Visual argument essay (order an essay inexpensively)

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Essay on Visual Arguments

Visual images are incredibly powerful as tools of advertising, propaganda, and art. The “visual argument” is a sort of argument that utilizes an image, enhanced with some few words, in order to present a particular viewpoint or point of persuasion. That’s why companies regularly brand themselves with new logos and images. The following sample marketing essay analyzes the images shown above and the ways in which it presents an argument to the individual consumer.

Power of visual arguments

It is amazing how much power a simple image can have over the mindset of many. Whole nations have been changed, just through the use of images, and it is this type of image that is known as a Visual Argument. Some of the more famous images have been used to create massive social change are: the Viet Nam-era rifle or tank with a flower in its muzzle, signifying obsolescence of weaponry; the gay pride rainbow, signifying unity from difference; or even the common use of the image of an octopus in political and social commentary cartoons to signify the evil and long-range reach and influence of various groups and to inspire anger and hatred toward them (from the anti-Jewish propaganda in WWII Nazi Germany to the greed of today’s global monopolistic corporatocracies).

These images may seem simple at first, but there are details that go into their creation that give them the power that they hold (almost like marketing propaganda). In fact, scholars have suggested that arguments within images tap into a pattern of thinking that can only be expressed visually, and this form includes its own vocabulary and syntax (Usher 117). From type to layout to color to image—these things seem like irrelevant details, but they make all the world of difference in Visual Arguments. This paper discusses a particular example of Visual Argument in depth in order to prove that this level of detail is necessary in creating Visual Arguments, and in order to show that through including such details the power and effect of the work is greatly increased.

Specific analysis of visuals

75% of the visual argument displayed is displayed in images, the remaining 25% of the visual argument is displayed in words. Two types of Serif font are used. The Serif font of the familiar Cheerios brand is displayed below a spoonful of pills to associate that brand to the visual message. Then below that, a different Serif font, commonly recognized the world over as the Mars, Inc. M&M’s logo font, is used to display the name of the ad campaign, and this brings with it a whole other series of associations. Technically, since both Serif fonts used are globally recognized and associated with those two specific brands, these fonts could also be considered to be within the category of Specialty fonts. The type is functional and appealing (with only two font styles used), and none of it has been altered with any bolding, italics, or underlining. The strong brand associations of the chosen fonts create a relationship between the image and the text. In fact, it might even be appropriate to consider the chosen fonts as images themselves since their use automatically brings to mind so many associated images.

The layout of this piece is very efficient in limiting text and images to avoid clutter and confusion. It focuses on creating coherence and meaning and it is structured in such a way as to indicate the importance of relationships between its component parts—they seem to go hand in hand. The use of layout is extremely important in emphasizing the key ideas of visual arguments (Ramage 169). The choice to put the Cheerios logo above the image of a spoonful of pills is a conscious layout choice. Based on this placement I can only assume that the creator of this piece wanted warm associations that tend to come with the Cheerios brand to hit the viewer first, and only then, once these associations were in place, did he want the viewer to consider the spoonful of pills. This sequence of thought creates a souring of a positive emotion that results in a nervous or unsafe feeling that makes the viewer question any assumptions they may have about health and medications.

Role of colors

In his paper “The Possibility and Actuality of Visual Arguments,” J. Anthony Blair points out that:

“colors invoke feelings of warmth (reds, oranges) or coolness (blues, greens); photographs of young animals (puppies, kittens, children) evoke tender-heartedness (23).”

The color chosen for the piece under discussion is a stark white-on-white. It is difficult to think of stark white as a functional color, but it does actually create a relationship as opposed to being merely decorative. Whiteness can indicate an emptiness, a nothingness, a numbness, a cleanness, a freshness, and a blankness. When the Cheerios logo is added, associates of children and family enter into it. The whiteness of the background, juxtaposed against the whiteness of the medication creates an implied relationship—the background being the nothingness or numbness of everything that comes from being involved in the sterile medication in the forefront of the image. The colors used are realistic, but because the Cheerios brand is used—and the colors of that brand are very well known—a definitive lack of color is very strongly felt and this creates an interesting effect which can be viewed as surreal or cartoonish because of the hyperbole that comes with this stark lack of color.

Additional reading: Click here to read about advertising and gender stereotypes.

In their paper “Toward a Theory of Visual Argument,” David S. Birdsell and Leo Groarke explain that just as the written argument has a context in which it is presented, so does the visual argument (5). In fact, visual arguments may tend to have stronger contexts than their written-word counterparts due to the associations that can be set up instantly and nearly subconsciously, just through use of well-known imagery or symbolism. In the piece under discussion (Cheerios), a strong visual aesthetic is definitely present. The stark white is soothing and disturbing at the same time, which adds a third layer of aesthetics that comes of as being quite sinister.

