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University of Florida Undergraduate College Application Essays

These University of Florida college application essays were written by students accepted at University of Florida. All of our sample college essays include the question prompt and the year written. Please use these sample admission essays responsibly.

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College Application Essays accepted by University of Florida

An Eye-Opening Experience Josh Weiss

University of Florida

On November 18, 2000, a group of my friends and I returned home from my birthday dinner at a local steakhouse. Upon our arrival, it was suggested that we watch the movie Fight Club. As if it were meant to be, we discovered that Fight Club was to.

The Means By Which I Better My Community Josh Weiss

University of Florida

In order to contribute to a community of any size or structure, some aspect of said community must be made better. This can be something as simple as cleaning up refuse or as profound as changing the way people live their lives. Regardless of the.

Experiences and Personality Wes Neuman

University of Florida

Personal Statement Choice #1

Swimming has been the main focus of my life since I was 8 months old, when I first learned how to swim. In 1988, I was part of the Senate Safety Council on whether or not to teach infants how to swim. From learning how.

Individuality Anonymous

University of Florida

Essentially, individuality is a product of nature and nurture. I believe that one’s individuality, comprised of many factors, ultimately predicts their later success and influence. A product of my environment, my unique upbringing has affected my.

A loss that has changed me for the better Anonymous

University of Florida

I always looked forward to June 17, the birthday of my only living grandparent. Every year I spent the day composing corny jokes that made her to snort with laughter and murmur loving approval. But in 2002, in a matter of seconds, my associations.

Who I Am Salvador Bou

University of Florida

I credit the development of my personal values to my parents and culture. My parents were raised in Puerto Rico, where they became medical doctors. While my father came from a college educated family, my mother did not. Overcoming deep economic.

Running Child Anonymous

University of Florida

Although my tale is about a basketball player, it is not about a six-foot-eleven athlete whose name is splashed across the sports pages of daily newspapers and whose picture graces the tops of Nike and Adidas boxes. Rather, this is a story of one.

A Journey Through Perdition Hilary Jewel Lange

University of Florida

I stood on the ground where millions of innocent people perished. I walked into a gas chamber, and I walked out. I saw the scratch marks on the walls where people were clawing their way to the top, trying to get one last gasp of oxygen as the.

Crossing the Chasm Anonymous

University of Florida

A crowd of people forms at the entrance of the Eastside High School Gym. A five-foot-eleven, one-hundred-and-sixty-pound, curly-haired freshman shyly makes his way into the sea of faces. Today is tryouts for the Eastside basketball team. Eastside.

Finding Purpose Anonymous

University of Florida

We were inches from the edge; they were shouting “Dale la vuelta! Dale la vuelta!” (“Go around!”). Unless they moved their truck forward, we would plunge to our deaths, our tires were beginning to slip over the edge of the 2,000-foot cliff.

Pipo Sara Claro Piwko

University of Florida

I’ve lived with my grandparents all my life. My grandfather, whom I call “Pipo,” is like a father to me, and he is absolutely, no-doubt-about-it my favorite person in the world. He is intrigued by everything academic and has a photographic memory.

Warmth of a Smile Anonymous

University of Florida

My annual trips to Pakistan can be summarized with the use of a few basic words, including eating, sleeping, shopping, and complaining. If the car didn’t have a fully-operating AC system, I’d curse the people and their lack of technological.

A Modern Holocaust Anonymous

University of Florida

Countless books, documentaries, and museums recount the story of the Jewish Holocaust. Comparatively few people, however, have heard of the modern holocaust that took place in Indonesia twelve years ago in my hometown of Jakarta.

Family Builds Character Anonymous

University of Florida

I left my house on the first day of middle school wondering if I would fit in and if my iPod was fully charged. By the end of the day I was wondering if my mother would be alive by the time I got to seventh grade. I still vividly remember parts of.

Becoming One of Them Taylor Dougherty

University of Florida

Kicking rocks as I trudged down the windy path to my undesired destination, I heard my dad loading the obnoxious sounding cars onto the ramp. Every time I looked at the vehicle I was being forced to ride in, I couldn’t help but be embarrassed. My.

