What is a five paragraph essay (order an essay inexpensively)

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The Five-Paragraph

Introduction:


Introductory Paragraph

See, first, Writing Introductory Paragraphs for different ways of getting your reader involved in your essay. The introductory paragraph should also include the thesis statement, a kind of mini-outline for the paper: it tells the reader what the essay is about. The last sentence of this paragraph must also contain a transitional “hook” which moves the reader to the first paragraph of the body of the paper.

Body — First paragraph:

The first paragraph of the body should contain the strongest argument, most significant example, cleverest illustration, or an obvious beginning point. The first sentence of this paragraph should include the “reverse hook” which ties in with the transitional hook at the end of the introductory paragraph. The topic for this paragraph should be in the first or second sentence. This topic should relate to the thesis statement in the introductory paragraph. The last sentence in this paragraph should include a transitional hook to tie into the second paragraph of the body.

Body — Second paragraph:

The second paragraph of the body should contain the second strongest argument, second most significant example, second cleverest illustration, or an obvious follow up the first paragraph in the body. The first sentence of this paragraph should include the reverse hook which ties in with the transitional hook at the end of the first paragraph of the body. The topic for this paragraph should be in the first or second sentence. This topic should relate to the thesis statement in the introductory paragraph. The last sentence in this paragraph should include a transitional hook to tie into the third paragraph of the body.

Body — Third paragraph:

The third paragraph of the body should contain the weakest argument, weakest example, weakest illustration, or an obvious follow up to the second paragraph in the body. The first sentence of this paragraph should include the reverse hook which ties in with the transitional hook at the end of the second paragraph. The topic for this paragraph should be in the first or second sentence. This topic should relate to the thesis statement in the introductory paragraph. The last sentence in this paragraph should include a transitional concluding hook that signals the reader that this is the final major point being made in this paper. This hook also leads into the last, or concluding, paragraph.

Conclusion:


Concluding paragraph:

This paragraph should include the following:

  1. an allusion to the pattern used in the introductory paragraph,
  2. a restatement of the thesis statement, using some of the original language or language that “echoes” the original language. (The restatement, however, must not be a duplicate thesis statement.)
  3. a summary of the three main points from the body of the paper.
  4. a final statement that gives the reader signals that the discussion has come to an end. (This final statement may be a “call to action” in an persuasive paper.)

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How to Write a 5 Paragraph Essay

The 5 paragraph essay is considered to be the standard essay writing assignment. It is used in most exams such as TOEFL, IELTS, and the SAT. Since most of these exams limit the student time-wise in the "Writing" section, students are trained to memorize this format. This allows the student to answer the exam prompt quickly and efficiently. The format’s plasticity allows students to experiment with various essay styles. Persuasive, Argumentative, Expository, Narrative and Cause and Effect can all adapt to this format. As a result, perfecting the 5 paragraph essay is a practice that can turn a rookie into an experienced essay writer.

Good Example Topics

  • Can one learn a life lesson from an experience that they didn’t have? Can you learn from other people’s mistakes?
  • Is animal testing ethical?
  • Should same-sex marriage be allowed?
  • Should laws on gun-control be more strict?
  • Should the death penalty be abolished completely?
  • Should marijuana be legalized?
  • Should education be free for all students?

The paper topics listed above are some of the most common topics students write essays about. Of course, they are not limited to only these. Before choosing a topic and start the writing process, students should look to come up with a catchy title. The reason for doing so is centered around grabbing the readers attention right from the get go.

This type of essay has a very specific outline; It starts with an Introduction, goes to Body Paragraph 1, Body Paragraph 2, Body Paragraph 3, and sums things up with a Conclusion. Each body paragraph serves a specific purpose, and the essay is in the form of a keyhole. This means that it starts out very BROAD, gets more NARROW and finishes out BROAD.

Introduction: 3-5 Sentences

  • The introduction sets the structure for the rest of the essay, with the first sentence being the HOOK sentence.
  • The Hook Sentence is kind of like the spark to a flame; It grabs the reader’s attention.
  • The Hook is usually either a rhetorical question or some life example or a stunning fact

For Example: If your essay is about the preservation of our environment, you could say something like: "Do we want to live on a planet where we are surrounded by desert and wasteland?"

This is a rhetorical question, meaning it does not need an answer because it is obvious.

Brief Introduction of Supporting Arguments (1-3)

Here you are taking your supporting arguments and briefly introducing them to the reader without revealing too much information.

Tip: Think of it as a trailer for a movie, like it should be exciting but can’t give away the “PLOT”.

Example: Preservation of our environment is one of the keys to keeping our planet in a healthy state.