Logo under examination

The camera is definitely inside the scene of this close-up image of a spoonful of meds under the Cheerios logo—and this works very well in this argument. It illustrates a strong point: society is way too medicated. This is conveyed very effectively through the idea that we eat medication as if it were a bowl of breakfast cereal. This idea is underscored by adding the M&Ms logo since “eating it like candy” is a phrase that has long been associated with taking too many drugs. Cheerios is associated with children, family, and health; and M&Ms are associated with children and fun. The clear juxtaposition between these images against the text highlights the problem of over-medicating and creates a strong emotional response. While the images are clear and not cartoonish, the concept is not very realistic—it’s actually hyperbolic or “surrealistic.” It takes the setting of a run-of-the-mill advertisement and alters it slightly to create a very strong point. What it lacks in story, it makes up for in message.

Final thoughts on visual arguments

As can be seen from the close reading done on the example image for this analysis, there is no question regarding the effectiveness of this Visual Argument as a form of media based marketing. And it can be extrapolated that when any visual argument is created correctly, with thoughtful inclusion of the preceding design aspects, the created argument will be just as effective as this one is. That’s not to say that there won’t be visual arguments that fail, for there will be. But whether or not a visual argument succeeds or fails has a lot to do with the same reason why a verbal or written argument may succeed or fail. The audience, time-period, and environment of the argument creates an intellectual context from which to work. It is within this context that the creator of the argument must craft a new context that juxtaposes against the norms he is arguing with. The creator will use his varied tools to achieve this. For the orator and essay-writer, it is rhetoric; for the visual argumentalist, many very effective tools are available—including color, type, image, and layout.

Works Cited

Birdsell, David. S., and Leo Groarke. “Toward a Theory of Visual Argument.”

Argumentation and Advocacy: The Journal of the American Forensic Association. Summer 1996: 1-10. Washington State University. Web. 2 Dec. 2012.

Blair, J. Anthony. “The Possibility and Actuality of Visual Arguments.” Argumentation and Advocacy: The Journal of the American Forensic Association. Summer 1996: 23-39. UCSB Writing Program. Web. 2 Dec. 2012.

Franklin, Josh. Cheerios. 10 Feb. 2010. Franklin Design + Photography, Vermont.

Ramage, John D., John C. Bean, and June Johnson. Writing Arguments: A Rhetoric with Readings. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2001. Web.

Usher, Nikki. “Interactive Visual Argument: Online News Graphics and the Iraq War.” Journal of Visual Literacy. 2009: 116-126. Ohio University. Web. 2 Dec. 2012.

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How to Write a Visual Analysis Paper

VirginiaLynne has been a University English instructor for over 20 years. She specializes in helping people write essays faster and easier.

Visual Analysis Essays

– Are usually written for Art History, History or English courses.

– Describe the image and discuss how the way it is put together (the composition).

– Analyze the meaning of the image for the artist.

– Consider the historical meaning of the image.

– Evaluate the effectiveness of the image for today.

Analyzing Meaning

All images project ideas or claims. Advertisements generally make these claims openly and even tell you the claim in the text. Works of art may be more subtle but they usually are also trying to get the viewer to believe something. How can you analyze visual images? You look at:

  1. The purpose of the artist.
  2. The audience.
  3. The way the image was composed.
  4. The historical context when it was produced and when it is viewed.

Introduction: Tell the basic facts about the art (see citing your image). Get the reader interested in the image by using one of the following methods:

  • Describe the image vividly so the reader can see it.
  • Tell about how the image was created.
  • Explain the purpose of the artist.
  • Give interesting facts about the art or artist.
  • Talk about a controversy or misunderstanding about the art.

Thesis: Your thesis will tell the meaning of this image (see Analyzing the Meaning of the Image)

Body: Support your thesis with three or more main ideas which support your meaning. Use questions in the pre-writing sections for ideas.

Conclusion: Try to conclude rather than just repeating your thesis. Either give a final interesting fact or try one of the following:

  • Compare the reception of the painting by the audience who first saw it with your own ideas, or with the way people today might interpret the picture.
  • Speculate on what the artist would think about the way his picture has been viewed over time.
  • Compare this image to other similar images.
  • Suggest how this piece of art fits into the works of an artist, or the ad campaign of a company.

What sort of image will you be analyzing for your Visual Analysis Paper?

Student Paper Visual Analysis Sample: This is not a student from my class but I think the example is pretty well done and might be helpful. It is about Jeff Soto’s wood panel painting “Last Voyage”

Visual Analysis of Botticelli: Another student paper which does a nice job with using the format of explaining how the historical period and life of the artist is related to the meaning of the painting as well as discussing the visual aspects.

How to Describe Images

Don’t have an art background? Don’t worry. You probably know a lot more than you realize. Modern people are surrounded by images every day.

Everyone Can Analyze Images: Even if you don’t know the terms of how people analyze art, you will be familiar with many of the tricks that artists use to create a reaction in the reader, such as making the most important images larger and light, and the less important ones in the background or fading darker. You can also easily recognize symbolic colors, such as: red means emergency or blood or danger; green means safe and close to nature; and blue means cool and relaxed.