Spain Awaits Anonymous

University of Florida

I get off of the train into the piercingly cold winter morning, anxious, not knowing what to expect. “So who am I supposed to be looking for?” I think as I nervously scan my surroundings. After a draining 20 hour flight and train ride to get to a.

4'11 Forever Anonymous

University of Florida

When my mom gave birth to me, I weighed in at nine and a half pounds and measured twenty-two inches. One could say I was pretty big for a newborn, but whenever I tell this story, it is soon followed by a: “And that’s pretty much when I stopped.

My Life Jordan Williams

University of Florida

“Jooooorrrrddddannnnn,” my mom screamed with utter fear and panic in her voice. Surprisingly, amongst all of the chaos, her voice was all that I heard. I’m not sure if I was disoriented, bewildered or just in complete shock but at that particular.

Moving Forward Felipe Parodi

University of Florida

As the new student in my sixth grade English class, I was asked where I was from. “Where is your home?” a classmate inquired. As I opened my mouth to answer, I was struck by the sudden realization that there was no particular place that I was able.

The Backyard Anonymous

University of Florida

I remember when the flowers stopped blooming.

All throughout my childhood there was always one thing that would instantly make me happy. I had a beautiful backyard in my childhood home. The smell of the ripe red mango trees and the chirping of the.

Playground Andrew Elsakr

University of Florida

There was one playground not too far from my grandparents’ apartment in Cairo (the summer home of my childhood) where I wasn’t treated like the quirky, abnormal kid that I was used to being. It wasn’t your ideal picture of a playground, though.

The Good Life Nicole Relics

University of Florida

Warm, fluffy bread — because Romanians cannot eat any meal without it. Pillowy pumpkin spinach ravioli — a recipe my mother got from a chef in Italy in exchange for her strudel recipe. And apple pie — because the U.S. makes the best. This could.

St. Elmo's Fire Anonymous

University of Florida

As a child, I was obsessed with 80’s movies. I admired Ferris Bueller’s infectious charisma and fearless confidence. I dreamed of having my own Jake Ryan waiting outside the church, grinning an impish smile while standing by his cool red Porsche.

UF Butterfly Garden Gaitana Jaramillo

University of Florida

The University of Florida’s butterfly and moth exhibit houses more than 10 million variations of 10 million species! When I read that fact I couldn’t believe it. Each critter displayed in those glass cases is completely unique; now multiply that.

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Recent Questions about University of Florida

The Question and Answer section for University of Florida is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

The 2016-2017 University of Florida Essay Prompts

Beginning with the 2016-2017 admissions cycle, the University of Florida will use the Coalition Application for the freshman application. These essays have a maximum word count of 500 words. Here are the prompts.

  1. Tell a story from your life, describing an experience that either demonstrates your character or helped to shape it.
  2. Describe a time when you made a meaningful contribution to others in which the greater good was your focus. Discuss the challenges and rewards of making your contribution.
  3. Has there been a time when you’ve had a long-cherished or accepted belief challenged? How did you respond? How did the challenge affect your beliefs?
  4. What is the hardest part of being a teenager now? What’s the best part? What advice would you give a younger sibling or friend (assuming they would listen to you)?
  5. Submit an essay on a topic of your choice.

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With a wealth of experience as a writer, journalist, and educator, Robert Schwartz has written for all four major television networks. In the feature film world he has written or rewritten screenplays for all of the major movie studios.

Our Tips on Writing Your College Essay

Posted on Sep 25, 2017

Renee Buchanan

Renee Buchanan is communications manager for the Division of Enrollment Management. She has worked for the University of Florida for 22 years as a magazine writer and editor, medical alumni director, academic catalog editor, and designer for print and web.

The essay should not be the most dreaded part of the application process for any university. Maybe these tips will help you find that you can do this writing task with ease.

1. Tell Your Story In Your Own Voice.

Now is the time to market yourself to the best of your ability. Your college essay gives our admissions officers an insight into what makes you unique beyond your high school grades, test scores and extracurriculars. Your essay tells us how you will add something to UF’s freshman class, what you can bring to our community of leaders, learners and thinkers, and what sets you apart. This is the story of YOU!

