarters.

Q: What are the average GPA and test scores for freshmen admitted to UCLA?

A: These statistics and many more are available on our Freshman Profile page.

This is often the first question prospective freshmen ask us. Many students instinctively focus on GPA and test scores without fully understanding how these numbers are used in our admission process. These statistics are only two of the elements we use in our academic review; we carefully balance many factors to gain a complete sense of an applicant’s achievements.

Here are some of the additional criteria we will use to evaluate your application:

  • The quality, content, and level of college prep courses you have taken throughout your entire high school program, especially coursework completed beyond the minimum University of California subject requirement.
  • The strength of your senior year coursework.
  • The number of and performance in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), school-designated honors, and college courses you have taken, particularly in your junior and senior years.
  • The degree to which you have challenged yourself within the context of your own high school.

So you can see that GPA and test scores are just two of the elements we will examine within the larger context of your academic achievements.

Q: Which counts more in admission decisions–grades or test scores?

A: GPA–combined with the quantity and level of your high school courses–is of primary importance (a strong GPA, for instance, on an academic program that lacks honors level courses or does not include courses well beyond those that meet the basic UC subject requirement, will not likely result in admission). That being said, test scores are still an important element.

First and foremost, you should take the most challenging courses you are able to handle. This is also the best way to prepare for your standardized tests. It is also a good idea to be prepared to take the tests more than once–in other words, don’t wait until your senior year. That way, if you do not perform your best on some tests, you have a chance retake them in the fall of your senior year.

We also find academic strength in AP exams with scores of 3 and above (and IB exams with scores of 5 and above).

It should be noted, however, that because UCLA does not use a mathematical formula when evaluating applicants, there is no fixed numerical weight attached to either GPA or test scores.

Q: Is it easier to be admitted to UCLA as a freshman or as a transfer student?

A: To be admitted as a transfer student is not necessarily harder or easier than being admitted as a freshman; the two paths are different. For freshman applicants we look primarily at the performance in high school and on the standardized tests, whereas transfer applicants do not provide information about their high school curriculum and are not required to take standardized tests. For transfer applicants, the degree of preparation for the major and the college GPA are crucial considerations; strong preference is given to students ready for upper division coursework in their major. Some majors at the transfer level are highly competitive, and preparedness and GPA are even more important for applicants to these majors.

Instead of thinking of freshman vs. transfer admission in terms of "easier" or "harder," we encourage you to reflect upon your own personal circumstances and preparedness for university work when deciding which path to UCLA is more appropriate for you.

Q: What’s the difference between Meeting UC admission requirements and being competitive?

A: The University of California (UC)’s admission requirements depend upon whether you are a freshman or transfer applicant and whether you are a California resident.

Applicants who meet the UC’s admission requirements have at least met the minimum academic preparation necessary for admission to the one of the campuses in the UC system. However, since several UC campuses, including UCLA, receive far more applications from qualified applicants than we have room to accept, students who apply here must exceed these criteria to be a likely candidate for admission. This brings us to the next term–competitive:

Students who are admitted usually have academic achievements far higher than the minimum requirements. So, to gain admission, an applicant must also be "competitive," or among the strongest achieving students to apply. Last year, UCLA admitted approximately 18% of the freshmen who applied.

Q: Does my choice of major have an impact on my chances for admission?

A: For freshmen applying to a major in UCLA’s College of Letters and Science (L&S), choice of major will neither enhance nor diminish their prospects for admission. In fact, a large number of freshman applicants apply as "undeclared." Major is a factor for freshmen applying to non-L&S schools at UCLA (Arts and Architecture; Engineering; Nursing; Theater, Film and Television).

For transfer students, major choice is extremely important for all applicants. Our evaluation of transfer applications is based largely on students’ preparation for the major they select and their GPAs in the completed preparatory courses. We give preference to applicants with strong academic records who will be ready to begin upper division coursework in their major when they enter UCLA.

All applicants–freshman and transfer–should be aware that applicants to majors in the School of the Arts and Architecture; the School of Engineering and Applied Science; the School of Nursing; and the School of Theater, Film and Television are evaluated differently than applicants to the College of Letters and Science:

The majors in the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science are very competitive–especially Bioengineering. All engineering applicants will be expected to have especially strong performances in math and science courses.

The School of Nursing has a separate application in addition to the general UC application that all applicants to the school must complete.

Q: What tips can you give me about answering the personal insight questions?

A: The personal insight questions provide an opportunity for you to tell us more about yourself, your life experiences, and your personal qualities so that we can have a clearer idea of your personal and intellectual development. Applicants must choose four out of eight questions to answer. They give students flexibility and control in what personal stories they want to tell. You should use the personal insight questions to give us a more complete picture of you by augmenting—not repeating—the information elsewhere in the application. The tips we have to offer you are surprisingly straightforward and based on a lot of common sense—the sort that is easily lost under the pressure of the application process.