Start by Looking Closely: Most Visual Analysis Papers will require a clear and vivid description of the image along with an analysis of the visual composition of the picture in order to explain how the artist put the image together to create meaning. Just describe the image you see and use the chart below to help you use the right terms.

Trust Your Own Eyes: You may want to do your own study of the image before you actually research the history of the image, so that you can write out your own thoughts without being influenced by other people.

Use Chart and Questions for Help: Start your visual analysis description by getting a good copy of the image and looking at it carefully. Look at the chart below and answer the key questions in order to help you see the different visual elements.

Elements of Design

Visual Elements of Design

Principles of Design

Analyzing Meaning

Analyzing Meaning of Visual Images

Although Visual Analysis Essays often focus a lot on the details of describing the image, you will also need a thesis which tells what the images mean. There are several ways to do this and your assignment may tell you which direction to go. Here are some typical ways to analyze images for meaning:

  • Analyzing the meaning of the image for the artist and his or her time.
  • Analyzing the meaning of the image for you and your time.
  • Analyzing the changes in the meaning of an image over the course of time.
  • Analyze the audience reaction to the image.
  • Analyze your own reaction and evaluate the effectiveness of the image.

Pre-writing Questions

Use the pre-writing questions below to help you analyze your images and start writing notes that will help you develop your paper ideas.

1. Claims: What claims does the image make? What type of claim is it?

  • Fact Claim: Is it real?
  • Definition Claim: What does it mean?
  • Cause Claim: What is the Cause? What are the effects? How are these related?
  • Value Claim: How important is this? How should we evaluate it?
  • Policy Claim: What is the solution? What should we do about it?

2. Visual Composition: How is the image arranged or composed? Which of the following aspects of composition help makes the claim? Examine:

  • Layout: where images are placed and what catches your attention. How visual lines draw your attention to or away from the focal point.
  • Balance: size of images and how they compare with one another. Is the focal point centered or offset?
  • Color: how color (or lack of color) draws your attention or creates a mood
  • Key figures: what is the main focus? How does this contribute to meaning?
  • Symbols: are there cultural symbols in the image? What do these mean?
  • Stereotypes : how does image support stereotypes or challenge them?
  • Exclusions: is there anything left out of the image that you expect to be there?

3. Genre: What is the genre of this image? (examples: fine art, movie, advertisement, poster, pamphlet, news photograph, graphic art etc.). How does it follow the rules of that genre or break away from them? How does that affect the meaning of the image for the audience?

4. Text: How does any text or caption work to provide meaning to the visual?

5. Appeals: How does it appeal to the audience to believe the claims? Are appeals to logic? Emotion? Character? Authority? Are any of these appeals false or deceiving?

6. Selling: Does the claim move into a sales pitch? Does it use a cultural value or common cultural symbol in a way that exploits that image?

7. Story: What story does this image convey? How does this story help the claim or appeal to the audience?

Examine Context and History

To get ready to analyze the meaning of the image for the artist and the people viewing the art, it helps to first find out the rhetorical situation. That means you need to know what the artist was trying to do at that particular point in time, and how the audience reacted. Sometimes the reaction of the audience that first saw the piece is very different from the reaction you might have. If it is, that can make an interesting paper thesis.

Analyzing Historical Photos

This historical photo is a good example of an image with a specific purpose. The photo was taken by Fridtjof Nansen along with other photos of the Russian famine. The purpose of the photo was to raise money for Russian relief. The photo was published as part of a set of postcards which were sold to raise money and then sent to raise awareness of the problem in others.

Since the text is in French, the Photograph was probably published to raise money from France and other French-speaking peoples. The text elucidates the image by saying the boys are feeding one another in the fatal final stages of hunger. It describes their skeletal limbs and swollen bellies as having come from eating grass, tree bark, straw, worms and dirt in order to survive.

While the photo undoubtedly affected the original audience, the pathos of the image also speaks to an audience today who may be completely unaware of this famine. For viewers today, the image may bring to mind the many famines in other areas around the world, as well as images of Holocaust survivors.

Pre-Writing for Visual Analysis Essay of Historical Context

Answer the following questions to get ready to write an analysis of the image and the audience response. While each of the questions can have a single sentence answer, you can use that single sentence as the topic sentence of a paragraph and give examples and explanation to fill out that paragraph.

  1. Who is the artist?
  2. What is the purpose of this piece? Why did the artist create it?
  3. Who did the artist create the image for?
  4. What was going on at that time in art or in the culture that the artist was either reacting against or reflecting?
  5. How did the audience in that historical moment view this work?
  6. Where was it published? How would the image appeal to that audience?
  7. What was the reaction to this piece of art when it first appeared? Since then?
  8. Did the audience understand what the artist was trying to say with the image?How did the artist feel about the reaction of the audience?

