Uconn essay (order an essay inexpensively)

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UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT

Admission Requirements

Freshman applicants should be attending an approved high school program. Upon graduation, a minimum of 16 units, with 15 in college preparatory work, must be completed. The following college preparatory courses are required for all freshman applicants.

  • 4 years of English
  • 3 years of math (algebra I, algebra II, and geometry)
  • 2 years of social studies (including 1 year of U.S. history)
  • 2 years of a single foreign language (3 years strongly recommended)*
  • 2 years of laboratory science
  • 3 years of electives
  • School of Engineering & School of Nursing applicants: high school chemistry and physics are required.

*Two years of a documented foreign language, that is not English, without level repetition is required.

University of Connecticut

Office of Undergraduate Admissions

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT

Freshman Applicants

Your pathway to UConn Nation starts here. Freshman applicants must apply online through either the Common Application or the Coalition Application. Admission notification begins March 1 for fall applicants.

Class of 2021 at

Storrs Main Campus

Middle 50% of Enrolled Students

University of Connecticut

Office of Undergraduate Admissions

University of Connecticut Undergraduate College Application Essays

These University of Connecticut college application essays were written by students accepted at University of Connecticut. All of our sample college essays include the question prompt and the year written. Please use these sample admission essays responsibly.

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College Application Essays accepted by University of Connecticut

Culture Shock Anonymous

University of Connecticut

I wake up occasionally to the sound of a rooster crowing. I live in Hartford, the only real city in Connecticut and I wake to the sound of a rooster crowing. I am alone when I wake up and there is sunlight pouring into the room. I know when I go.

Value of Diversity Anonymous

University of Connecticut

There simply was no solution. With tears of frustration in my eyes I went through the options for the hundredth time. I had come face to face with one of life’s many brutal truths: no one can build a sand-castle by herself. About to give up in.

Northville-Lake Placid Trail Dylan Brown

University of Connecticut

Two years ago at summer camp, I hiked the better part of the Northville-Lake Placid Trail.

No one from camp had gone on this trip since some time in the seventies, so we had a certain air of bravado. We were a group of 14 and 15 year olds.

New People, New Dreams Amanda Grewer

University of Connecticut

“I think we’re lost,” I said to my parents as I stood on the corner of 114th Street and Broadway carrying a large bag of luggage. I stopped confused as to where I was going. I knew I was close; I could tell by the number of people wearing Columbia.

A Fork Rose Tran

University of Connecticut

I have encountered a fork. Should I again submit to my father’s demands as I am sent to the kitchen to serve or should I refuse and risk tainting my role as the ideal Vietnamese daughter? I succumb, and fetch a repulsive-smelling platter of duck.

A Student Ambassador Rose Tran

University of Connecticut

I stood in front of a fourth grade classroom, all eyes fixed on me. For some reason, I felt nervous, as if I were bare, exposing all my past secrets to the world of susceptible minds. I held up the book The Colors of Freedom, explaining that it.

My Bare Feet Amanda Potts

University of Connecticut

There was something about the feeling of that squishy muck squirting through my toes after a heavy rainfall that simply made me feel alive. Or to feel the gritty road pushing against every inch of my sole and the rough gravel digging into my.

A Dream Benjamin Gordon

University of Connecticut

I had a dream last night that my most revered mentors came together to weave their unique threads into the fabric that ultimately became my Common Application essay.

Kurt Vonnegut, my favorite novelist, was in charge of the introduction to this.

An Intellectually Stimulating experience Anonymous

University of Connecticut

I woke up that morning with a feeling of dread. As I raced down to the bus stop through the twilight of the early morning, I felt my heart palpitating with anticipation and worry. Every second that the bus brought me closer to New Haven, my fear.

Discovering Beauty Within a Book's Bindings Katherine Berke

University of Connecticut

I often find myself momentarily stunned by small, jewel-like moments that make up this life. For this I must thank books.

I always loved to read, for reading allowed me to contemplate life in a way that reality never did. The novelty lay, I think.

Failure -Is That Still a Thing? Anonymous

University of Connecticut

I don’t believe in failure. I don’t believe that it is possible to mess something up so entirely that nothing good can come of it. If I make a mistake, I learn from it. If I’m not as good as I want to be at something, I work that much harder at.

