Us foreign policy essay (order an essay inexpensively)

Posted by

Discover American Studies

To view this content you need the Adobe Flash Player. Go here to download it.

America and the World: US Foreign Policy

Author: John Dumbrell

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, the USA has enjoyed – if ‘enjoyed’ is really the correct term – an immense degree of international power. America is now, at least arguably, the most powerful nation the world has ever seen. The contemporary United States is the world’s only remaining superpower. It is the only country in the world whose reach and influence extends across the whole globe. Some commentators refer to the US as a ‘hyperpower’: a new kind of powerful country, wielding power in complex and novel ways. Others see America as an ‘empire’: not a formal empire, like its Roman and British equivalents, but a more informal empire, operating via cultural as much as by military might.

Contemporary American power is often regarded as having three major aspects: military, economic and cultural. On the military side, the US is unequalled. Its defence budget, at least by some calculations, is equal to that of virtually the entire rest of the world – including the former superpower, Russia, and the world’s most populous country, China. The US is by some way the world’s biggest economy, with America dominating the world’s trading markets. Its cultural, or ‘soft’, power is also immense. American popular culture – music, film, even fast food – has a huge international impact.

All this power means that America leaves a massive footprint on the rest of the world. The United States of America consumes around 22% of the world’s energy, although it contains only about 5% of the world’s population. The US is by quite a margin the world’s leading global polluter. Similarly, American foreign policy has a truly global reach: most obviously in the Middle East, but also throughout South America, Europe, Africa and Asia. Every country in the world (not least the United Kingdom) has to develop policies to deal with this degree of global power.

By many measures the US is the most attractive country in the world: at least in so far as we define ‘attraction’ in terms of immigration. The number of people queuing to enter the US is extraordinary. Between 2000 and 2005, it is estimated that some 3.1 million illegal immigrants entered the United States. For many of the world’s downtrodden people, America still holds out the prospect of economic advancement. America is additionally, of course, the world’s most hated country. Anti-Americanism has grown on a massive scale during the early part of the twenty-first century. The invasion of Iraq in 2003 was probably the most controversial, and internationally unpopular, American foreign policy decision in history.

Despite its vast power, the US is not unchallenged. The 9/11 attacks showed its vulnerability to small groups of international terrorists. In the longer term, the rise of China represents a major potential threat to America’s international power. The future for American foreign policy seems likely to involve adjustment to such various threats, along with efforts to retain or regain the loyalty of its long-standing allies.

As a student of American foreign policy, you will gain vital insights into the operation of world politics. You will be studying the very heart of global power, testing crude understandings and interpretations of American foreign policy. You will also learn how American foreign policy is made: by the President, by multinational American corporations, by the US Congress, even by the American people. There is no more important or exciting task than this.

Learn more at these websites:

The following websites provide excellent introductions to the kinds of issues you will encounter as a student of American foreign relations:

US Foreign Policy Essay

Length: 1023 words (2.9 double-spaced pages)

. middle of paper .

. at he was a threat. By putting a harsh

Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Foreign Policy Essay

In this feature, Brookings senior fellow and terrorism expert Daniel Byman and deputy foreign policy editor Dana Stuster curate a weekly essay on foreign and military affairs of interest to national security legal practitioners and scholars. Although not specifically dealing with legal matters, the feature offers context and perspective to many of the debates that go on at the site regularly. Lawfare has always conceived of national security law broadly, because to practice it well, one needs to draw on a diversity of expertise in technical fields like communications technologies, robotics and economics. With The Foreign Policy Essay, Dan and Dana provide us with a window into the worlds of strategy, military operations, geopolitics, and whatever else grabs their interest on any given week.

Latest in Foreign Policy Essay

Foreign Policy Essay

Reassessing Belgium’s ‘Failed’ Counterterrorism Policy

Belgium’s counterterrorism approach was once scorned. Now it should be emulated.

Foreign Policy Essay

In Pursuit of North Korean Human Rights and Denuclearization

The diplomatic opening with Pyongyang is the right time to pressure Kim Jong Un on human rights.

Foreign Policy Essay

Location, Location, Location: Evaluating Risks to Submarines from Low-Yield Warhead and Submarine Missile Launch Detection

How vulnerable are U.S. submarines in the event of a nuclear war?