Citing Images Correctly

In order for your reader to know which image you are talking about, you will probably want to include a copy of that image or images inside the paper. You will also need to make sure that in the first paragraph you include all of the information your reader needs to know, such as:

  • Title of the Image (underline or italics)
  • Artist’s name
  • Date of work
  • Where it was published or the name of museum or collection it is now in.
  • Medium: magazine advertisement, video, oil painting, marble sculpture, chalk drawing, pencil sketch, photograph (what type of image it is and what type of art medium was used)

Odor Independence Day

don’t swot up, be creative!

How to Write a Visual Argument Analysis Essay in 45 Minutes

There are different kinds of essays: reflective, argumentative, descriptive etc. However visual argument analysis essay is quite a different work. Actually there is no topic, there is just some photo or picture that student is supposed to analyze. It’s not so hard to write this kind of the assignment when you know the steps to follow. Our article will help you write it in 45 minutes. Please read the steps below to cope with your task easily:

  1. Learn the picture carefully.

Try to analyze everything you see on the picture and then write it down. Here are the points you can follow:

  • Who is the author of this piece of art?
  • What is the time of its creation?
  • What is depicted on the picture?
  • Is it animate or inanimate?
  • What is shown on the foreground and background?
  • Are there any signs or symbols? What do they mean?
  • What is the material it was done from? (Canvas, stone, metal, ivory, wood etc.)
  • What is the kind of the artwork? (sculpture, painting, drawing, photography etc.)
  • What is the art style? (surrealism, modern, realism, baroque etc.)
  • What colors predominate? What does it mean?
  • What did the artist want to say by this piece of art?
  • What is the overall impression from the picture?
  • What name suits it?
  • Build up the structure.

    After you answered all the questions above, reread the information and try to understand what is missing. Add the information you think is necessary. Then structure it.

    • There is no one generally accepted structure of a visual argument analysis essay, though anyway it should contain the introduction, body paragraphs and conclusion. The length of the paper is also not fixed. It depends on the piece of art you are going to describe.
    • In general, several sentences will be enough for the introduction. Here you can express your attitude to the picture.
    • In body paragraphs write down all the information you got after the analysis. Mind that you are working on the argument analysis essay, so you should develop the argument based on what is depicted on the picture and the evaluation of this piece of art. Each paragraph should contain its central idea which will be connected with the main idea of the whole work.
    • The conclusion, as well as the introduction, can contain only a few sentences, summarizing all your analysis.
    • Mind that analyzing any piece of art is also a kind of art as you should feel the piece of art deeply enough to interpret it and convince the reader that your interpretation is worth.
  • Visual argument essay

    Cigarette Smoking Isn’t Cool

    Cigarette smoking definitely is not an alluring thing to do for someone who is wanting to look and feel beautiful, gorgeous or sexy. It is the leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, and is responsible for claiming the lives of individuals from all age groups. Smoking not only can cause lung cancer, it also portrays bad hygiene to your peers. I for one never dream of being up close and personal with someone with rust stained teeth, or of someone who smells of ashtray perfume. Moreover, I certainly don’t want to experience the inferno breath that is released with every spoken word. But, I will always remember that person’s lingering persona, because cigarette smoking is a nasty habit that leaves me asking the question “why?” Why would someone of any age no matter how much time they anticipate living, want to torture the health and well-being of their family, friends and co-worker’s? According to the American Cancer Society, “Among infants to 18 months of age, secondhand smoke is associated with as many as 300,000 cases of bronchitis and pneumonia each year.” And the American Cancer Society also goes on to state, “Secondhand smoke from a parent’s cigarette increases a child’s chances for middle ear problems, causes coughing and wheezing, and worsens asthma conditions.”

    This is what made me stop and take a double look at the black and white photo of a beautiful middle-aged woman while perusing the American photography website. At first, I just thought this was another picture of a model trying to sell an ad for a clothing line. But then I caught site of the heading at the top of the ad which reads: “She has eyes of sparkling blue, hair as blonde as sunshine, and teeth like old linoleum. The photograph is featured as a black and white backdrop of a woman looking towards the side without a smile upon her beautiful face. The woman appears to be lost in the everyday worries of life, or maybe she chose not to smile for the camera because she knew her teeth would appear the color of rust. At the bottom of the page is the ad logo from CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) that reads: “If you think smoking makes you look cool, think again. Cigarettes stain your teeth permanently, and there is nothing cool about that.”

    The Center for Disease Control has employed the well known photographer Tom Maday who was responsible for photographing the images for the Bosnia Refugee Project and the Corkin’s Book Project to photograph this advertisement for publicity purposes.