On Spending a Lot of Time with Old Women Danielle Agugliaro

University of Connecticut

I round the corner into my cubicle and toss my coat on my chair. I chat with April as my computer starts up, and then check my Threads calendar, which is riddled with deadlines. My day could be filled with writing blog posts, driving over to help.

"Really? You want to be an engineer?" Anonymous

University of Connecticut

Today there is a common misconception that gender inequality no longer exists. Yet Stephanie Coontz of the New York Times has analyzed the data and, for me at least, put this misconception to rest in her article “The Myth of Male Decline.” She.

Finding My Purpose Anonymous

University of Connecticut

As I walked through the door there she stood, staring into oblivion with a dazed look on her face. Alice was my first Adaptive student, and the only discernible sound that she emitted was “ribbit.” I was intrigued, but not surprised, because the.

My Cake Anonymous

University of Connecticut

I guarantee I can make you the perfect cake. Not just a delicious cake, or an overly expensive looking cake – I’ll make one you’ll have to love because it will reflect you as an individual. It’s a pretty rare talent, the skills for which took me.

Being A Detective in Life Anonymous

University of Connecticut

“When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth”. – Quote from The Sign of the Four by Arthur Conan Doyle.

Addicted to detective fiction, I’m a fan of Sherlock Holmes, deeply absorbed in Sherlock’s.

Mad About Medicine Anonymous

University of Connecticut

His skin detached from its threadlike bindings to unveil a unique color palette. Excess blood flooded the area, only to be extracted by a contraption of assorted tubes. Muscle tissue, each fiber visible, danced around bones and ligaments to the.

One Duck At A Time Ciara Chaves

University of Connecticut

Salmon Point beach and campground in Bridgton, Maine on that early summer morning was idyllic, with maroon picnic tables staggered along the lake’s edge and sand bridging the distance. A simplistic playground with a swing set and some monkey bars.

Recent Questions about University of Connecticut

The Question and Answer section for University of Connecticut is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

UConn Requirements for Admission

Choose Your Test

What are UConn’s admission requirements? While there are a lot of pieces that go into a college application, you should focus on only a few critical things:

In this guide we’ll cover what you need to get into UConn and build a strong application.

School location: Storrs, CT

This school is also known as: University of Connecticut

Admissions Rate: 50%

If you want to get in, the first thing to look at is the acceptance rate. This tells you how competitive the school is and how serious their requirements are.

The acceptance rate at UConn is 50%. For every 100 applicants, 50 are admitted.

This means the school is moderately selective. The school expects you to meet their requirements for GPA and SAT/ACT scores, but they’re more flexible than other schools. If you exceed their requirements, you have an excellent chance of getting in. But if you don’t, you might be one of the unlucky minority that gets a rejection letter.

UConn GPA Requirements

Many schools specify a minimum GPA requirement, but this is often just the bare minimum to submit an application without immediately getting rejected.

The GPA requirement that really matters is the GPA you need for a real chance of getting in. For this, we look at the school’s average GPA for its current students.

Average GPA: 3.67

(Most schools use a weighted GPA out of 4.0, though some report an unweighted GPA. This school did not officially report its average GPA, but we’ve estimated it here using data from over 1,000 schools.)

With a GPA of 3.67, UConn requires you to be above average in your high school class. You’ll need at least a mix of A’s and B’s, with more A’s than B’s. You can compensate for a lower GPA with harder classes, like AP or IB classes. This will show that you’re able to handle more difficult academics than the average high school student.

If you’re currently a junior or senior, your GPA is hard to change in time for college applications. If your GPA is at or below the school average of 3.67, you’ll need a higher SAT or ACT score to compensate. This will help you compete effectively against other applicants who have higher GPAs than you.

SAT and ACT Requirements

Each school has different requirements for standardized testing. Most schools require the SAT or ACT, and many also require SAT subject tests.

You must take either the SAT or ACT to submit an application to UConn. More importantly, you need to do well to have a strong application.

UConn SAT Requirements

Many schools say they have no SAT score cutoff, but the truth is that there is a hidden SAT requirement. This is based on the school’s average score.

Average SAT: 1300 (Old: 1839)

The average SAT score composite at UConn is a 1300 on the 1600 SAT scale.

On the old 2400 SAT, this corresponds to an average SAT score of 1839.

This score makes UConn Moderately Competitive for SAT test scores.