Foreign Policy Essay

Frenemies: Putin and Erdogan

How long can Russia and Turkey’s rapprochement last?

Foreign Policy Essay

Qatar’s Domestic Agenda and the Gulf Crisis

Doha looks inward to manage the pressure from its Gulf neighbors.

Foreign Policy Essay

The Origins of the Drone Program

How U.S. counterterrorism policy came to rely on a fleet of armed, remotely-piloted vehicles.

Foreign Policy Essay

The Other Battle in Iraq

Now that the Islamic State has been pushed from Iraq, the Iraqi government must address another domestic threat: corruption.

Foreign Policy Essay

Is President Trump Enabling the Islamic State’s Power of Persuasion?

Despite new policies, American social media companies are still being exploited by terrorists. The Trump administration needs to do more to change that.

Foreign Policy Essay

Boko Haram’s al-Qaeda Affiliation: A Response to ‘Five Myths about Boko Haram’

What role did al-Qaeda play in shaping Boko Haram? Jacob Zenn responds to Alexander Thurston.

Foreign Policy Essay

Political Islam and Islamist Terrorism in Bangladesh: What You Need to Know

The United States should be more concerned about jihadism in Bangladesh.

Write my Essay | I need help with my School Assignment

"Write My Essay" We are the most trusted essay writing service. Get the best essays delivered by experienced UK & US essay writers at affordable prices.

US Foreign Policy

Explain US Foreign Policy in 2 cases. Comparison between the Foreign Policy under Case 1 choose from decision/events of Foreign Economic Policies to China Under Nixon and Case 2 from Obama towards China. USE ONE APPROACH/HYPOTHESIS seems valid across two different cases. Sustain an argument (thesis statement) using two cases of U.S. foreign policy decisions or behavior. You must develop a causal explanation based on what you are learning in the unit, and your own thoughts and insights. Some suggested approaches are:

Presidents are meaningfully constrained by public opinion in foreign policy decisions due to…..

In reality, Congress has been unable to check or balance Presidential foreign policy decisions since

Special interests such as economic actors or ethnic influence groups can dominate U.S. foreign

policy on issues important when….

Some possible pairs of cases are: U.S. relations with Indonesia under Suharto and under Yudhoyono; U.S. use of force in the Bosnian and Kosovo conflicts; U.S. relations with Canada and Australia; U.S. free trade diplomacy with Australia and Singapore; U.S. policy towards Africa under G.W. Bush and Obama…This basic analytical approach is a common and useful tool in many professional and academic research contexts, such as business, law, NGO work, government, and across the social sciences. It can be a valuable tool in your academic and professional career.

It is advisable to choose cases (that is, specific decisions or events in U.S. foreign relations) which and have clear relevance to the concept you choose. It is not necessary to include all aspects or details of a given case in your paper. Rather, you should focus on providing a “structured, focused comparison”1 of the two cases to examine one clear-cut proposition/argument. This means asking the same question (argument), using basically the same analytical approach (same kinds of evidence), across both cases.

The essay should utilise following general format (or something similar):

i) introduction and thesis statement

ii) introduction of the cases chosen and rationale for their selection/utility

iii) detailed examination of the cases based around the thesis statement;

iv) discussion and synthesis of the results of the analysis for both cases;

For a custom paper on the above topic, place your order now!

Is this question part of your Assignment?

We can help

Our aim is to help you get A + grades on your Coursework.

We handle assignments in a multiplicity of subject areas including Admission Essays, General Essays, Case Studies, Coursework, Dissertations, Editing, Research Papers, and Research proposals

Custom Written Work

Guaranteed on Time

Achieve the Grade You ordered

Post navigation

Your shopping Cart

We can Help

Our aim is to help you get A + grades on your Coursework.

We handle papers in a multiplicity of subject areas including Admission Essays, General Essays, Case Studies, Coursework, Dissertations, Editing, Research Papers, and Research proposals

Recent Reviews

Our Guarantees

Paper Formating

Current Activity

Why Choose Us

Follow us on G+

Follow us on Twitter

Top essays

Recent Essays

Recent Reviews

Secondary Menu

Wait Before you Leave!

Have you completed your assignment?

Here is a 20% discount for our Academic Research Writing service.

Enter your name and email below and I’ll send it to you.