2. Does the Essay Matter?

UF will receive more than 30,000 applications for the approximate 6,500 seats in the freshman class. There will be many outstanding students with similar scores and grades—too many to admit. Your essay helps us learn what makes you unique from other equally talented students.

3. Who Reads ‘Em?

Various officers throughout the UF Division of Enrollment Management are trained to read essays, and each essay will be read at least twice by randomly assigned readers. Keep in mind that these individuals may read more than a thousand essays, so it is important to try to catch the readers’ attention quickly with the most interesting example or point at the beginning of the essay. Here’s an example:

When I was in high school, I played the violin in the high school band. It was my favorite activity, and I never missed a practice or a performance. But one day, to my horror, I left my thousand-dollar violin on the school bus…

(from the book, Heavenly Essays)

4. Make the Story Unique to You

If you believe 10 or 20 or 100 students could write your exact essay, then it’s time to rethink your topic. Work on being distinctive. Here are some overused topics that essay readers have seen many (many) times:

  • Winning or losing the big game
  • Loss of friendships or relationships
  • Critiques of others (classmates, parents)
  • Pet deaths
  • Summer vacations

Think about what you would say in three to five minutes to a total stranger to impress or inform them about your terrific qualities or unusual experiences.

5. Show and Tell—Be Vivid with Your Words

If you recall show and tell at school, your essay should follow the same principle. Remember when the student went to the front of the class with something of interest inside the plastic sack? You hear the story. You see the object. With essays, you need to draw the reader out beyond the straight text and use words that trigger imagery and the senses.

6. Big Words Are Just Big Words.

Impress us with your content and who you are; not your ability to use a thesaurus. Most of our readers would prefer if you wrote, “I hung out with a group of friends” instead of, “we congregated as a conglomerate of like-minded individuals”.

7. Don’t Repeat.

Don’t repeat what you’ve already supplied in your application—grades, test scores, etc. Your essay serves to fill in the blanks beyond what you have supplied.

8. This is your essay, not your English class.

We will be reading your essay more for your words and information and less for your grammar. We know you’ve learned to limit use of contractions, eliminate sentence fragments and not to split your infinitives. However, no text-lingo, such as “lol” “ttyl” “kk” etc. We won’t judge you heavily on grammar, but we ask that you keep it appropriately professional. Pick up a best-selling book, and you’ll find that many authors no longer write by the rules. It’s your story that counts!

9. Have Someone Else Read It.

It’s always wise to have someone else read your draft before you submit your essay. You’ll be much more relieved knowing you submitted your very best work.

10. Now, go fine tune your drafts, tell us your story and be confident in your submission.

If you follow these tips, they will take you far on the UF application.

Dates & Deadlines

Don’t be late for your future. All of the deadlines are published well in advance, so stay on target with your application materials.

Application Details

The application has many components that help us learn more about you. Review these details, begin your application process, and tell us how you can contribute to our Gator family.

Application Details

As a member of the Coalition for Access, Affordability, and Success, the University of Florida uses the Coalition Application. Complete all sections of the Coalition Application, including the UF supplemental section, and submit it no later than November 15, along with the $30 nonrefundable application fee plus $5 processing fee or fee waiver.

Application Dates

  • The freshman application opens each year in August.
  • The application deadline is November 15.
  • Applications received after November 15 are accepted on a space-available basis, which is extremely limited.
  • The Student Self-Reported Academic Record (SSAR) is due by December 1.
  • Test scores should be received from the testing agency by December 15.

At UF , students may begin their first term of study during the summer or fall.In addition, students have the opportunity to enroll at UF during the spring and summer terms only throughout their UF career in Innovation Academy. On your application, please select your preferred term of entry — either summer or fall. If you wish to be considered for Innovation Academy, you will be asked to complete a short-answer question. While every effort will be made to accommodate your preferred term of entry, space limitations may result in admission to an alternate term, PaCE, or one of the state college partnership programs.