Thesis Statement

  • The most important part of your entire essay; this is your argument .
  • This statement will be the basis for the rest of your custom essay
  • Since we are talking about nature preservation, an example of a good thesis would be:
  • “The preservation of our planet is the most important aspect of keeping Mother Nature in check and avoiding draconian disasters.”

Quick Tip: if you find that your body paragraphs have nothing to do with your thesis, you can go back and change the thesis.

Body Paragraphs 1,2,3 (5-7 Sentences)

  • This is the “meat” of your 5 paragraph essay, where you explain the side you are defending (Thesis Sentence)
  • Structure of the body paragraphs is usually: Intro sentence (1), Supporting Argument
  • Explanation (3-5), Concluding Sentence (1)
  • Intro sentence should briefly bring out your argument without revealing too much information
  • Example: Deforestation and air pollution not only hurt’s the planet but reduces air quality and increases the likelihood of disease!
  • Supporting Argument and Explanation: This is taking the topic and going into detail, while still most importantly DEFENDING YOUR THESIS!
  • Example: Greed and selfishness are big players that damage our environment with methods that kill our trees and worsen our air. Though short term it may be profitable for the few, long-term it is hazardous for all. In Beijing for example, the air quality is so poor that it is mandatory to wear masks just for its large population to walk around in the streets.
  • The Concluding Sentence should be the opposite of the intro: instead of introducing your argument, you are briefly concluding your argument, transitioning into your next one.
  • Example: To conclude, the destruction of our natural resources and our air quality not only worsens the planet’s health, but humanity’s as well.

THE FORMAT FOR ALL 3 BODY PARAGRAPHS IS THE SAME

  • The arguments should go in this order:
  • First body paragraph should be your second strongest argument
  • Second body should be your weakest argument
  • Third body should be your strongest argument

To give our readers a nice keyhole format visual, we have a picture of a standard Graphic Organizer below.

Conclusion (3-5 Sentences): This is the “mirror” of your intro

  • Restating Your Thesis (Sentence 1): You take your main argument (thesis) and restate it in a conclusive way. You are paraphrasing it in an assertive manner to show that you have “proved your point.”
  • Example: The safety and survival of the Earth are incredibly dependent upon how we as people decide to treat it, and the more carefully we nourish the process, the more beneficial it will be for all.
  • Concluding your supporting arguments (1-3 Sentences): This is taking your supporting arguments (your body paragraphs) and rephrasing the main points you made in one sentence per paragraph.
  • If some of your supporting arguments are similar then you can combine them into one sentence to keep the good structure.
  • So for example, if one of your supporting arguments was about limiting the use of resources, you could say “Limiting the use of our natural resources and improving their efficiency are key steps in improving the health of our planet.”

Concluding Hook Sentence (Optional)

A good way to end an essay is something unexpected, to surprise the reader.

Create a second hook, but this time it should be a hook that SUMS things up in a few words, rhetorical questions are good for this.

Example: “The health of our planet is of great importance, and after all, we don’t want to live in a wasteland do we?”

This gives the 5 paragraph essay some spice at the end and makes the reader question your statement.

General Grading Rubric

Several schools and universities worldwide use several different types of rubrics, but one of the most standard rubric styles is the 5 point style, where it is broken down into 5 segments: Focus, Organization, Conventions, Style, and Content.

  • Focus: Did the writer spends his time proving his thesis? Did he accomplish his goal?
  • Organization: Was the essay readable? Were the transitions between paragraphs smooth? Did the writer follow the proper outline format and not diverge from the set structure?
  • Conventions: Did the writer make many grammatical mistakes? Did they have run on sentences?
  • Style: Did the writer use high-level vocabulary, were words rarely repeated, how creative were his sentence structures?
  • Content: Did the writer properly prove his argument? Were his statements logical and factual? Did he create strong arguments?

Essay Writing Advice From Our Professional Writers

A five paragraph essay is the first big writing assignment that your teacher will have you do in middle school! If you’re a beginner essayist, then my tip for you is to learn how to ensure that each paragraph has its own unique idea. Once you’ve mastered that, you can practice making your paragraphs flow into each other with transition sentences. Later on, in high school and college, this will be a very valuable skill to have. Connect your ideas together so your readers can follow along with ease. While writing, always keeps in mind what your next paragraph is about and try to lead up to it. In the first essays that you write, using words like “Firstly, Secondly, and In conclusion” is acceptable, but later on, you will need to find ways to separate your ideas without those linking words. Don’t make them a habit. Good luck with your writing!