The Foreign Policy Essay: Evangelicals, Israel, and U.S. Foreign Policy

Editor’s Note: Although the “Israel lobby” and the support of the American Jewish community for Israel have long received considerable attention, the U.S. evangelical community and its strong backing for Israel has not received comparable attention. This neglect is surprising, as the U.S. evangelical community dwarfs the American Jewish community in size and political power and its motivations for supporting Israel are distinct. Paul Miller, a political scientist at RAND and a former National Security Staff member in the Bush and Obama administrations, offers an insightful description of the theological justifications of the U.S. evangelical community’s role in supporting Israel and presents provocative recommendations calling for the United States to reconsider the priority it gives to the relationship with Israel.

There really is an “Israel lobby” that influences U.S. foreign policy, but it is made up of more Christians than Jews. The Pew Forum found in 2013 that 82 percent of white evangelicals believed that Israel was given to the Jewish people by God—more than double the percentage of American Jews who believed the same—and almost half of them believed the United States was not supportive enough of Israel. White evangelicals made up 23 percent of the electorate in 2012, according to the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, large enough for their beliefs to influence candidates’ foreign policy platforms. Much of the support for Israel among evangelicals and fundamentalists stems from a distinctive reading of the Old Testament. They believe that God’s promises to Abraham regarding Israel were both literal and unbreakable and that these promises still hold today. Therefore, nations friendly to Israel stand to be blessed by God, while those opposed court his wrath.

The religiously grounded pro-Israel viewpoint distorts American policy towards Israel with an unhelpful inflexibility and exaggerates the political importance of the country (indeed, the whole region) to the United States. The time, attention, and resources the United States brings to bear on the region have become disproportionate to U.S. political interests there. American policymakers should recognize that there is more theological disagreement on this issue than is widely recognized. The fundamentalist viewpoint does not have strong support in older Christian theology, and emerging evangelical leaders, such as Rick Warren and Russell Moore, tend not to agree with it.

Policymakers should thus feel freer to develop alternative approaches to U.S. policy in the Middle East based on more traditional grounds, such as American security interests and humanitarian ideals. Although the United States should always support Israel’s right to exist, it need not support every Israeli initiative and policy, sustain the high amount of foreign aid the United States gives to Israel every year, nor even spend much time worrying about what is, in reality, a minor dispute in a strategically secondary region of the world compared to Europe and East Asia.

For most of Christian history, Christians believed that God’s promises to Abraham about Israel in the Old Testament should be understood figuratively. God’s promise of a special land for Abraham’s descendants was understood as the promise of heaven—the ultimate Promised Land—for all of the faithful. Christians generally did not look for the reestablishment of the state of Israel and did not look for signs of the end of the world in geopolitical developments in the Middle East.

A new school of theology called dispensationalism arose in the early 19th century that would eventually introduce these ideas into British and American evangelicalism and fundamentalism. It remains a minority view among professing Christians worldwide, as neither the Roman Catholic nor Eastern Orthodox churches agree with it. Dispensationalists argued that the Bible nowhere clearly said that God’s promises to Abraham in the Old Testament had been voided or transferred to the Church (the traditional Christian view). If those promises were still valid, they applied to Abraham and his descendants, meaning (again, reading literally) Jews, not Christians. That includes all the promises God made to Abraham. God promises, at various points, to bless Abraham, give him offspring, make him the father of many nations, bless all peoples through him—and, quite explicitly, to give him a specific piece of real estate. God’s favor on Israel has straightforward implications for the other nations of the world: if you want to be on God’s side, be nice to Israel. God told Abraham, “I will bless those who bless you, and him who dishonors you I will curse,” (Genesis 12:3, English Standard Version).

In the 19th century, dispensationalists regularly predicted that God would fulfill his promise to Abraham by reestablishing a literal state of Israel in the Holy Land, a remarkable claim to make several decades before the First Zionist Congress in 1897. The establishment of the modern State of Israel in 1948 gave dispensationalism a major boost to its credibility and brought it into the mainstream.

Dispensationalism is an aberration in the history of Christian thought. Neither Augustine nor Aquinas (nor Luther nor Calvin) read Scripture the way dispensationalists do. Augustine, for example, argued that the Church was the inheritor of God’s promises to Israel, and those promises should be understood figuratively rather than politically. At any rate, dispensationalism may have passed its prime. Dispensationalists could never agree amongst themselves about how exactly to interpret world events, who the Antichrist was, or when the rapture was to happen. Too many of their conflicting predictions have been falsified by the passage of time.