Application Sections

If you will claim Florida residency for tuition purposes, you will need to submit the Florida Residency Declaration. With very few exceptions, applicants younger than 24 years of age will need a parent or guardian to complete and sign the residency declaration to establish Florida residency. Claimants must provide proof of Florida residency as evidenced by a Florida driver’s license, vehicle registration and/or voter registration. Additional Information

You will be asked to submit one personal essay. The personal essay will allow the admissions staff to get to know who you are as a student. Your essay should be limited to approximately 2500 characters, including spaces.

2017-2018 Essay Topics

  • Tell a story from your life, describing an experience that either demonstrates your character or helped to shape it.
  • Describe a time when you made a meaningful contribution to others in which the greater good was your focus. Discuss the challenges and rewards of making your contribution.
  • Has there been a time when you’ve had a long-cherished or accepted belief challenged? How did you respond? How did the challenge affect your beliefs?
  • What is the hardest part of being a teenager now? What’s the best part? What advice would you give a younger sibling or friend (assuming they would listen to you)?
  • Submit an essay on a topic of your choice.

International Applicants

Student Self-Reported Academic Record (SSAR)

The SSAR is the self-reported transcript of your high school grades from 9th-11th and courses in progress for grade 12. The SSAR is required for all freshman applicants including applicants who have already graduated from high school. Please see the Exemptions tab for exceptions.

If you have met the November 15 deadline, submit and link the SSAR no later than December 1. Students who have applied after November 15 should submit and link the SSAR no later than March 1. If your SSAR is received after December 1, your application will be considered on a space-available basis.

Exemptions

Creating Your SSAR

After you have submitted your SSAR through the SSAR portal, you must link it to your UF application. To link your SSAR to your UF application, click the Check Application Status button. You must submit your application for admission before you will be able to check your status and link your SSAR to the application. From the status page, you will click on the SSAR link to link your SSAR to your application.

SSAR Portal

Click here to complete your SSAR.

International Applicants

International freshman applicants are required to submit secondary and college or university credentials from non-U.S. institutions to a credential evaluation agency for a course-by-course evaluation with grade point average calculation. Companies offering these evaluation services include:

  • Academic Evaluation Services
  • Educational Credential Evaluators
  • Josef Silny & Associates Inc.

If using the Josef Silny & Associates Credential Evaluation Application, please refer to the UF application on their site.

University of Florida College Essay Example

This is a college essay of how to approach a personality-type supplemental question for the University of Florida. Hopefully from reading this essay, you will be able to gain a better idea of what the University of Florida is looking for. This student was accepted to the University of Florida’s Honors Program.

Prompt: What’s your theme song?

“There comes a time when we hear a certain call, when the world must come together as one.” My theme song is “We Are the World” by Michael Jackson because it carries with it so many profound messages. On the most basic level, it shows how we can all unite behind one another when we need each other the most as seen with the song’s initial release in 1985 and more recently following the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Yet beyond this, “We Are the World” makes me consider each decision I make and its influence on others. The song makes me cherish the classic American values of “[making] a brighter day,” helping others and expecting nothing in return. Ultimately, our selflessness and ability to empathize with others make us human.

Photo by Chad Miller from Orlando, Florida, US of A (graduation hugs) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons.

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You can also find thousands of practice questions on Albert.io. Albert.io lets you customize your learning experience to target practice where you need the most help. We’ll give you challenging practice questions to help you achieve mastery of the AP, SAT, ACT, and other major exams.

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I was rejected to UF, can someone tell me why?

Replies to: I was rejected to UF, can someone tell me why?

In a recent phone call, a University of California (UC) admissions officer called these “non-ordinary” topics “The Three D’s: Death, Disease and Divorce”. Given the frequency in which he reads essays with these three topics, he admitted he sometimes predicts how the story will end, rather than paying attention to what’s actually written–which contradicts the urban myth that a traumatic event can lead to a distinguishing essay.

