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Writing narrative essays can be tough. Most of us aren’t very good at writing stories to begin with. When writing a narrative essay you will have to tell a very specific type of story based on what your professor requests.

What are the best narrative essay topics?

Few of us have any idea where to start when writing a narrative essay. If you’re in that situation, this article will help you identify the ten best narrative essay topics. Here they are:

  1. How your childhood effected who you are as an adult
  2. What you learned about love during your first relationship
  3. How a baby taught you about what really matters
  4. How your relationship (or marriage) failed, and what you could have done differently
  5. Why you never realized just how important your parents were, and what happened to change that
  6. How a senior was able to teach you a lesson that you would have learned the hard way, and how that taught respect for your elders
  7. What raising a pet taught you
  8. How meeting a total stranger had a profound impact on how the rest of your life would turn out
  9. Why your best friend might not always really be your best friend
  10. How you saved someone’s life and learned the value of kindness to strangers in the process

Of course, you might not be able to write on all of these topics because you haven’t had those experiences. But why should that stop you?

You can make things up!

When you write a narrative essay everything is under your control. You have the right (and responsibility) to make up any details necessary to deliver your message.

Remember, a narrative essay is telling a story.

When you tell a story, you want to make sure you use the right kinds of sensory details. It will be easy for you to skip this step because it’s difficult. But if you include these details in your essay it will help the reader become more engaged.

You also want to make sure you utilize proper pacing. Don’t zip through the details too quickly or your reader won’t really be able to become engaged. If you take too long, your reader may become bored and never even finish reading the essay.

There are also individuals who can make all of this a lot easier for you. They provide their services as a writer to write custom essays for you, and some of them sell prewritten essays. You may want to consider using one of these services for your paper.

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27 Offbeat College Essay Topics

Orange is the New Black is the new black, at least as far as Netflix viewers are concerned. The women-in-prison dramedy may have premiered in 2013, but it’s still got viewers hooked. Just as they did in 2017, HighSpeedInternet.com took a deep dive into Netflix analytics using Google Trends to find out which shows people in each state were searching Netflix for throughout the year. While there was a little bit of crossover between 2016 and 2017, new series like American Vandal and Mindhunter gave viewers a host of new content. But that didn’t stop Orange is the New Black from dominating the map; it was the most searched show in 15 states.

Coming in at a faraway second place was American Vandal, a new true crime satire that captured the attention of five states (Illinois, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Wisconsin). Even more impressive is the fact that the series premiered in mid-September, meaning that it found a large and rabid audience in a very short amount of time.

Folks in Alaska, Colorado, and Oregon were all destined to be disappointed; Star Trek: Discovery was the most searched-for series in each of these states, but it’s not yet available on Netflix in America (you’ve got to get CBS All Access for that, folks). Fourteen states broke the mold a bit with shows that were unique to their state only; this included Big Mouth in Delaware, The Keepers in Maryland, The OA in Pennsylvania, GLOW in Rhode Island, and Black Mirror in Hawaii.

Check out the map above to see if your favorite Netflix binge-watch matches up with your neighbors’. For more detailed findings, visit HighSpeedInternet.com.

Thanks to the internet, people around the world can conduct global research, trade tips, and find faraway friends without ever leaving their couch. Not everyone pays the same price for these digital privileges, though, according to new data visualizations spotted by Thrillist.

To compare internet user prices in each country, cost information site HowMuch.net created a series of maps. The data comes courtesy of English market research consultancy BDRC and Cable.co.uk, which teamed up to analyze 3351 broadband packages in 196 nations between August 18, 2017 and October 12, 2017.

In the U.S., for example, the average cost for internet service is $66 per month. That’s substantially more than what browsers pay in neighboring Mexico ($27) and Canada ($55). Still, we don’t have it bad compared to either Namibia or Burkina Faso, where users shell out a staggering $464 and $924, respectively, for monthly broadband access. In fact, internet in the U.S. is far cheaper than what residents in 113 countries pay, including those in Saudi Arabia ($84), Indonesia ($72), and Greenland ($84).

On average, internet costs in Asia and Russia tend to be among the lowest, while access is prohibitively expensive in sub-Saharan Africa and in certain parts of Oceania. As for the world’s cheapest internet, you’ll find it in Ukraine and Iran.

Check out the maps below for more broadband insights, or view HowMuch.net’s full findings here.

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  • #TBT
  • THE PRESIDENTS
  • WORDS
  • RETROBITUARIES

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11 Offbeat College Essay Topics

Let’s take a look at some of the stranger questions those wacky admissions officers have asked.

1. How do you feel about Wednesday? (University of Chicago, 2002)

This topic was inspired by a student. However, it was optional. Students did not have to share their thoughts on Wednesday if they did not feel comfortable doing so.