Due in part to the influence of evangelical and fundamentalist Christians, Israel is the largest recipient of U.S. foreign aid—ever. Since 1951, the United States has given Israel $193 billion in economic and military aid—the vast bulk of it since the Camp David Accords in 1978—according to USAID’s Green Book. Israel has received more money in aid than Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan combined; more than Vietnam during the decade-long U.S. reconstruction and counterinsurgency effort there; and even, astonishingly, more than all of Europe under the Marshall Plan (the Marshall Plan disbursed $13.3 billion between 1948 and 1952, according to The Marshall Foundation. That is equivalent to about $130 billion today when adjusted for inflation).

The United States can and should maintain support for Israel’s existence, its efforts to defend against terrorism and Iranian nuclear blackmail, and its good-faith diplomatic efforts to reach a peace settlement with the Palestinian Authority, but the unhesitating diplomatic, military, and economic support for Israel is not in the United States’ interests. In particular, the United States does not need to sustain the high levels of foreign aid it gives to Israel, tolerate the Mossad’s long record of espionage against American targets, play a direct role brokering agreements between the Israelis and their neighbors, or even care very deeply about the Israel-Palestine dispute.

Viva Essay

Online writing help and assistance

Learn how to:

  • Make up interesting topics
  • Build complicated outlines
  • Write intriguing introductions
  • Conduct in-depth research
  • Write effective conclusions
  • Proofread and edit your papers
  • Home

This blog was created to help students boost their grades.

External resources:

  • Good Writing guides.
  • Essay writing articles wiki.
  • Custom dissertations.

American Foreign Policy

Every country has a policy that it references in order to define the ways in which it interacts with other foreign countries. When it comes the American foreign policy it dictates the ways that the country engages in business and travel with other foreign countries down to very specific terms. There are a number of influencing factors that come in to play for the American foreign policy and the ways that it is impacted. Times of war and peace will impact the foreign policy, trading will impact the policy, the economy will impact the policy, and the agreements that can be made between alliance countries will impact the terms of the foreign policy. These are just a few of the most important elements of the American foreign policy that heavily impact the citizens of American and how they can interact with other countries.

Some of the most notable times of war that have impacted the American foreign policy include World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and not the War on Terrorism. These wars impacted the ability for Americans to travel to various countries and the way that America could engage in trade with those particular countries. When America is at war with a country this impacts the country’s ability to trade safely with that area. Therefore, the economy is impacted by the availability of trade. When trading and travel is impacted so are businesses and individuals. If a person’s family lives in a foreign country, and America is at war with that country, then America is not going to send travel arrangements to that area. There are many ways that countries and people are impacted by the American foreign policy.

When it comes to the American foreign trade policy, it affects many people, organizations, and countries. Depending on the status of America’s relationship with another country the foreign policy will impact the foreign policy, trading will impact the policy, the economy will impact the policy, and the agreements that can be made between alliance countries will impact the terms of the foreign policy. These various elements are just a part of the huge impact that changes in the foreign policy can impact. Furthermore, the foreign aid that is available to other countries as well as America’s own military is impacted by the relationships that are help with other countries. If the relationship is damaged or if America is at war with foreign countries, then the availability of aid is diminished to specific areas.

US Foreign Policy Essay

US Foreign Policy Essay

US Foreign policy is what the United States of America does in foreign countries. This may include setting new rules or even controlling the countries’ governments. What the US does in other countries usually ends up creating a conflict or an uprising in the region. US foreign policy makes the world very unstable and it causes disagreements between countries. The Israel Lobby has a great deal of negative influence on US foreign policy. The US is also very keen to destroy Wahabbist…

Essay on Israel and US Foreign Policy

of the US, served its own interests which were not always consistent with US interest in regional stability. The Israeli violations, however, were either condoned or even approved by the US administrations. These reactions comprised what this chapter addressed as a pro-Israel model of intervention. The pro-Israel intervention represented the US foreign policy reaction when the violation to regional stability was committed by Israel. The cases discussed above were evaluated against the US reaction…