Q: How can I find out more about the different majors at UCLA?

A: Students are attracted to UCLA for its wealth of distinguished academic and research programs. Six exceptional schools on campus offer undergraduate instruction leading to a Bachelor’s degree. We encourage you to investigate all of them.

Q: Is it better to take a regular-level course and get an A or take an AP course and get a B?

A: We are looking for students who are taking advantage of the opportunities available to them at their schools. IF you have the opportunity to take advanced courses, take them.

The University of California adds extra "weight" to grades received in UC-certified honors, AP/IB, and transferable college courses. (For more information about how letter grades are assigned point values in calculating GPAs, refer to the UC’s page on calculating your GPA.

At UCLA we recognize that honors, AP/IB, and college courses are more rigorous and require high levels of commitment and effort. By choosing the most advanced courses for which you are prepared-and by doing well in them-you can send a powerful message about your desire to challenge yourself in an academic environment and about your preparation for the demands of UCLA’s academic programs.

Q: Which is better to take: honors, AP/IB, or college courses?

A: UC-certified honors, AP/IB, and transferable college courses are equally meritorious in the sense that they are all challenging courses, and they all add extra weight to an applicant’s GPA.

(For more information about the definition of honors-level courses, refer to the UC’s document on honors courses.)

The benefit of an AP/IB course is that it is part of a nationally standardized program culminating in an exam that, if passed, can earn college credit. Similarly, satisfactory grades received in transferable college courses will also earn credit at UCLA. High school honors courses, in contrast, will not earn college credit. If you are still in high school and are interested in completing college courses, you can access a list of UC-transferable courses offered at California community colleges at www.assist.org.

Q: I am getting involved in a lot of extracurricular activities and sometimes I can’t keep up with my classes. Won’t my activities make up for any drop in my grades?

A: Of course, a strong academic performance combined with sustained, meaningful involvement in extracurricular activities is the ideal. But if it comes down to a choice between excelling in your coursework or your extracurricular activities, choose your academics.

Q: What are the best extracurricular activities to be involved in?

A: We do not consider any one kind of extracurricular activity inherently "better" than another. What is important is that students select activities that are truly meaningful to them and that they really get involved with them. We look for long-standing dedication and significant time commitment to an activity, and we notice students’ progression to positions of leadership or recognition of achievement.

Q: Do you have limits on the number of students you can accept from a given high school or community college?

A: No. There is no limit on the number of students UCLA can accept from a given school. Each student is evaluated on the basis of his or her individual achievements and potential for contributing to UCLA. We evaluate freshman applicants in the context of their individual high schools as well as in the context of the applicant pool as a whole. We evaluate transfer applicants based on their preparation and performance within the pool of applicants to their majors as well as in the context of the entire transfer pool. Students should take advantage of all the academic and intellectual opportunities available to them in their schools and communities.

Q: How many out-of-state and international students apply to UCLA, and how many are admitted?

A: UCLA received almost 35,000 freshman applications from out-of-state and international freshman applicants for the fall 2015 term. Over 6,500 of them were admitted. Since UCLA is a state-supported institution, the vast majority (about 90%) of our undergraduates are California residents. UCLA, however, enrolls students from all 50 states and from over 100 countries.

Q: How can I get on UCLA’s admissions mailing list?

A: You can sign up to receive e-mails for prospective students here. We also maintain a General Information Library which contains PDF versions of all our print publications.

UCLA Admissions Essays

These college essays are from students who got accepted at University of California – Los Angeles. Use them to get inspiration for your own essays and knock the socks off those admissions officers!

1. The World I Come From

It is incredible how social environment plays such a great role in a person’s holistic development. It is like the butterfly effect on an individual, yet grand scale. Each decision is like a ripple that spreads out uniformly, increases many fold, and eventually changes the person’s futur.

2. Resource in Mind

I only allow myself to watch one movie in theatres every year. Although some people may view me as cheap, my frugal nature has been a strong source of my self-identity. This sense of resourcefulness is apparent throughout my family’s activities, whether it is cooking our own dinner or bargaini.

3. Education is my life

Many scholars have come up with different definitions for the concept of education. Some motivational speakers call it “the key to success”. Others refer to it as the backbone of our society. Many leaders, especially duri.

Essays That Worked

Read the top 3 college essays that worked at UCLA and more. Learn more.

University of California – Los Angeles Facts

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) is a public research university located in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, United States. It is the second-oldest of the general-education campuses of the University of California system. UCLA is considered a Public Ivy of the UC.