    The CDC’s campaign to promote a smoke-free message in schools and communities uses the appeals of ethos and pathos to persuade its audience by enlisting the help and expertise of well known celebrities and cover models from Christy Turlington to Jeremy and Jason London, Boys II Men to Jeffrey Wingand, and last but not least the martial arts actor Jackie Chan. The Celebrities are asking for our help to stand strong in our community and help educate the young generation of girls and boys that smoking is not sexy, and is not an important necessity to be popular in their age group.

    The advertisement picture of the no named cover model of the woman’s picture below uses ethos to lure the young women of America. She is portraying them to visualize in their minds that smoking will not enhance your beauty, but promising them the intent to permanently stain their teeth. The pathos side of the persuasion in this advertisement leads one to believe smoking may leave an individual pondering a situation and staring off into space like the woman below. A side effect of smoking could make you feel down and depressed, maybe perhaps that is just another reason she isn’t smiling.

    In today’s fast paced society, anyone 18 years of age and older can legally purchase a pack of cigarettes, and moreover individuals younger than that are acquiring them from other means necessary in order to look like he or she is in control of one’s life. The cost of a pack of cigarettes has drastically increased in price since the 1960’s, however that doesn’t seem to be stopping anyone from purchasing this addiction. A pack of Cigarettes today tends to average an individual about $2 a pack with an annual expense of about a thousand dollars. Is cigarette smoking worth the chance of being added to the growing number of statistics that are constantly being tallied up in today’s world? It has been over 40 years since the 1st report was released by the Surgeon General, Luther Terry, M.D. informing the public of the dangerous health risks associated with tobacco usage.

    According to the CDC’s article about Cigarette smoking—related mortality “Cigarette smoking is the single most preventable cause of premature death in the United States. Each year, more than 400,000 Americans die from cigarette smoking. In fact, one in every five deaths in the United States is smoking related. Every year, smoking kills more than 276,000 men and 142,000 women.” According to the American Cancer Society, “Cigarettes contain a carcinogen called nicotine and tends to make it very difficult for someone to quit smoking because of the addiction.” The society also states, “It isn’t impossible but for those who have conquered the habit have better health than current smokers. Ex-smokers have fewer days of illness, fewer health complaints, and less bronchitis and pneumonia than current smokers.” In conclusion the Center for Disease Control and Prevention needs everyone’s help in spreading the research to young teenagers across America.

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Smoking-attributable mortality and years of potential life lost — United States, 1990. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 1993;42(33):645-8

    Visual argument essay

    As time has progressed, people in this country have become exceedingly concerned with their appearance and other physical traits. Due to this, the number of plastic surgeries, Botox injections, and steroid users has dramatically risen in recent years. As the stigma of being labeled a steroid user has diminished and the consumption of these illicit drugs has become more and more socially acceptable, there have also been an increasing number of adolescents and non-athletes using these drugs. The use of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing supplements is detrimental to both the user’s mental and physical health.

    The previously depicted cartoon supports the fact that there has been a trend towards younger steroid users in recent years. By showing an apparently muscular teenager who is eating cereal out of a bowl labeled, supplements, the author of the drawing is bringing attention to the growing problem of adolescent steroid use as well as many of the implications that can arise from the use of these illicit substances. The boy is frowning in the picture which can be interpreted to mean that the supplements he is eating are the cause of the sadness he is feeling. In addition to this, parental pressure to succeed and how it can affect the behaviors of adolescents are referenced. The leader of an experiment at Clemson University named Bryan E. Denham found that. “… the current study found AAS use to associate more significantly with the use of several drugs of abuse, including crack cocaine, Vicodin, GHB, Ketamine and Rohypnol” (Denham). In this statement it was concluded that the use of anabolic steroids (AAS) has been linked with a higher use of other illegal narcotics as well. Based on this evidence it can be concluded that the use of steroids will almost always lead to a decrease in the well-being of the user. In addition to being emotionally harmful, the use of steroids can put those who consume the substances at risk of major health problems.

    The website has a targeted audience of adolescent steroid and supplement users. This is due to the fact that if a teenager in a similar situation were to see this they would be able to relate to the male depicted in the drawing, and would then be forced to ask themselves if that is how they would like to be perceived by others. “The majority of people who abuse steroids are not athletes. They are everyday Joes and Janes who have either self-esteem issues about their bodies or are simply looking for a cosmetic quick fix” (Mannie). In this statement, the author of the quote pointed out the fact that the majority of people who frequently use steroids are not collegiate, professional, or international athletes. They are average people, many of whom have emotional insecurities about themselves in one form or another. These insecurities in addition to being under constant pressure to succeed are the impetus that has driven many steroid users to begin use of performance enhancing drugs. In combination with the features of the picture shown, aspects of the website itself have also been adjusted in order to both lend credibility to the information shown and to further interest the audience that is being targeted.