Changes In Us Foreign Policy Between 1880 And 1910 Essay

Throughout the years, the United States government had made drastic changes in its foreign policies. The few decades from 1880 to 1910, which saw five different presidents all with very distinct foreign policies, were no exception. As a country, the United States progressed from being a country only concerned with expanding its territory out west, to being a country on the verge of becoming involved in the First World War. During the 1880’s and 1890’s, the United States focused on broadening their…

The Importance of External Factors in Influencing the Conducting of Us Foreign Policy

The Importance of External Factors In Influencing The Conducting Of US Foreign Policy To answer the essay question, external factors are indeed important in influencing the conducting of American foreign policy, as they are for all countries. They are important because they determine the direction American foreign policy takes, and with it, can drastically alter the futures of entire countries (Iraq & Afghanistan post 9/11). This essay will devote itself to exploring and explaining how each external…

Essay about President Bush And Us Foreign Policy

2000 raised a debate between democrat and republican and in the end the American people chose a new leader Mr. George w. Bush. President Bush clearly defined foreign policy objectives and goals. I have seen and hear our dear President Bush foreign policy after September 11. Following this, Bush has established its top priorities in foreign policy. He claims that an acts in the government to improve the international community through negotiation and cooperation. Likewise President Bush remark “It is…

Changes in Us Foreign Policy Between 1880 and 1910 Essay

Throughout the years, the United States government had made drastic changes in its foreign policies. The few decades from 1880 to 1910, which saw five different presidents all with very distinct foreign policies, were no exception. As a country, the United States progressed from being a country only concerned with expanding its territory out west, to being a country on the verge of becoming involved in the First World War. During the 1880’s and 1890’s, the United States focused on broadening their…

Justified – Madison's Decision To Change US Foreign Policy Essay

deal with Washington’s foreign policy. Unlike the other presidents, Madison felt like the foreign policy wasn’t right; so he changed it from isolationism to intervention. The previous foreign policy – known as isolationism – meant that America had to try to stay out of disputes between opposing countries. After Madison changed America’s policy, it became known as intervention: America’s duty was to stand up for itself. Madison did a lot of things before changing the foreign policy; he engaged in peace…

Post-Cold War US Foreign Policy

Post-Cold War US Foreign Relations The Cold War and its ending with the dismantling of the Soviet Union and a great reduction in the threat of communism as a competing system to capitalism and democratic governance changed the focus of US foreign policy. The change did not happen overnight and has ebbed and flowed significantly across time, often associated with the nature of foreign conflicts and US involvement in them but change it did (Saull, 2007, p. 180). The reduction of the size, might and…

Us Foreign Policy 1865-1914, Expansionist or Isolationist Essay

Was the foreign policy of the United States primarily isolationist or expansionist through 1865-1914? At the turn of the century, and after gaining our independence, the United States land mass more than doubled through the use of purchasing, annexing, and war. However, the foreign policy of our government took a predominately isolationist stand. This was a national policy of abstaining from political or economic relations with other countries. General Washington shaped these values by upholding…

Essay on US foreign Policy 1865-1914, expansionist or isolationist

Was the foreign policy of the United States primarily isolationist or expansionist through 1865-1914? At the turn of the century, and after gaining our independence, the United States land mass more than doubled through the use of purchasing, annexing, and war. However, the foreign policy of our government took a predominately isolationist stand. This was a national policy of abstaining from political or economic relations with other countries. General Washington shaped these values by…

Essay on US foreign Policy 1865-1914, expansionist or isolationist

Through the strong foundation of Isolationism and the policies enacted such as The Monroe Doctrine, the United States played a largely neutral role in foreign affairs. The Monroe Doctrine passed in 1823 was to forbid European nations from colonizing any territory in the Western Hemisphere. Although the United States didn’t have the authority or firepower to back this up, it resulted in almost four decades of compulsory US involvement in any foreign affair. After the Civil War, Isolationistic practices grew stronger as the government had to find a way to re-unite the torn nation. President Grover Cleveland promised to avoid committing the nation to form any alliances with other countries while also opposed to the acquisition of new land. The climate of post Civil War US prevented us from deep involvement in foreign affairs. Our navy was also weakened by the war. Our natural resources were scarce and our diplomatic relations with other countries had been neglected. With the attention of our government focused solely on our nation, we proceeded to develop our interior. One of the biggest reasons for growth in US land mass was the public idea of Manifest