UConn SAT Score Analysis (New 1600 SAT)

The 25th percentile New SAT score is 1220, and the 75th percentile New SAT score is 1410. In other words, a 1220 on the New SAT places you below average, while a 1410 will move you up to above average.

Here’s the breakdown of new SAT scores by section:

UConn SAT Score Analysis (Old 2400 SAT)

The 25th percentile Old SAT score is 1700, and the 75th percentile SAT score is 2010. In other words, a 1700 on the Old SAT places you below average, while a 2010 puts you well above average.

Here’s the breakdown of old SAT scores by section:

SAT Score Choice Policy

The Score Choice policy at your school is an important part of your testing strategy.

UConn has the Score Choice policy of “Highest Section.”

This is also known as “superscoring.” This means that you can choose which SAT tests you want to send to the school. Of all the scores they receive, your application readers will consider your highest section scores across all SAT test dates you submit.

Click below to learn more about how superscoring critically affects your test strategy.

For example, say you submit the following 3 test scores:

Even though the highest total you scored on any one test date was 1000, UConn will take your highest section score from all your test dates, then combine them to form your Superscore. You can raise your composite score from 1000 to 1400 in this example.

This is important for your testing strategy. Because you can choose which tests to send in, and UConn forms your Superscore, you can take the SAT as many times as you want, then submit only the tests that give you the highest Superscore. Your application readers will only see that one score.

Therefore, if your SAT superscore is currently below a 1300, we strongly recommend that you consider prepping for the SAT and retaking it. You have a very good chance of raising your score, which will significantly boost your chances of getting in.

Even better, because of the Superscore, you can focus all your energy on a single section at a time. If your Reading score is lower than your other sections, prep only for the Reading section, then take the SAT. Then focus on Math for the next test, and so on. This will surely give you the highest Superscore possible.

Download our free guide on the top 5 strategies you must be using to improve your score. This guide was written by Harvard graduates and SAT perfect scorers. If you apply the strategies in this guide, you’ll study smarter and make huge score improvements.

UConn ACT Requirements

Just like for the SAT, UConn likely doesn’t have a hard ACT cutoff, but if you score too low, your application will get tossed in the trash.

Average ACT: 28

The average ACT score at UConn is 28. This score makes UConn Moderately Competitive for ACT scores.

The 25th percentile ACT score is 26, and the 75th percentile ACT score is 30.

Even though UConn likely says they have no minimum ACT requirement, if you apply with a 26 or below, you’ll have a harder time getting in, unless you have something else impressive in your application.

ACT Score Sending Policy

If you’re taking the ACT as opposed to the SAT, you have a huge advantage in how you send scores, and this dramatically affects your testing strategy.

Here it is: when you send ACT scores to colleges, you have absolute control over which tests you send. You could take 10 tests, and only send your highest one. This is unlike the SAT, where many schools require you to send all your tests ever taken.

This means that you have more chances than you think to improve your ACT score. To try to aim for the school’s ACT requirement of 28 and above, you should try to take the ACT as many times as you can. When you have the final score that you’re happy with, you can then send only that score to all your schools.

ACT Superscore Policy

By and large, most colleges do not superscore the ACT. (Superscore means that the school takes your best section scores from all the test dates you submit, and then combines them into the best possible composite score). Thus, most schools will just take your highest ACT score from a single sitting.

However, from our research, UConn is understood to superscore the ACT. We couldn’t confirm it directly from the school’s admissions website, but multiple sources confirm that the school does superscore the ACT. We recommend you call their admissions office directly for more information.

Superscoring is powerful to your testing strategy, and you need to make sure you plan your testing accordingly. Of all the scores that UConn receives, your application readers will consider your highest section scores across all ACT test dates you submit.

Click below to learn more about how superscoring critically affects your test strategy.

For example, say you submit the following 4 test scores:

Even though the highest ACT composite you scored on any one test date was 20, UConn will take your highest section score from all your test dates, then combine them to form your Superscore. You can raise your composite score from 20 to 32 in this example.

This is important for your testing strategy. Because you can choose which tests to send in, and UConn forms your Superscore, you can take the ACT as many times as you want, then submit only the tests that give you the highest Superscore. Your application readers will only see that one score.

Therefore, if your ACT score is currently below a 28, we strongly recommend that you consider prepping for the ACT and retaking it. You have a very good chance of raising your score, which will significantly boost your chances of getting in.