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What is a five paragraph essay

Have you ever made an awesome chocolate cake without looking at a recipe first? Unless you are an extremely talented baker, most likely the answer is “no.” Just one cup of flour too many and your chocolate dessert will be a chocolate mess!

The same goes for writing a 5-paragraph essay. If you are an extremely talented writer, you may be able to intuitively create a compelling essay with all the components needed to be both persuasive and easy to swallow…or follow.

However, if writing doesn’t come easily to you, you can benefit from creating a 5-paragraph essay outline before jumping into your writing assignment. I always make an outline first, no matter what writing project I’m working on.

There are endless, different ways to write a compelling essay. But, if your teacher is demanding that you sum up your argument in five succinct paragraphs, follow this easy tutorial on how to create a 5-paragraph essay outline.

Structure of the 5-Paragraph Essay Outline

The 5-paragraph essay is made of…you guessed it…five paragraphs. Each paragraph serves a specific purpose:

  • Paragraph 1: Amazing introduction (hook) and the all-important thesis statement
  • Paragraph 2: Argument A and supporting facts or quotes
  • Paragraph 3: Argument B and supporting facts or quotes
  • Paragraph 4: Argument C and supporting facts or quotes
  • Paragraph 5: Conclusion, made up of your restated thesis and the broader significance of your argument

Here’s how this outline would look if you sketched it out:

A Note on Formatting Your 5-Paragraph Essay Outline

Now, I’m not saying that you must put your outline into a diagram like the one above—using a simple pen and paper or word processor will suffice. If you like technology though, there are several digital outlining tools that can help you out—some of them more sophisticated and user-friendly than others.

It’s not really about making a perfect 5-paragraph essay outline, rather, it’s about developing an outline that makes the most sense to you. An outline ensures that you have the necessary components to write an awesome essay.

Without further delay, let’s jump into more detail about each of the outline components.

Step One: Identify Your Topic

First we need a topic. Typically, your instructor will give you a subject to write about, or at least parameters for a topic. Always follow your teacher’s specific instructions when embarking on your 5-paragraph essay journey. After all, you don’t want the wrath of your instructor to come down upon you for completely ignoring instructions.

For our sample topic, we’re going to use the following prompt:

What are the arguments for or against writing a 5-paragraph essay? Should teachers continue requesting this writing method from students?

Step Two: Take a Stance on Your Topic

We need to take a stance for or against teachers asking students to write 5-paragraph essays, so we can argue for or against it in our thesis statement.

Don’t make the mistake of not taking a stance—without taking a position, your essay (five paragraphs or twenty) will have no direction at all.

When deciding on your position, you have to choose one that can be backed with valid and supportable arguments, either from your research or from the course materials provided in your class.

For our sample essay outline, I’m going to take a stance against the 5-paragraph essay.

Step Three: Write a Clear Thesis Statement

Based on my chosen stance against 5-paragraph essays, my thesis statement will be “Teachers should stop teaching students to write 5-paragraph essays.”

Notice the word “should” in the thesis statement? More power can be added to your position by creating a statement about what should or shouldn’t be done. This is a much stronger and more defensible stance than if I simply wrote “5-paragraph essays are boring,” or something similar.

Step Four: Develop Three Arguments to Underscore Your Thesis

Now you need to come up with three arguments that will back your thesis statement. Here are mine:

The 5-paragraph essay is too basic.

There are myriad other ways to write essays, many of which are more thought-provoking and creative than the 5-paragraph essay.

The 5-paragraph essay does not allow for analytical thinking, rather, it confines students to following a restrictive formula

Step Five: Develop Three Supports for Each of Your Arguments

Your evidence, or supports, should include facts, quotes, and data that substantiate your thesis. This is a great place to include quotes directly from your research sources.

For example, to support argument A (“The 5-paragraph essay is too basic”), I might offer the following evidence:

  • Support 1A: Chicago teacher Ray Salazar says, “The five-paragraph essay is rudimentary, unengaging, and useless.”
  • Support 2A:Elizabeth Guzik of California State University, Long Beach says, “The five paragraph essay encourages students to engage only on the surface level without attaining the level of cogency demanded by college writing.”

Similarly, in regards to argument C (“The 5-paragraph essay does not allow for analytical thinking, rather, it confines students to following a restrictive formula”), I might support it with this quote:

  • Support 1C: According to an article in Education Week, “There is a consensus among college writing professors that ‘students are coming [to college] prepared to do five-paragraph themes and arguments but [are] radically unprepared in thinking analytically.’”

Remember, for the 5-paragraph essay structure, you typically need to come up with three supports for each of your three arguments. In our example, I only show three of the total nine supports needed to round out the argument.