US Foreign Policy Essay

US Foreign policy is what the United States of America does in foreign countries. This may include setting new rules or even controlling the countries’ governments. What the US does in other countries usually ends up creating a conflict or an uprising in the region. US foreign policy makes the world very unstable and it causes disagreements between countries. The Israel Lobby has a great deal of negative influence on US foreign policy. The US is also very keen to destroy Wahabbist…

Essay on Israel and US Foreign Policy

of the US, served its own interests which were not always consistent with US interest in regional stability. The Israeli violations, however, were either condoned or even approved by the US administrations. These reactions comprised what this chapter addressed as a pro-Israel model of intervention. The pro-Israel intervention represented the US foreign policy reaction when the violation to regional stability was committed by Israel. The cases discussed above were evaluated against the US reaction…

The Importance of External Factors in Influencing the Conducting of Us Foreign Policy

The Importance of External Factors In Influencing The Conducting Of US Foreign Policy To answer the essay question, external factors are indeed important in influencing the conducting of American foreign policy, as they are for all countries. They are important because they determine the direction American foreign policy takes, and with it, can drastically alter the futures of entire countries (Iraq & Afghanistan post 9/11). This essay will devote itself to exploring and explaining how each external…

Essay about President Bush And Us Foreign Policy

2000 raised a debate between democrat and republican and in the end the American people chose a new leader Mr. George w. Bush. President Bush clearly defined foreign policy objectives and goals. I have seen and hear our dear President Bush foreign policy after September 11. Following this, Bush has established its top priorities in foreign policy. He claims that an acts in the government to improve the international community through negotiation and cooperation. Likewise President Bush remark “It is…

Changes in Us Foreign Policy Between 1880 and 1910 Essay

Throughout the years, the United States government had made drastic changes in its foreign policies. The few decades from 1880 to 1910, which saw five different presidents all with very distinct foreign policies, were no exception. As a country, the United States progressed from being a country only concerned with expanding its territory out west, to being a country on the verge of becoming involved in the First World War. During the 1880’s and 1890’s, the United States focused on broadening their…

Justified – Madison's Decision To Change US Foreign Policy Essay

deal with Washington’s foreign policy. Unlike the other presidents, Madison felt like the foreign policy wasn’t right; so he changed it from isolationism to intervention. The previous foreign policy – known as isolationism – meant that America had to try to stay out of disputes between opposing countries. After Madison changed America’s policy, it became known as intervention: America’s duty was to stand up for itself. Madison did a lot of things before changing the foreign policy; he engaged in peace…

Post-Cold War US Foreign Policy

Post-Cold War US Foreign Relations The Cold War and its ending with the dismantling of the Soviet Union and a great reduction in the threat of communism as a competing system to capitalism and democratic governance changed the focus of US foreign policy. The change did not happen overnight and has ebbed and flowed significantly across time, often associated with the nature of foreign conflicts and US involvement in them but change it did (Saull, 2007, p. 180). The reduction of the size, might and…

Essay about U.S. foreign policy from 1890-1914

standard. Foreign nations became dependent on the United States’ prosperity because economic problems, such as crop failures, were affecting their stability. This along with many other factors developed America’s strong sense of nationalism. The concept of social Darwinism was applied not only to domestic concerns, but to foreign concerns as well. Americans felt that their previous abilities to empower themselves over the Native Americans set as a precedent for their capability to influence foreign nations…

Us Foreign Policy 1865-1914, Expansionist or Isolationist Essay

Was the foreign policy of the United States primarily isolationist or expansionist through 1865-1914? At the turn of the century, and after gaining our independence, the United States land mass more than doubled through the use of purchasing, annexing, and war. However, the foreign policy of our government took a predominately isolationist stand. This was a national policy of abstaining from political or economic relations with other countries. General Washington shaped these values by upholding…

Essay on US foreign Policy 1865-1914, expansionist or isolationist

Was the foreign policy of the United States primarily isolationist or expansionist through 1865-1914? At the turn of the century, and after gaining our independence, the United States land mass more than doubled through the use of purchasing, annexing, and war. However, the foreign policy of our government took a predominately isolationist stand. This was a national policy of abstaining from political or economic relations with other countries. General Washington shaped these values by…

Leave a Reply