2. What outrages you? (Wake Forest, 2009)

For most students? Questions like this one. We think admissions officers are looking for a particular answer, like “genocide.” Wake Forest claims they just want to know the real you, but honestly, they’re just being obnoxious.

3. Write a haiku, limerick, or short poem that best represents you. (NYU, 2009)

College essays are stressful

Don’t make me do this.

4. In the year 2050, a movie is being made of your life. Please tell us the name of your movie and briefly summarize the story line. (NYU, 2009)

College admissions officers like to throw in “fun” questions like this to relieve a bit of the stress high school seniors face while applying to college. I don’t think it’s working.

This question is one of several options for prospective Tufts students this year. I’m wondering how most people will interpret this one—I immediately thought of extraterrestrial life. In any case, I’m betting most students will pick a more generic essay that involves less thinking.

6. What is college for? (Hampshire College, 2009)

Small liberal arts colleges like to pose deceptively simple questions like this one. I’d probably come up with something cheesy about forming close personal bonds and broadening myself intellectually.

7. Please describe a daily routine or tradition of yours that may seem ordinary to others but holds special meaning for you. Why is this practice significant to you? (Barnard, 2009)

Yet another essay that lets you sneakily show how unique you are. Colleges want students to really open up, but I wonder how many essays like these have fabricated answers of what the students think will sound good, not reality.

8. Make a bold prediction about something in the year 2020 that no one else has made a bold prediction about. (University of Virginia, 1999)

UVa is another college that offers several interesting optional essays each year. Colleges claim they truly are optional and you won’t be penalized for not doing them”¦

9. Write a short story using one of the following titles: a.) House of Cards, b.)The Poor Sport, c.) Drama at the Prom, d.) Election Night, 2044, e.) The Getaway. (Tufts, 2009)

This is an unusual essay, as it’s asking for something fictional. But I’d imagine any prospective creative writing majors would be quite happy to pen a short story rather than a revealing nonfiction essay.

10. How did you get caught? (Or not caught, as the case may be.) (Chicago, 2009)

I had to include another UChicago one—they’re just so odd. This one is also inspired by a student (I’m curious to know the source of the inspiration.) This university likes to use offbeat questions because it draws in a different kind of student—a bit eclectic and intellectual—which is just what Chicago is looking for.

11. You have just completed your 300-page autobiography. Please submit Page 217. (UPenn, 2009)

This topic was popularized by UPenn in the ’80s, and many other colleges have adopted it since. I read one (possibly apocryphal) anecdote about a father who called an admissions officer to ask if his son could send his essay in late, as he wouldn’t have time to finish his 300 page autobiography before deadline.

Do you know of any other interesting essay topics? Tell us about them in the comments!

Fred Rogers—who was born in Latrobe, Pennsylvania on March 20, 1928— remains an icon of kindness for the ages. An innovator of children’s television, his salt-of-the-earth demeanor and genuinely gentle nature taught a generation of kids the value of kindness. In celebration of what would have been his 90th birthday, here are 15 things you might not have known about everyone’s favorite “neighbor.”

1. HE WAS BULLIED AS A CHILD.

According to Benjamin Wagner, who directed the 2010 documentary Mister Rogers & Me—and was, in fact, Rogers’s neighbor on Nantucket—Rogers was overweight and shy as a child, and often taunted by his classmates when he walked home from school. “I used to cry to myself when I was alone,” Rogers said. “And I would cry through my fingers and make up songs on the piano.” It was this experience that led Rogers to want to look below the surface of everyone he met to what he called the “essential invisible” within them.

2. HE WAS AN ORDAINED MINISTER.

Rogers was an ordained minister and, as such, a man of tremendous faith who preached tolerance wherever he went. When Amy Melder, a six-year-old Christian viewer, sent Rogers a drawing she made for him with a letter that promised “he was going to heaven,” Rogers wrote back to his young fan:

“You told me that you have accepted Jesus as your Savior. It means a lot to me to know that. And, I appreciated the scripture verse that you sent. I am an ordained Presbyterian minister, and I want you to know that Jesus is important to me, too. I hope that God’s love and peace come through my work on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.”

3. HE RESPONDED TO ALL HIS FAN MAIL.

Responding to fan mail was part of Rogers’s very regimented daily routine, which began at 5 a.m. with a prayer and included time for studying, writing, making phone calls, swimming, weighing himself, and responding to every fan who had taken the time to reach out to him.

“He respected the kids who wrote [those letters],” Heather Arnet, an assistant on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in 2005. “He never thought about throwing out a drawing or letter. They were sacred.”

According to Arnet, the fan mail he received wasn’t just a bunch of young kids gushing to their idol. Kids would tell Rogers about a pet or family member who died, or other issues with which they were grappling. “No child ever received a form letter from Mister Rogers,” Arnet said, noting that he received between 50 and 100 letters per day.