Also from Forbes magazine:

Mistake 4: The essay better be perfect – and seriously substantive. It might be all those things; or not. What it must be is the kid’s own. Admission officers, who typically read more than 50 sets of essays a night — can see through those written with “just a little polishing” by parents or counselors in a heartbeat. The essay should answer the question asked, and provide insight into what makes the applicant tick. Whenever possible, kids should stay away from the “3-D’s”: death. disease, and divorce. While grandma’s death may have been important to the applicant, it too often comes across as an (unsuccessful) attempt at sounding profound. Similarly, the essay that focuses on the applicant’s trip to Belize where he helped build that latrine may seem unique to the student. But to the admission officer who has read thousands of such essays, the only thing the AO is wondering is why there isn’t a latrine stretching from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

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New UF Application Essay Prompt for 2014-2015

The University of Florida Application for Summer/Fall 2015 Admission is available and includes a NEW essay topic:

We often hear the phrase “the good life.” In fact, the University of Florida’s common course required of all undergraduate students is titled “What is the Good Life?”. The concept of “the good life” can be interpreted in many different ways depending upon the experiences, values and aspirations of each individual.

In a concise narrative, describe your notion of “the good life.” How will your undergraduate experience at the University of Florida prepare you to live “the good life”?

Remember to keep within the 500-word maximum length. (The counter on the page counts down from the 3885-CHARACTER limit, which is approx. 450 words with room for spacing between paragraphs.)

I recommend to my college admissions consulting clients that they draft the writing sections (e.g. Resume Questions and Personal Essay) of the UF application in GoogleDocs or Word and then use a text editor (e.g. TextEdit) to remove any formatting prior to copying the text into the UF application.

Basic information about the UF “Good Life” course, copied from the UF website, can be found below.

BEFORE drafting your essay, I suggest that you (1) learn about the UF course (Google search); (2) reflect on your experiences, values and goals; (3) outline your personal interpretation of a “good life” and (4) research/consider how your potential UF experience could help you prepare for a “good life”.

HUM 2305: What is the Good Life? (from the UF website)

Through a close examination of relevant works of art, music, literature, history, religion, and philosophy, students in this class will consider the basic question, “What is the Good Life?” The course will serve as an invitation to the Humanities and to a lifetime of reflection on the human condition through the unique opportunities available to the students at the University of Florida.

The Humanities, a cluster of disciplines that inquire into the very nature and experience of being human, provide many approaches to the question ‘What is a good life,’ as well as a multiform treasury of responses that comprises the cultural and intellectual legacy of world humanity.

The question is especially relevant for a detailed examination as you become more and more involved in making the decisions that will shape your future and the future of others. In order to make reasonable, ethical, well-informed life choices, it is useful to reflect upon how one might aspire to live both as an individual, and a member of local and global communities.

The course is interdisciplinary and draws on the considerable humanities resources at UF. It is also cross-cultural and draws on the full range of human experience across the world and through time in trying to answer the question: “What is the good life?” It contains elements such as the gateway readings, museum exhibits, and performances that are common to the several sections being taught this semester. The lectures, discussion sections, and other readings are specific to your section of this course.

University of Florida Requirements for Admission

Choose Your Test

What are University of Florida’s admission requirements? While there are a lot of pieces that go into a college application, you should focus on only a few critical things:

In this guide we’ll cover what you need to get into University of Florida and build a strong application.

School location: Gainesville, FL

This school is also known as: UF

Admissions Rate: 48%

If you want to get in, the first thing to look at is the acceptance rate. This tells you how competitive the school is and how serious their requirements are.

The acceptance rate at University of Florida is 48%. For every 100 applicants, 48 are admitted.

This means the school is moderately selective. The school expects you to meet their requirements for GPA and SAT/ACT scores, but they’re more flexible than other schools. If you exceed their requirements, you have an excellent chance of getting in. But if you don’t, you might be one of the unlucky minority that gets a rejection letter.

University of Florida GPA Requirements

Many schools specify a minimum GPA requirement, but this is often just the bare minimum to submit an application without immediately getting rejected.

The GPA requirement that really matters is the GPA you need for a real chance of getting in. For this, we look at the school’s average GPA for its current students.

Average GPA: 3.71

The average GPA at University of Florida is 3.71.

(Most schools use a weighted GPA out of 4.0, though some report an unweighted GPA. This school did not officially report its average GPA, but we’ve estimated it here using data from over 1,000 schools.)