UCLA Stats

  • 18.6% acceptance rate
  • 43,239 enrolled students
  • $12,753 tuition & fees
  • #23 in US News & World Report

Located in Los Angeles, CA

  • 108,029 views

To teach is to learn twice. Joseph Joubert

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What is Study Notes?

That’s easy — it’s the best way to study for AP classes and AP exams! StudyNotes offers fast, free study tools for AP students. Our AP study guides, practice tests, and notes are the best on the web because they’re contributed by students and teachers like yourself. Always 100% free.

General FAQs

Here are the most common questions we get from students who are considering UCLA.

Q: How DO I APPLY?

Q: When should I apply?

A: Fall quarters (which begin in late September): the usual deadline is November 30 of the prior year.

The deadline to apply to Fall Quarter 2017 has passed. The next opportunity to apply will be for Fall Quarter 2018; the application will be available in August.

Winter quarters: UCLA is not open to new students for winter quarters.

Spring quarters: UCLA is not open to new students for spring quarters.

Q: What are the average GPA and test scores for freshmen admitted to UCLA?

A: These statistics and many more are available on our Freshman Profile page.

This is often the first question prospective freshmen ask us. Many students instinctively focus on GPA and test scores without fully understanding how these numbers are used in our admission process. These statistics are only two of the elements we use in our academic review; we carefully balance many factors to gain a complete sense of an applicant’s achievements.

Here are some of the additional criteria we will use to evaluate your application:

  • The quality, content, and level of college prep courses you have taken throughout your entire high school program, especially coursework completed beyond the minimum University of California subject requirement.
  • The strength of your senior year coursework.
  • The number of and performance in Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), school-designated honors, and college courses you have taken, particularly in your junior and senior years.
  • The degree to which you have challenged yourself within the context of your own high school.

So you can see that GPA and test scores are just two of the elements we will examine within the larger context of your academic achievements.

Q: Which counts more in admission decisions–grades or test scores?

A: GPA–combined with the quantity and level of your high school courses–is of primary importance (a strong GPA, for instance, on an academic program that lacks honors level courses or does not include courses well beyond those that meet the basic UC subject requirement, will not likely result in admission). That being said, test scores are still an important element.

First and foremost, you should take the most challenging courses you are able to handle. This is also the best way to prepare for your standardized tests. It is also a good idea to be prepared to take the tests more than once–in other words, don’t wait until your senior year. That way, if you do not perform your best on some tests, you have a chance retake them in the fall of your senior year.

We also find academic strength in AP exams with scores of 3 and above (and IB exams with scores of 5 and above).

It should be noted, however, that because UCLA does not use a mathematical formula when evaluating applicants, there is no fixed numerical weight attached to either GPA or test scores.

Q: Is it easier to be admitted to UCLA as a freshman or as a transfer student?

A: To be admitted as a transfer student is not necessarily harder or easier than being admitted as a freshman; the two paths are different. For freshman applicants we look primarily at the performance in high school and on the standardized tests, whereas transfer applicants do not provide information about their high school curriculum and are not required to take standardized tests. For transfer applicants, the degree of preparation for the major and the college GPA are crucial considerations; strong preference is given to students ready for upper division coursework in their major. Some majors at the transfer level are highly competitive, and preparedness and GPA are even more important for applicants to these majors.

Instead of thinking of freshman vs. transfer admission in terms of "easier" or "harder," we encourage you to reflect upon your own personal circumstances and preparedness for university work when deciding which path to UCLA is more appropriate for you.

Q: What’s the difference between Meeting UC admission requirements and being competitive?

A: The University of California (UC)’s admission requirements depend upon whether you are a freshman or transfer applicant and whether you are a California resident.

Applicants who meet the UC’s admission requirements have at least met the minimum academic preparation necessary for admission to the one of the campuses in the UC system. However, since several UC campuses, including UCLA, receive far more applications from qualified applicants than we have room to accept, students who apply here must exceed these criteria to be a likely candidate for admission. This brings us to the next term–competitive:

Students who are admitted usually have academic achievements far higher than the minimum requirements. So, to gain admission, an applicant must also be "competitive," or among the strongest achieving students to apply. Last year, UCLA admitted approximately 18% of the freshmen who applied.

Q: Does my choice of major have an impact on my chances for admission?

A: For freshmen applying to a major in UCLA’s College of Letters and Science (L&S), choice of major will neither enhance nor diminish their prospects for admission. In fact, a large number of freshman applicants apply as "undeclared." Major is a factor for freshmen applying to non-L&S schools at UCLA (Arts and Architecture; Engineering; Nursing; Theater, Film and Television).