    The method by which this information is being presented tells the audience that the creator of the website has thoroughly researched the topic and is prepared to present the information to others, displaying the mode of persuasion ethos. The fact that both visual and textual evidence are used in tandem to investigate the issue surrounding steroid use in adolescents lends more credibility to the argument overall by incorporating multiple sources of information that convey the same conclusion. The audience is first shown the image of the boy consuming supplements under the praise of his mother, and given the opportunity to analyze what circumstances could have led to this situation. Next, they have the ability to compare the conclusions that they had recently made to those entailed in the linguistic description below. This process will encourage the reader to look at the issue from different viewpoints that they had not previously given any thought to. And once exposed to analyses that have a basis in claims made by credible outside sources, the audience will have the opportunity to revise their original view point on the issue in response to the recently provided information. In addition to including information that is supported by outside sources, the format of the web page was also oriented in a way that would allow for the audience to easily comprehend important aspects of both the visual and textual arguments.

    This web page appeals to logos by presenting its content in an orderly manner that will allow the audience to quickly absorb and analyze the information presented. The page accomplishes this by keeping its content limited to only information that is imperative to the success of the site’s argument, including the picture accompanied by a short descriptive text, and the writing which analyzes the content of the image. By placing the picture at the top of the page and set against a background color that contrasts with the picture color, the audience’s attention is immediately drawn to the most important aspect of the visual argument. The font of the text that was placed adjacent to the image has been set to a small size that will not detract from the attention being devoted to the analysis of the visual argument shown. This was done so that the audience would be able to easily understand the issues that are being portrayed by the visual portion of the page. As in the visual text portion, the written description of the picture is also organized into topic relevant segments which contain information that concerns a single point of the argument. These uses of the design principles, contrast and proximity, were implemented to both show the reader what topics being discussed are related to one another, and to allow them to be able to easily comprehend all information presented. Emotions that are invoked by the visual text were also accounted for when designing the web page.

    The image and accompanying description work to invoke a feeling that the use of supplements and steroids are not beneficial to one’s well-being. The main source of the appeal to pathos in the visual text is the facial expressions of the characters in image. The mother is happy that her son has become so muscular and is praising him for his rapid change in physique while her son sits frowning at the table. This could signify that the boy is consuming the supplements in order to be competitive in sports and thereby gain the praise of his parents at a cost to his own health. After viewing the image and coming to this conclusion, the reader could be further swayed towards the line of thought intended by the author of the page after having read the statistic located adjacent to the picture. Though these sources do not have a direct influence on the emotions of the audience, when combined they have the ability to make it more likely for the reader to adopt the viewpoint intended by the author.

    Pathos is the strongest of the modes of persuasion in this context. While both logos and ethos play an important role in influencing the reader to feel a certain way about the issue, pathos is the most pivotal to the success of the web page. When targeting an audience of adolescents as this article does, the most effective method of making an impact on where an individual stands concerning an issue is to allow the audience to imagine themselves in the place of the boy in the picture. When this occurs, the reader is granted insight into the emotions that would be felt in a real life scenario such as this, and is given the opportunity to develop a new and more informed stance on the issue. In order to further the emotional effect that the content of this web page has on its audience, the mood of the site was made to be somber in nature. This was achieved through keeping the background of the page unadorned and without bright colors. The purpose of leaving the audience with an overall impression such as this is to further the point that the visual and linguistic argument were making, that steroid use will rarely have anything but harmful effects.

    Overall, the process of forming the web page in which to present the argument for this issue went relatively smoothly with a few minor problems. The most challenging aspect of creating the visual argument of this page was finding a picture on a topic that held meaning to me, but also formed a strong argument and was easy to comprehend at a glance. This was in part due to the fact that many images that are related to this topic do not make a strong or clear enough argument to be the basis of an essay. One of the revisions that was made while writing the second draft of this paper was to expand on the aspects of ethos, pathos, and logos that are displayed by the web site, which greatly improved the effect of the essay overall. During this process, the ways that the format and content of the web page applied to the design principles were also addressed. These two revisions proved to be very important, and greatly improved the overall effect of the essay.

    Completing peer reviews of other web pages and reading other classmates’ opinions of my own web site aided the revisions that took place to create the final draft of this argument. By viewing other students’ visual and linguistic claims, it allowed me to formulate new ideas about my own argument that I was later able to incorporate into the essay. Similarly, reading what my classmates thought of my webpage allowed me to see flaws in the presentation of the content of the page, and I was then able to fix the problems.

    The process in which I implemented to complete this assignment allowed for ample time to revise the argument into a final product that was more effective than previous drafts. By completing the majority of the linguistic essay prior to the first draft submission, I was able to quickly finish the draft after completing the peer review process. This left me an entire week to revise the draft into a final web page that I am confident properly portrays the content and simultaneously makes an effective argument. Looking back, one minor thing that I might have done differently would have been to find a picture several days before the due date of the rough draft, so that I would have had more time to think about the arguments that I wanted to make in the first draft of the essay.