Step Six: Develop Your Intro Hook

Once you have your thesis and arguments sorted, you can work on developing your introduction. (*Hint* it’s an exercise in futility to develop your introduction first, because you won’t really know what you’re introducing yet.)

For example, my hook could be, “English teachers across the nation have been teaching students to become ineffective writers.” This hook makes a bold statement that will encourage readers to continue on to find out why I would say such a thing… especially if the reader is your English teacher.

Step Seven: Develop Your Conclusion

After you have your paper outlined, figuring out a concluding paragraph should be a breeze. In a traditional 5-paragraph essay, the first step in writing your conclusion is to restate your thesis using different words.

For example, I might write, “The 5-paragraph essay is an outdated and useless writing tool that should be phased out of the classroom.”

To close out the paper, I would open a discussion on the broader significance of this argument. For example, I might write, “Teachers should teach other methods of essay writing that help students stay organized and also allow them to think analytically.”

What’s Next?

Now that you’ve established all the components of your 5-paragraph essay outline, you’ll need to actually sit down, avoid social media for a while (I know, it’s hard), and write your 5-paragraph essay. Believe me, it will be much easier to do now that your thoughts are organized and you have somewhere to start.

Ask any writer. There is nothing more frightening than the pure white of an empty page. An outline is a great remedy for this.

Oh, and a couple more things:

As you start writing, you’ll want to be sure to connect all the pieces of your essay together with strong transition sentences. Don’t just line up the notes from your outline and call it done.

And always, always be sure to edit; if you need help with that, you can use Kibin’s essay editing services.

Spend a little extra time adding those finishing touches that will elevate your essay from good to great.

How about you? Do you work from an outline? Or are you more accustomed to writing by the seat of your pants? Let us know in the comments.

Psst. 98% of Kibin users report better grades! Get inspiration from over 500,000 example essays.

About the Author

Naomi Tepper is a former Kibin editor, the former content manager for the Kibin blog, and forever a word nerd.

Essay Writing for Standardized Tests: Tips for Writing a Five Paragraph Essay

Most, if not all, high school and college standardized tests include a writing portion. Students are provided a writing prompt and must then write an essay on the topic. Writing for standardized tests can strike fear in the hearts and minds of students of all ages, but it doesn’t have to. If you know what to expect and understand how to write a five paragraph essay, you will be prepared to tackle any essay writing prompt.

Types of Essays on Standardized Tests

When you begin to write your essay for a standardized test, you must first decide what type of essay you are being asked to write. There are many different types of essays, including narrative, expository, argumentative, persuasive, comparative, literary, and so on. The type of essay will determine your topic and thesis. Essays for standardized tests are typically either persuasive, in which you will answer a question, or literary, in which you will write about something you read.

For standardized tests, students usually have to write a five paragraph essay, which should be 500 to 800 words long and include an introductory paragraph, three supporting paragraphs and a concluding paragraph.

The First Paragraph: The Introduction

The first paragraph will introduce your topic. The introduction is the most important paragraph because it provides direction for the entire essay. It also sets the tone, and you want to grab the reader’s attention with interest and clarity. The best way to tackle the introduction is to:

  • Describe your main idea, or what the essay is about, in one sentence. You can usually use the essay writing prompt or question to form this sentence.
  • Develop a thesis statement, or what you want to say about the main idea. When the writing prompt is a question, your thesis is typically the answer to the question.
  • List three points or arguments that support your thesis in order of importance (one sentence for each).

Voila! You’ve just written your introductory paragraph.

The Second, Third and Fourth Paragraphs: Supporting Details

These three paragraphs form the body of the essay. They provide details, such as facts, quotes, examples and concrete statistics, for the three points in your introductory paragraph that support your thesis. Take the points you listed in your introduction and discuss each in one body paragraph. Here’s how:

  • First, write a topic sentence that summarizes your point. This is the first sentence of your paragraph.
  • Next, write your argument, or why you feel the topic sentence is true.
  • Finally, present your evidence (facts, quotes, examples, and statistics) to support your argument.

Now you have a body paragraph. Repeat for points two and three. The best part about introducing your main points in the first paragraph is that it provides an outline for your body paragraphs and eliminates the need to write in transitions between paragraphs.

The Fifth Paragraph: The Conclusion

The concluding paragraph must summarize the essay. This is often the most difficult paragraph to write. In your conclusion, you should restate the thesis and connect it with the body of the essay in a sentence that explains how each point supports the thesis. Your final sentence should uphold your main idea in a clear and compelling manner. Be sure you do not present any new information in the conclusion.