For transfer students, major choice is extremely important for all applicants. Our evaluation of transfer applications is based largely on students’ preparation for the major they select and their GPAs in the completed preparatory courses. We give preference to applicants with strong academic records who will be ready to begin upper division coursework in their major when they enter UCLA.

All applicants–freshman and transfer–should be aware that applicants to majors in the School of the Arts and Architecture; the School of Engineering and Applied Science; the School of Nursing; and the School of Theater, Film and Television are evaluated differently than applicants to the College of Letters and Science:

The majors in the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science are very competitive–especially Bioengineering. All engineering applicants will be expected to have especially strong performances in math and science courses.

The School of Nursing has a separate application in addition to the general UC application that all applicants to the school must complete.

Q: What tips can you give me about answering the personal insight questions?

A: The personal insight questions provide an opportunity for you to tell us more about yourself, your life experiences, and your personal qualities so that we can have a clearer idea of your personal and intellectual development. Applicants must choose four out of eight questions to answer. They give students flexibility and control in what personal stories they want to tell. You should use the personal insight questions to give us a more complete picture of you by augmenting—not repeating—the information elsewhere in the application. The tips we have to offer you are surprisingly straightforward and based on a lot of common sense—the sort that is easily lost under the pressure of the application process.

Q: How can I find out more about the different majors at UCLA?

A: Students are attracted to UCLA for its wealth of distinguished academic and research programs. Six exceptional schools on campus offer undergraduate instruction leading to a Bachelor’s degree. We encourage you to investigate all of them.

Q: Is it better to take a regular-level course and get an A or take an AP course and get a B?

A: We are looking for students who are taking advantage of the opportunities available to them at their schools. IF you have the opportunity to take advanced courses, take them.

The University of California adds extra "weight" to grades received in UC-certified honors, AP/IB, and transferable college courses. (For more information about how letter grades are assigned point values in calculating GPAs, refer to the UC’s page on calculating your GPA.

At UCLA we recognize that honors, AP/IB, and college courses are more rigorous and require high levels of commitment and effort. By choosing the most advanced courses for which you are prepared-and by doing well in them-you can send a powerful message about your desire to challenge yourself in an academic environment and about your preparation for the demands of UCLA’s academic programs.

Q: Which is better to take: honors, AP/IB, or college courses?

A: UC-certified honors, AP/IB, and transferable college courses are equally meritorious in the sense that they are all challenging courses, and they all add extra weight to an applicant’s GPA.

(For more information about the definition of honors-level courses, refer to the UC’s document on honors courses.)

The benefit of an AP/IB course is that it is part of a nationally standardized program culminating in an exam that, if passed, can earn college credit. Similarly, satisfactory grades received in transferable college courses will also earn credit at UCLA. High school honors courses, in contrast, will not earn college credit. If you are still in high school and are interested in completing college courses, you can access a list of UC-transferable courses offered at California community colleges at www.assist.org.

Q: I am getting involved in a lot of extracurricular activities and sometimes I can’t keep up with my classes. Won’t my activities make up for any drop in my grades?

A: Of course, a strong academic performance combined with sustained, meaningful involvement in extracurricular activities is the ideal. But if it comes down to a choice between excelling in your coursework or your extracurricular activities, choose your academics.

Q: What are the best extracurricular activities to be involved in?

A: We do not consider any one kind of extracurricular activity inherently "better" than another. What is important is that students select activities that are truly meaningful to them and that they really get involved with them. We look for long-standing dedication and significant time commitment to an activity, and we notice students’ progression to positions of leadership or recognition of achievement.

Q: Do you have limits on the number of students you can accept from a given high school or community college?

A: No. There is no limit on the number of students UCLA can accept from a given school. Each student is evaluated on the basis of his or her individual achievements and potential for contributing to UCLA. We evaluate freshman applicants in the context of their individual high schools as well as in the context of the applicant pool as a whole. We evaluate transfer applicants based on their preparation and performance within the pool of applicants to their majors as well as in the context of the entire transfer pool. Students should take advantage of all the academic and intellectual opportunities available to them in their schools and communities.

Q: How many out-of-state and international students apply to UCLA, and how many are admitted?

A: UCLA received almost 35,000 freshman applications from out-of-state and international freshman applicants for the fall 2015 term. Over 6,500 of them were admitted. Since UCLA is a state-supported institution, the vast majority (about 90%) of our undergraduates are California residents. UCLA, however, enrolls students from all 50 states and from over 100 countries.

Q: How can I get on UCLA’s admissions mailing list?

A: You can sign up to receive e-mails for prospective students here. We also maintain a General Information Library which contains PDF versions of all our print publications.

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