    Overall, the use of steroids and other supplements by teenagers is a growing problem in the U.S. today. These illicit drugs have been shown to have many detrimental physical and mental side effects on their users and can even function as a gateway drug, leading to the use of other, more dangerous substances. While presenting the argument protesting the use of these performance enhancing drugs, several design principles were employed in order to more clearly convey the information to the audience, and also to allow them to more easily comprehend the points that were being made. The process in which the linguistic argument was written and incorporated with the visual argument was made easier through the completion of the peer review process and by maintaining time management throughout the project, ensuring that it would be completed on schedule.

    “Dangers of Steroid Abuse.” Steroidabuse. Association Against Steroid Abuse, n.d. Web. 27 April 2012.

    Denham, Bryan E. “Association Between Narcotic Use And Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use Among American Adolescents.” Substance Use & Misuse 44.14 (2009): 2043-2061. Academic Search Premier. Web. 15 Apr. 2012.

    Mannie, Ken. “DESIGNER STEROIDS: UGLY, DANGEROUS Things.” Coach & Athletic Director 73.9 (2004): 14-17. Academic Search Premier. Web. 15 Apr. 2012

    Teenagers Taking Supplements.” Bismarcktribune. ND Cartoonist, 13 March 2008. Web. 15 April 2012.

    Visual argument essay

    As time has progressed, people in this country have become exceedingly concerned with their appearance and other physical traits. Due to this, the number of plastic surgeries, Botox injections, and steroid users has dramatically risen in recent years. As the stigma of being labeled a steroid user has diminished and the consumption of these illicit drugs has become more and more socially acceptable, there have also been an increasing number of adolescents and non-athletes using these drugs. The use of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing supplements is detrimental to both the user’s mental and physical health.

    The previously depicted cartoon supports the fact that there has been a trend towards younger steroid users in recent years. By showing an apparently muscular teenager who is eating cereal out of a bowl labeled, supplements, the author of the drawing is bringing attention to the growing problem of adolescent steroid use as well as many of the implications that can arise from the use of these illicit substances. The boy is frowning in the picture which can be interpreted to mean that the supplements he is eating are the cause of the sadness he is feeling. In addition to this, parental pressure to succeed and how it can affect the behaviors of adolescents are referenced. The leader of an experiment at Clemson University named Bryan E. Denham found that. “… the current study found AAS use to associate more significantly with the use of several drugs of abuse, including crack cocaine, Vicodin, GHB, Ketamine and Rohypnol” (Denham). In this statement it was concluded that the use of anabolic steroids (AAS) has been linked with a higher use of other illegal narcotics as well. Based on this evidence it can be concluded that the use of steroids will almost always lead to a decrease in the well-being of the user. In addition to being emotionally harmful, the use of steroids can put those who consume the substances at risk of major health problems.

    The website has a targeted audience of adolescent steroid and supplement users. This is due to the fact that if a teenager in a similar situation were to see this they would be able to relate to the male depicted in the drawing, and would then be forced to ask themselves if that is how they would like to be perceived by others. “The majority of people who abuse steroids are not athletes. They are everyday Joes and Janes who have either self-esteem issues about their bodies or are simply looking for a cosmetic quick fix” (Mannie). In this statement, the author of the quote pointed out the fact that the majority of people who frequently use steroids are not collegiate, professional, or international athletes. They are average people, many of whom have emotional insecurities about themselves in one form or another. These insecurities in addition to being under constant pressure to succeed are the impetus that has driven many steroid users to begin use of performance enhancing drugs. In combination with the features of the picture shown, aspects of the website itself have also been adjusted in order to both lend credibility to the information shown and to further interest the audience that is being targeted.

    The method by which this information is being presented tells the audience that the creator of the website has thoroughly researched the topic and is prepared to present the information to others, displaying the mode of persuasion ethos. The fact that both visual and textual evidence are used in tandem to investigate the issue surrounding steroid use in adolescents lends more credibility to the argument overall by incorporating multiple sources of information that convey the same conclusion. The audience is first shown the image of the boy consuming supplements under the praise of his mother, and given the opportunity to analyze what circumstances could have led to this situation. Next, they have the ability to compare the conclusions that they had recently made to those entailed in the linguistic description below. This process will encourage the reader to look at the issue from different viewpoints that they had not previously given any thought to. And once exposed to analyses that have a basis in claims made by credible outside sources, the audience will have the opportunity to revise their original view point on the issue in response to the recently provided information. In addition to including information that is supported by outside sources, the format of the web page was also oriented in a way that would allow for the audience to easily comprehend important aspects of both the visual and textual arguments.