With a GPA of 3.71, University of Florida requires you to be above average in your high school class. You’ll need at least a mix of A’s and B’s, with more A’s than B’s. You can compensate for a lower GPA with harder classes, like AP or IB classes. This will show that you’re able to handle more difficult academics than the average high school student.

If you’re currently a junior or senior, your GPA is hard to change in time for college applications. If your GPA is at or below the school average of 3.71, you’ll need a higher SAT or ACT score to compensate. This will help you compete effectively against other applicants who have higher GPAs than you.

SAT and ACT Requirements

Each school has different requirements for standardized testing. Most schools require the SAT or ACT, and many also require SAT subject tests.

You must take either the SAT or ACT to submit an application to University of Florida. More importantly, you need to do well to have a strong application.

University of Florida SAT Requirements

Many schools say they have no SAT score cutoff, but the truth is that there is a hidden SAT requirement. This is based on the school’s average score.

Average SAT: 1330 (Old: 1874)

The average SAT score composite at University of Florida is a 1330 on the 1600 SAT scale.

On the old 2400 SAT, this corresponds to an average SAT score of 1874.

This score makes University of Florida Moderately Competitive for SAT test scores.

University of Florida SAT Score Analysis (New 1600 SAT)

The 25th percentile New SAT score is 1250, and the 75th percentile New SAT score is 1420. In other words, a 1250 on the New SAT places you below average, while a 1420 will move you up to above average.

Learn more about tutoring in the Miami area to improve your test score and strengthen your application to UF.

Here’s the breakdown of new SAT scores by section:

University of Florida SAT Score Analysis (Old 2400 SAT)

The 25th percentile Old SAT score is 1740, and the 75th percentile SAT score is 2020. In other words, a 1740 on the Old SAT places you below average, while a 2020 puts you well above average.

Here’s the breakdown of old SAT scores by section:

SAT Score Choice Policy

The Score Choice policy at your school is an important part of your testing strategy.

University of Florida has the Score Choice policy of “Highest Section.”

This is also known as “superscoring.” This means that you can choose which SAT tests you want to send to the school. Of all the scores they receive, your application readers will consider your highest section scores across all SAT test dates you submit.

Click below to learn more about how superscoring critically affects your test strategy.

For example, say you submit the following 3 test scores:

Even though the highest total you scored on any one test date was 1000, University of Florida will take your highest section score from all your test dates, then combine them to form your Superscore. You can raise your composite score from 1000 to 1400 in this example.

This is important for your testing strategy. Because you can choose which tests to send in, and University of Florida forms your Superscore, you can take the SAT as many times as you want, then submit only the tests that give you the highest Superscore. Your application readers will only see that one score.

Therefore, if your SAT superscore is currently below a 1330, we strongly recommend that you consider prepping for the SAT and retaking it. You have a very good chance of raising your score, which will significantly boost your chances of getting in.

Even better, because of the Superscore, you can focus all your energy on a single section at a time. If your Reading score is lower than your other sections, prep only for the Reading section, then take the SAT. Then focus on Math for the next test, and so on. This will surely give you the highest Superscore possible.

Download our free guide on the top 5 strategies you must be using to improve your score. This guide was written by Harvard graduates and SAT perfect scorers. If you apply the strategies in this guide, you’ll study smarter and make huge score improvements.

University of Florida ACT Requirements

Just like for the SAT, University of Florida likely doesn’t have a hard ACT cutoff, but if you score too low, your application will get tossed in the trash.

Average ACT: 28

The average ACT score at University of Florida is 28. This score makes University of Florida Moderately Competitive for ACT scores.

The 25th percentile ACT score is 27, and the 75th percentile ACT score is 31.

Even though University of Florida likely says they have no minimum ACT requirement, if you apply with a 27 or below, you’ll have a very hard time getting in, unless you have something else very impressive in your application. There are so many applicants scoring 28 and above that a 27 will look academically weak.

ACT Score Sending Policy

If you’re taking the ACT as opposed to the SAT, you have a huge advantage in how you send scores, and this dramatically affects your testing strategy.

Here it is: when you send ACT scores to colleges, you have absolute control over which tests you send. You could take 10 tests, and only send your highest one. This is unlike the SAT, where many schools require you to send all your tests ever taken.