4. ANIMALS LOVED HIM AS MUCH AS PEOPLE DID.

It wasn’t just kids and their parents who loved Mister Rogers. Koko, the Stanford-educated gorilla who understands 2000 English words and can also converse in American Sign Language, was an avid Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood watcher, too. When Rogers visited her, she immediately gave him a hug—and took his shoes off.

5. HE WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED MUSICIAN.

Though Rogers began his education in the Ivy League, at Dartmouth, he transferred to Rollins College following his freshman year in order to pursue a degree in music (he graduated Magna cum laude). In addition to being a talented piano player, he was also a wonderful songwriter and wrote all the songs for Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood—plus hundreds more.

6. HIS INTEREST IN TELEVISION WAS BORN OUT OF A DISDAIN FOR THE MEDIUM.

Rogers’s decision to enter into the television world wasn’t out of a passion for the medium—far from it. “When I first saw children’s television, I thought it was perfectly horrible,” Rogers told Pittsburgh Magazine. “And I thought there was some way of using this fabulous medium to be of nurture to those who would watch and listen.”

7. KIDS WHO WATCHED MISTER ROGERS’ NEIGHBORHOOD RETAINED MORE THAN THOSE WHO WATCHED SESAME STREET.

A Yale study pitted fans of Sesame Street against Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood watchers and found that kids who watched Mister Rogers tended to remember more of the story lines, and had a much higher “tolerance of delay,” meaning they were more patient.

8. ROGERS’S MOM KNIT ALL OF HIS SWEATERS.

If watching an episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood gives you sweater envy, we’ve got bad news: You’d never be able to find his sweaters in a store. All of those comfy-looking cardigans were knitted by Fred’s mom, Nancy. In an interview with the Archive of American Television, Rogers explained how his mother would knit sweaters for all of her loved ones every year as Christmas gifts. “And so until she died, those zippered sweaters I wear on the Neighborhood were all made by my mother,” he explained.

9. HE WAS COLORBLIND.

Those brightly colored sweaters were a trademark of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, but the colorblind host might not have always noticed. In a 2003 article, just a few days after his passing, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette wrote that:

Among the forgotten details about Fred Rogers is that he was so colorblind he could not distinguish between tomato soup and pea soup.

He liked both, but at lunch one day 50 years ago, he asked his television partner Josie Carey to taste it for him and tell him which it was.

Why did he need her to do this, Carey asked him. Rogers liked both, so why not just dip in?

“If it’s tomato soup, I’ll put sugar in it,” he told her.

10. HE WORE SNEAKERS AS A PRODUCTION CONSIDERATION.

According to Wagner, Rogers’s decision to change into sneakers for each episode of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood was about production, not comfort. “His trademark sneakers were born when he found them to be quieter than his dress shoes as he moved about the set,” wrote Wagner.

11. MICHAEL KEATON GOT HIS START ON THE SHOW.

Oscar-nominated actor Michael Keaton’s first job was as a stagehand on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, manning Picture, Picture, and appearing as Purple Panda.

12. ROGERS GAVE GEORGE ROMERO HIS FIRST PAYING GIG, TOO.

It’s hard to imagine a gentle, soft-spoken, children’s education advocate like Rogers sitting down to enjoy a gory, violent zombie movie like Dawn of the Dead, but it actually aligns perfectly with Rogers’s brand of thoughtfulness. He checked out the horror flick to show his support for then-up-and-coming filmmaker George Romero, whose first paying job was with everyone’s favorite neighbor.

“Fred was the first guy who trusted me enough to hire me to actually shoot film,” Romero said. As a young man just out of college, Romero honed his filmmaking skills making a series of short segments for Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, creating a dozen or so titles such as “How Lightbulbs Are Made” and “Mr. Rogers Gets a Tonsillectomy.” The zombie king, who passed away in 2017, considered the latter his first big production, shot in a working hospital: “I still joke that ‘Mr. Rogers Gets a Tonsillectomy’ is the scariest film I’ve ever made. What I really mean is that I was scared sh*tless while I was trying to pull it off.”

13. ROGERS HELPED SAVE PUBLIC TELEVISION.

In 1969, Rogers—who was relatively unknown at the time—went before the Senate to plead for a $20 million grant for public broadcasting, which had been proposed by President Johnson but was in danger of being sliced in half by Richard Nixon. His passionate plea about how television had the potential to turn kids into productive citizens worked; instead of cutting the budget, funding for public TV increased from $9 million to $22 million.