    This web page appeals to logos by presenting its content in an orderly manner that will allow the audience to quickly absorb and analyze the information presented. The page accomplishes this by keeping its content limited to only information that is imperative to the success of the site’s argument, including the picture accompanied by a short descriptive text, and the writing which analyzes the content of the image. By placing the picture at the top of the page and set against a background color that contrasts with the picture color, the audience’s attention is immediately drawn to the most important aspect of the visual argument. The font of the text that was placed adjacent to the image has been set to a small size that will not detract from the attention being devoted to the analysis of the visual argument shown. This was done so that the audience would be able to easily understand the issues that are being portrayed by the visual portion of the page. As in the visual text portion, the written description of the picture is also organized into topic relevant segments which contain information that concerns a single point of the argument. These uses of the design principles, contrast and proximity, were implemented to both show the reader what topics being discussed are related to one another, and to allow them to be able to easily comprehend all information presented. Emotions that are invoked by the visual text were also accounted for when designing the web page.

    The image and accompanying description work to invoke a feeling that the use of supplements and steroids are not beneficial to one’s well-being. The main source of the appeal to pathos in the visual text is the facial expressions of the characters in image. The mother is happy that her son has become so muscular and is praising him for his rapid change in physique while her son sits frowning at the table. This could signify that the boy is consuming the supplements in order to be competitive in sports and thereby gain the praise of his parents at a cost to his own health. After viewing the image and coming to this conclusion, the reader could be further swayed towards the line of thought intended by the author of the page after having read the statistic located adjacent to the picture. Though these sources do not have a direct influence on the emotions of the audience, when combined they have the ability to make it more likely for the reader to adopt the viewpoint intended by the author.

    Pathos is the strongest of the modes of persuasion in this context. While both logos and ethos play an important role in influencing the reader to feel a certain way about the issue, pathos is the most pivotal to the success of the web page. When targeting an audience of adolescents as this article does, the most effective method of making an impact on where an individual stands concerning an issue is to allow the audience to imagine themselves in the place of the boy in the picture. When this occurs, the reader is granted insight into the emotions that would be felt in a real life scenario such as this, and is given the opportunity to develop a new and more informed stance on the issue. In order to further the emotional effect that the content of this web page has on its audience, the mood of the site was made to be somber in nature. This was achieved through keeping the background of the page unadorned and without bright colors. The purpose of leaving the audience with an overall impression such as this is to further the point that the visual and linguistic argument were making, that steroid use will rarely have anything but harmful effects.

    Overall, the process of forming the web page in which to present the argument for this issue went relatively smoothly with a few minor problems. The most challenging aspect of creating the visual argument of this page was finding a picture on a topic that held meaning to me, but also formed a strong argument and was easy to comprehend at a glance. This was in part due to the fact that many images that are related to this topic do not make a strong or clear enough argument to be the basis of an essay. One of the revisions that was made while writing the second draft of this paper was to expand on the aspects of ethos, pathos, and logos that are displayed by the web site, which greatly improved the effect of the essay overall. During this process, the ways that the format and content of the web page applied to the design principles were also addressed. These two revisions proved to be very important, and greatly improved the overall effect of the essay.

    Completing peer reviews of other web pages and reading other classmates’ opinions of my own web site aided the revisions that took place to create the final draft of this argument. By viewing other students’ visual and linguistic claims, it allowed me to formulate new ideas about my own argument that I was later able to incorporate into the essay. Similarly, reading what my classmates thought of my webpage allowed me to see flaws in the presentation of the content of the page, and I was then able to fix the problems.

    The process in which I implemented to complete this assignment allowed for ample time to revise the argument into a final product that was more effective than previous drafts. By completing the majority of the linguistic essay prior to the first draft submission, I was able to quickly finish the draft after completing the peer review process. This left me an entire week to revise the draft into a final web page that I am confident properly portrays the content and simultaneously makes an effective argument. Looking back, one minor thing that I might have done differently would have been to find a picture several days before the due date of the rough draft, so that I would have had more time to think about the arguments that I wanted to make in the first draft of the essay.

    Overall, the use of steroids and other supplements by teenagers is a growing problem in the U.S. today. These illicit drugs have been shown to have many detrimental physical and mental side effects on their users and can even function as a gateway drug, leading to the use of other, more dangerous substances. While presenting the argument protesting the use of these performance enhancing drugs, several design principles were employed in order to more clearly convey the information to the audience, and also to allow them to more easily comprehend the points that were being made. The process in which the linguistic argument was written and incorporated with the visual argument was made easier through the completion of the peer review process and by maintaining time management throughout the project, ensuring that it would be completed on schedule.

    “Dangers of Steroid Abuse.” Steroidabuse. Association Against Steroid Abuse, n.d. Web. 27 April 2012.

    Denham, Bryan E. “Association Between Narcotic Use And Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use Among American Adolescents.” Substance Use & Misuse 44.14 (2009): 2043-2061. Academic Search Premier. Web. 15 Apr. 2012.

    Mannie, Ken. “DESIGNER STEROIDS: UGLY, DANGEROUS Things.” Coach & Athletic Director 73.9 (2004): 14-17. Academic Search Premier. Web. 15 Apr. 2012

    Teenagers Taking Supplements.” Bismarcktribune. ND Cartoonist, 13 March 2008. Web. 15 April 2012.

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