This means that you have more chances than you think to improve your ACT score. To try to aim for the school’s ACT requirement of 28 and above, you should try to take the ACT as many times as you can. When you have the final score that you’re happy with, you can then send only that score to all your schools.

ACT Superscore Policy

By and large, most colleges do not superscore the ACT. (Superscore means that the school takes your best section scores from all the test dates you submit, and then combines them into the best possible composite score). Thus, most schools will just take your highest ACT score from a single sitting.

We weren’t able to find the school’s exact ACT policy, which most likely means that it does not Superscore. Regardless, you can choose your single best ACT score to send in to University of Florida, so you should prep until you reach our recommended target ACT score of 28.

Download our free guide on the top 5 strategies you must be using to improve your score. This guide was written by Harvard graduates and ACT perfect scorers. If you apply the strategies in this guide, you’ll study smarter and make huge score improvements.

SAT/ACT Writing Section Requirements

Both the SAT and ACT have a Writing section that includes an essay.

University of Florida requires you to take the SAT/ACT Writing section. They’ll use this as another factor in their admissions consideration.

SAT Subject Test Requirements

Schools vary in their SAT subject test requirements. Typically, selective schools tend to require them, while most schools in the country do not.

We did not find information that University of Florida requires SAT subject tests, and so most likely it does not. At least 6 months before applying, you should still doublecheck just to make sure, so you have enough time to take the test.

Our Expert’s Notes

We did more detailed research into this school and found the following information.

UF has minimum admission requirements:

A cumulative C average in the academic core at all institutions attended

Students taking dual enrollment courses must present a minimum 2.0 GPA at every institution attended.

A record of good conduct.

At least the minimum score in each section of the SAT: Critical Reading= 460, Mathematics=460 and Writing= 440.

On the ACT with Writing, a minimum score of 19 on the Reading section, 19 on the Mathematics section, and 18 on the English/Writing section.

Final Admissions Verdict

Because this school is moderately selective, strong academic performance will almost guarantee you admission. Scoring a 2020 SAT or a 31 ACT or above will nearly guarantee you admission. Because the school admits 48% of all applicants, being far above average raises the admission rate for you to nearly 100%.

If you can achieve a high SAT/ACT score, the rest of your application essentially doesn’t matter. You still need to meet the rest of the application requirements, and your GPA shouldn’t be too far off from the school average of 3.71. But you won’t need dazzling extracurriculars and breathtaking letters of recommendation to get in. You can get in based on the merits of your score alone.

But if your score is a 1740 SAT or a 27 ACT and below, you have a good chance of being one of the unlucky few to be rejected.

Admissions Calculator

Here’s our custom admissions calculator. Plug in your numbers to see what your chances of getting in are.

How would your chances improve with a better score?

Try to take your current SAT score and add 160 points (or take your ACT score and add 4 points) to the calculator above. See how much your chances improve?

At PrepScholar, we’ve created the leading online SAT/ACT prep program. We guarantee an improvement of 160 SAT points or 4 ACT points on your score, or your money back.

Here’s a summary of why we’re so much more effective than other prep programs:

  • PrepScholar customizes your prep to your strengths and weaknesses. You don’t waste time working on areas you already know, so you get more results in less time.
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Application Requirements

Every school requires an application with the bare essentials – high school transcript and GPA, application form, and other core information. Many schools, as explained above, also require SAT and ACT scores, as well as letters of recommendation, application essays, and interviews. We’ll cover the exact requirements of University of Florida here.

2015-2016 University of Florida Application Thread

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Student hopes offbeat poem will be his ticket to elite UF program

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CLEARWATER — Milan Patel is a high school senior who plays guitar for the terminally ill. He teaches cancer patients how to meditate. His grades and test scores are staggering. He fences and snowboards, skis and reads great works of literature — for fun. If he told you that he glows in the dark, you might believe him.

But when the Palm Harbor University High School student sat down to write a short essay for admission to the University of Florida’s exclusive honors program, Milan drew on none of this gold. Instead he wrote a poem about soiling himself.

It begins: “The first day of kindergarten, I knew so few / I was but a young boy, so fragile and true / Little did I know in my pants I would poo.