Parting Thoughts

When writing an essay for a standardized test, outline your essay and get through each paragraph as quickly as possible. Think of it as a rough draft. When your time is up, a complete essay will score more points than an incomplete essay because the evaluator is expecting a beginning, middle and an end.

If you have time to review your essay before your time is up, by all means do so! Make any revisions that you think will enhance your “rough draft” and be sure to check for any grammatical errors or misspellings.

Online instruction like the Time4Writing essay writing courses for elementary, middle and high school students can help children prepare for state and college-entrance standardized writing tests. These interactive writing classes build basic writing skills, explain essay types and structure, and teach students how to organize their ideas.

For general tips on test preparation and details about each state’s standardized tests, please visit our standardized test overview page.

Study Guides and Strategies

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Study guides

Writing assignment series

The Five Paragraph Essay

The five paragraph essay measures a student’s basic writing skills,

and is often a timed exercise.

Use this Guide to help you practice and succeed at this form of writing.

Getting started means getting organized:

Analyze the assignment; determine what is required.

With a highlighter, note important words that define the topic.

Then organize your plan

For example, you have been given this writing prompt:

You have a present that was really memorable. It could have been given for an important occasion or just for no reason at all. Tell us about the present and why it was memorable. Include the reason it was given, a description of it, and how you felt when you got it.

The objective is to write a narrative essay about this present you were given

The subject is a memorable present

The three main subtopics are:

Outline your five paragraph essay; include these elements:

General Topic Sentence: memorable present

  1. Subtopic One: the reason it was given
  2. Subtopic Two: a description of it
  3. Subtopic Three: how you felt when you got it
  4. (Transition)

First Supporting Paragraph

  1. Restate Subtopic One
  2. Supporting Details or Examples
  3. (Transition)

Second Supporting Paragraph

  1. Restate Subtopic Two
  2. Supporting Details or Examples
  3. (Transition)

Third Supporting Paragraph

  1. Restate Subtopic Three
  2. Supporting Details or Examples
  3. (Transition)

Closing or Summary Paragraph

  1. Synthesis and conclusion of the thesis
  2. Rephrasing main topic and subtopics.

Write the essay!

Think small; build the full essay gradually.

Divide your essay into sections and develop each piece separately and incrementally.

The Introductory Paragraph

It not only introduces the topic, but where you are going with it (the thesis). If you do a good job in the opening, you will draw your reader into your “experience.” Put effort up front, and you will reap rewards.

  • Write in the active voice

    It is much more powerful. Do that for each sentence in the introductory essay. Unless you are writing a personal narrative, do not use the pronoun “I.”

  • Varying sentence structure

    Review to avoid the same dull pattern of always starting with the subject of the sentence.

  • Brainstorm to find the best supporting ideas

    The best supporting ideas are the ones about which you have some knowledge. If you do not know about them, you cannot do a good job writing about them. Don’t weaken the essay with ineffective argument.

  • Practice writing introductory paragraphs on various topics

    Even if you do not use them, they can be compared with the type of writing you are doing now. It is rewarding to see a pattern of progress.

    • Write a transition to establish the sub-topic

    The transition can be included in the topic sentence.

  • Supporting ideas, examples, details must be specific to the sub-topic

    The tendency in supporting paragraphs is to put in just about anything.

    Avoid this: the work you have made above with details and examples will help you keep focused.

  • Vary sentence structure

    Avoid repetitious pronouns and lists

    Avoid beginning sentences the same way (subject + verb + direct object).

  • The Ending or Summary Paragraph

    You cannot assume that the reader sees your point

    • Restate the introductory thesis/paragraph with originality

    Do not simply copy the first paragraph

  • Summarize your argument with some degree of authority

    this paragraph should leave your reader with no doubt as to your position or conclusion of logic

  • Be powerful as this is the last thought that you are leaving with the reader.
  • Edit and revise your essay

    Check your spelling and grammar

    Examine your whole essay for logic

    Thought builds and flows?

    Avoid gaps in logic, or too much detail.

    Review individual sentences

    Avoid passive constructions and the verb “to be”

  • Use transitional words and phrases

    Avoid sentences beginning with pronouns, constructions as “There are. “

    Example: “There is a need to proofread all works” becomes “Proofreading is a must.”

  • Be concise

    though vary the length and structure of sentences

  • Ask a knowledgeable friend to review and comment on your essay

    Seven stages of writing assignments:

    Index | Develop your topic (1) | Identify your audience (2) |

    Writing assignments

    Writing for the "Web" | The five-paragraph essay | Essays for a literature class |

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