Even better, because of the Superscore, you can focus all your energy on a single section at a time. If your Reading score is lower than your other sections, prep only for the Reading section, then take the ACT. Then focus on Math for the next test, and so on. This will surely give you the highest Superscore possible.

Download our free guide on the top 5 strategies you must be using to improve your score. This guide was written by Harvard graduates and ACT perfect scorers. If you apply the strategies in this guide, you’ll study smarter and make huge score improvements.

SAT/ACT Writing Section Requirements

Both the SAT and ACT have a Writing section that includes an essay.

UConn requires you to take the SAT/ACT Writing section. They’ll use this as another factor in their admissions consideration.

SAT Subject Test Requirements

Schools vary in their SAT subject test requirements. Typically, selective schools tend to require them, while most schools in the country do not.

We did not find information that UConn requires SAT subject tests, and so most likely it does not. At least 6 months before applying, you should still doublecheck just to make sure, so you have enough time to take the test.

Our Expert’s Notes

We did more detailed research into this school and found the following information.

The ACT is not required with writing, and the SAT writing scores are not weighted in the application process. Focus on maximizing your SAT Math and Critical Reading scores, or your ACT composite.

Final Admissions Verdict

Because this school is moderately selective, strong academic performance will almost guarantee you admission. Scoring a 2010 SAT or a 30 ACT or above will nearly guarantee you admission. Because the school admits 50% of all applicants, being far above average raises the admission rate for you to nearly 100%.

If you can achieve a high SAT/ACT score, the rest of your application essentially doesn’t matter. You still need to meet the rest of the application requirements, and your GPA shouldn’t be too far off from the school average of 3.67. But you won’t need dazzling extracurriculars and breathtaking letters of recommendation to get in. You can get in based on the merits of your score alone.

But if your score is a 1700 SAT or a 26 ACT and below, you have a good chance of being one of the unlucky few to be rejected.

Admissions Calculator

Here’s our custom admissions calculator. Plug in your numbers to see what your chances of getting in are.

How would your chances improve with a better score?

Try to take your current SAT score and add 160 points (or take your ACT score and add 4 points) to the calculator above. See how much your chances improve?

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Application Requirements

Every school requires an application with the bare essentials – high school transcript and GPA, application form, and other core information. Many schools, as explained above, also require SAT and ACT scores, as well as letters of recommendation, application essays, and interviews. We’ll cover the exact requirements of UConn here.

Application Requirements Overview

  • Common Application Accepted
  • Universal Application Not accepted
  • Electronic Application Available
  • Essay or Personal Statement Required for all freshmen
  • Letters of Recommendation 2
  • Interview Not required
  • Application Fee $80
  • Fee Waiver Available? Available
  • Other Notes

Testing Requirements

  • SAT or ACT Required
  • SAT or ACT Writing Required
  • SAT Subject Tests
  • Scores Due in Office January 15

Coursework Requirements

  • Subject Required Years
  • English 4
  • Math 3
  • Science 2
  • Foreign Language 2
  • Social Studies 2
  • History
  • Electives 3

Deadlines and Early Admissions

    • Offered? Deadline Notification
  • Regular Admission
    • Yes January 15 March 1
  • Early Action
    • No
  • Early Decision
    • No

Admissions Office Information

Our Expert’s Notes

We did more detailed research into this school’s admissions process and found the following information:

You will be automatically considered for most merit scholarships and the Honors College, but it is recommended you apply by December 1st to maximize your chances. UConn also has special programs in Law, Medicine, and Dentistry that require additional application materials and have a December 1 deadline. Read more about deadlines here. There are two full-ride scholarships available to Connecticut students only. For consideration, you need a nomination for a school official and you must submit your application by November 1.

Other Schools For You

If you’re interested in UConn, you’ll probably be interested in these schools as well. We’ve divided them into 3 categories depending on how hard they are to get into, relative to UConn.

Reach Schools: Harder to Get Into

These schools are more selective and have higher scores than UConn. If you improve your SAT score, you’ll be competitive for these schools.

Same Level: Equally Hard to Get Into

If you’re competitive for UConn, these schools will offer you a similar chance of admission.

Safety Schools: Easier to Get Into

If you’re currently competitive for UConn, you should have no problem getting into these schools. If UConn is currently out of your reach, you might already be competitive for these schools.

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