14. HE ALSO SAVED THE VCR.

Years later, Rogers also managed to convince the Supreme Court that using VCRs to record TV shows at home shouldn’t be considered a form of copyright infringement (which was the argument of some in this contentious debate). Rogers argued that recording a program like his allowed working parents to sit down with their children and watch shows as a family. Again, he was convincing.

15. ONE OF HIS SWEATERS WAS DONATED TO THE SMITHSONIAN.

In 1984, Rogers donated one of his iconic sweaters to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

Happiness is such a wonderful feeling, why should we only use one word to describe it? In honor of today’s International Day of Happiness, why not open up that vocabulary and let the good times roll.

From the late 19th century, meaning “cheerful.”

2. IN HIGH SNUFF

An expression for “good mood,” used from the late 17th century until the 1930s.

3. OVER THE MOON

Before humans literally went beyond the moon, this popular phrase from the 1930s means “overjoyed.”

Started out meaning “intoxicated,” but by the 1950s it just meant happy.

As in “tickled pink.”

6. MERRY-PIN

Also started as a reference to tipsiness, this referred to a general good ol’ time in the 19th century.

7. RICOCHET

In the 19th century, this bouncy term also meant “splendid.”

8. ALL CALLAO

This 19th century sailor’s slang either referred to the Peruvian port of Callo or acted as a play on the word alcohol. Or both.

9. GAUDEAMUS

From the Latin for “let us rejoice,” this oldie refers to a merry jamboree.

10. KVELLING

From the Yiddish for “so happy and proud my heart is overflowing.”

11. CHUFFED

This current slang in the UK certainly needs to make a trip across the pond.

12. DELIRA AND EXCIRA

A term the Irish use to mean “delirious and excited.” We need to borrow this one, too.

13. GLADSOME

This classic from the 14th century doesn’t get used enough anymore.

14. TO LICK THE EYE

This confusing 19th century gem was used to describe someone who was extremely pleased.

15. COCK-A-HOOP

From the phrase “to set the cock on the hoop,” meaning open the tap and let the good times flow.

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  • QUIZZES
  • WORLD WAR 1
  • SMART SHOPPING
  • STONES, BONES, & WRECKS
  • #TBT
  • THE PRESIDENTS
  • WORDS
  • RETROBITUARIES

These Are the World’s 10 Most Expensive Cities

Nervous About Asking for a Job Referral? LinkedIn Can Now Do It for You

A Simple Trick for Keeping Lemons Fresher for Longer

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Interesting Personal Essay Ideas

A personal essay gives the reader a glimpse of your personal life experience. A lot of times you may need to compose a personal essay. It could be for a simple class assignment, or the requirement for a college application. In order to gain ideas of writing a personal essay, you can get inspired by the listed topics below. Just think of each of the ideas as a prompt for writing, and imagine any special moment the prompt may bring to your mind.

  • How you and your best friend met
  • The bravest moment of your life
  • What makes your parents special
  • The experience of overcoming a fear
  • The moment your life changed forever
  • Why you can succeed in life
  • A difficult choice you have made
  • A place that is special to you
  • The experience of being let down by a friend
  • A failure you experienced
  • A disappointment you had
  • A surprising turn of events you experienced
  • Your favorite period of time
  • A place you always try to avoid
  • If you had power, what you would do with it
  • What super power you choose to have
  • If you could change someone’s life
  • How money matters for your life
  • Where would you go hide
  • The biggest loss you have experienced
  • If you could have a do-over
  • Words that stung
  • A book that has changed your life
  • When you have the desire of running away
  • When you have the urge of hiding in a hole
  • The proudest moment of your life
  • When you were taught a lesson by a child
  • Words that prompted hope
  • If your dog or cat could talk
  • Your favorite time with family
  • If you could invent something
  • If you could live in a different country
  • What the world would be like in 100 years
  • If you lived 100 years ago
  • The animal you would like to be
  • The greatest movie moment
  • One thing you would change about the world
  • If you could change one thing about yourself
  • The type of teacher you want to be
  • If you could live anywhere
  • A museum you’d like to visit
  • If you could become a building
  • Something a robot could never do
  • An animal that could be in charge of the world
  • The greatest discovery
  • Your most fortunate day
  • Your secret love
  • Your secret talent
  • The ugliest thing you have seen
  • The most beautiful thing you have seen
  • An accident which changed everything
  • Something you have witnessed
  • A right choice
  • A wrong choice
  • How you would spend a million dollars
  • The meaning of color
  • If you could start a charity
  • Your favorite gift
  • A close call
  • A secret place
  • A hard lesson
  • An unexplained event
  • Something you can’t resist
  • A visitor that you can’t forget
  • The longest moment you ever had
  • An awkward social moment
  • A near death experience
  • The hardest news you had to deliver
  • A special morning
  • A kiss that meant a lot
  • Why you will never tell a lie
  • When you needed a hug

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