The full poem is 13 lines and was in the hands of the University of Florida Honors Program before last weekend’s deadline. It landed on a Washington Post blog, stirring online debate over the merits of wacky college essays — and whether this one would work.

“It kind of just came to me,” says the Clearwater teen, who estimates he spent “maybe 15 minutes” on the task of telling UF about his ruined underwear.

Creative as he may have been, 17-year-old Milan, who is in the International Baccalaureate program, was simply answering UF’s essay prompt: “Describe your most embarrassing moment in the form of a poem.”

Three years ago, the honors program joined the ranks of a few other selective universities that ask prospective students to write on unusual topics.

University of Florida officials say the offbeat prompts help them learn more about students and ensure a diverse group of thinkers in the honors program.

But some question the tactic. On top of overloaded resumes and eye-popping test scores, they ask: Should you have to be funny to get into college, too?

The University of Florida Honors Program is an exclusive community at the state’s flagship school. To get in, first you have to be admitted to the university itself, a hurdle Milan has vaulted. Then, your grades, test scores, extracurriculars and two essays are reviewed by a committee of staff and students. About half the applicants get in.

The longer essay is fairly standard, asking students what kind of charity or business they would like to open and how they’d get it going. Some answer in entertaining ways. Rafael Vaello, a football player at Tampa’s Jesuit High School, dreamed up a men’s nail salon he’d call “Tough as Nails.”

But standard questions usually beget standard answers. So in 2010, program director Kevin Knudson added another essay.

Last year’s applicants could either “tell the story of Chester C. Cluckington, the first chicken to cross the road”; decide whether Napoleon or Attila the Hun was the better tree climber; or answer, simply, “Are we alone?”

In opting for the poem this year, Milan turned down “Which historical figure would you want to go out with on a Friday night?” and “Tell the story of how Peanut Butter met Jelly.”

Gabriel Otheguy, another Jesuit High senior, spun a West Side Pantry-esque tale of forbidden love. “Countless times he felt her sweet stare upon him from across the shelf,” he wrote. “But she was a sweet, and he a salt. What could he do?”

With such unusual prompts, “You’re going to learn something,” Knudson said. “We’re asking them to think.”

And UF is asking for something more.

“I’ll be honest, if something makes me laugh, I tend to score it a little higher,” Knudson says.

What if you’re not funny?

UF senior and Hillsborough High School graduate Blake Tomlin belongs to the last honors class before the unusual essay prompts were introduced, and says he’s thankful for that.

“You spend all of high school working to look good with academics and extracurriculars and then they put you on the spot,” Blake says. “They ask you to be a comedian. Not everyone’s funny and not everyone has to be.”

Michele Hernandez, a Vermont-based consultant who coaches students to help them get into UF honors as well as the Ivy League, says Knudson’s staff is asking for little more than a stunt.

“They’re not going to find anything out about you,” she says.

But the quirky streak that characterizes the essays also shows up on campus.

Earlier this year, a group of UF honors students ate sundaes on a Sunday while watching a movie about dreams within dreams, Inception. Another time they filled panty hose with flour and had a mock snowball fight.

“They’re not your typical bookworms,” says Leslie Gaynor, a sophomore and graduate of Freedom High School in Tampa. “They’re way beyond that.”

Whether rewarding humor is fair game or not, as high school students apply to more and more colleges, analysts say specialized essay prompts will become more popular to help sift through the applicant pool. The University of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania are well-known for such essays.

The UF honors program’s offbeat essay is worth half as much as the longer, more typical essay. In most cases, it won’t be the deciding admissions factor.

Yet it does matter. A personality-packed poem can compensate for a resume lacking volunteer hours or club presidencies, Knudson says. The program wants well-rounded students, and humor can make a student seem round.

Milan also wrote an essay about meditation and fencing, but despite his wealth of extracurriculars, says he was glad for the chance to write the odder essay. “I hope it conveys that I’m more easygoing than a typical honors applicant,” he says.

The University of Florida has promised its honors decisions by April 1. Until then, Milan has the waiting game, some new notoriety, and the sticking memory of a kindergarten teacher asking him, “Does this happen often?”

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