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Resume Builder

Introducing the world’s smartest resume builder. Choose from thousands of industry-specific bullet points and write a professional application in minutes. It’s free!

    • Why Use Resume Genius?

      Our state-of-the-art online resume maker software makes writing one completely stress free and faster than ever before. Read why you should try our resume builder today.

    • RG Reviews & Testimonials

      We’ve helped millions of people find employment with our resume builder. See what happy employment seekers are saying about our builder.

    • Learn about the experts, career gurus, and software wizards at RG. See why our resume builder is the best of its kind of the web.

      Resume Samples

      Need inspiration? Our samples give perfect guidelines for you to follow to make the best application for your industry. Use our writing guides to land more interviews, faster.

      Resume Templates

      We have several HR-approved template styles that are good for all types of employment seekers. We’ve separated them out into different categories to help you choose faster. They are free to download.

    • Basic Templates

      These templates are minimalist, yet highly effective. If you want to play it safe with a battle-tested template, this choice is for you. These templates are straight from our resume builder.

    • Career Objective Templates

      Hiring managers love to see the critical information they’re looking for at the top of your resume. Use these templates to make sure you’re putting your best foot forward right away.

    • Professional Profile Templates

      The professional profile introduction is rapidly becoming a favorite of hiring managers. Browse our professional profile template library and find one that suits your taste.

        How to Write a Resume

        Don’t know the basics? Learn from this comprehensive guide. Leave questions in the comments and we’ll respond within a day.

      • Resume Fonts, Margins, & Paper Selection Guidelines

        Your template’s looks shouldn’t be important, but it is. Learn how to make a beautiful template that will leave hiring managers saying, “wow!”

        Downloadable Cover Letter Examples

        Browse through our library of industry-specific cover letter samples. Get inspiration on how to create a cover letter that fits your career path. Download the ones you like and simply add your own information.

      • How to Write Your Cover Letter

        Use our cover letter writing guide to learn how to format it for applicant tracking systems. Don’t forget to download our cover letter checklist to discover what you might be missing.

      • Cover Letter Builder

        Create a convincing cover letter in minutes with our state of the art software. Our builder knows exactly which template you need to use based off of your work and personal life situation, then you just fill in the blanks.

      • How to Write a Thank You Note

        Writing an artful thank you note can help you make a lasting impression, or even help you recover from a bad interview. Learn our best tips and tricks inside.

          The Longest Action Verb List in the Universe

          Action verbs give your resume “oomph.” Use our ‘longest action verb list in history’ to give yourself a boost.

        • Resignation Letter Samples & Templates

          Browse our database of free resignation letter sample and templates. To write the best resignation letter possible, customize our templates, or use our tips to write your own.

        • Common Interview Questions & Answers

          Just how should you answer those confounding interview questions? We constantly update this list of common interview questions and answers to ensure you’re as prepared as possible.

          How To Write a Professional Profile

          By Erik Episcopo

          Want to add some “oomph” to your resume? Try adding a professional profile.

          Adding a profile to your resume is like putting an elevator in a ten-story building. It can help get the hiring manager to exactly where they want to go in a hurry. It enhances the readability of your resume, thus making it hiring manager-friendly.

          What is a Professional Profile?

          Sometimes referred to as a professional summary, a profile is a detailed synopsis of your skills and expertise. Depending on your preference, it can be written in paragraph form or a bullet point list.

          Consider these two styles for your profile:

          Profile in Bullet Form

          Profile in Paragraph Form

          We know what you are thinking, “Well, what’s the difference between the qualifications summary, career objective, and professional profile?”

          What is the difference between a Career Objective, Qualifications Summary, and Professional Profile?

          The beginning of your resume is essentially the “elevator speech” through which you introduce yourself to the hiring manager.

          This is the million-dollar question. The beginning of your resume is essentially the “elevator speech” through which you introduce yourself to the hiring manager.

          All three styles have the same purpose—to grab the attention of the hiring manager by highlighting your qualifications that are relevant to the position. However the method by which they deliver this information differs slightly.

          Elements of a career objective

          • Position-centered
          • Customized to a specific job description
          • Often styled as a statement of 2-3 sentences

          Compare a career objective and professional profile below:

          Laborer with Career Objective

          Laborer Professional Profile

          Elements of a qualifications summary

          • Focuses more on your career achievements
          • Consists of 5-6 bullet points that showcase your most impressive accomplishments
          • Applicant-tracking system friendly because it targets specific keywords related to the job

          Compare the qualifications summary and a professional profile below:

          Janitor Qualifications Summary

          Janitor Professional Profile

          Elements of a professional profile:

          • A mix of both a career objective and qualifications summary
          • Can be styled as either a paragraph or bullet point list
          • Since they are not necessarily targeting a specific position, professional profiles are great when uploading your resume to job search sites and networking resumes

          Not sure how to choose between the three above? Then use our “Resume Introduction” Flow Chart.

          The profile is a bit more structured than the career objective or qualifications summary as it focuses on four key points.

          The Four Points of a Professional Profile

          Depending on how much experience you have, your profile can include an additional point. With that being said, we recommend not going over five points in your professional profile as you risk losing the attention of the hiring manager. To maintain readability, try aiming for 500 hundred characters or less as a rule of thumb.

          Point #1: Years of Experience or Education

          Leading your resume profile with your experience will garner the attention of the hiring manager and prove your ability to satisfy the duties of the position.

          You should begin with a statement declaring your years of experience in a particular position. Leading with your experience will garner the attention of the hiring manager and prove your ability to satisfy the duties of the position. Make sure to include your job title.

          Here is an example of how your first point might look like for an accountant:

          • “A certified public accountant with 5+ years of experience in ledger processes and account reconciliations.”

          Here’s how the first point of a recent graduate might sound like:

          • “A recent graduate of the School of Accounting at James Madison University, with in-depth knowledge in corporate financing and operational accounting.”

          Point #2: Specialty Area of Experience

          The next point should mention a particular specialty within the industry that you possess. This will prove that you are an expert in your field. hiring ghostwriters If you can’t think of a specialty, consider adding a job duty that you feel you excel at.

          Here’s an example:

          • “An expert at performing large enterprise audits of $100 million.”

          Notice how the point above quantifies their specialty to help give their point more weight and further attract the hiring manager.

          Try to add measurable or quantifiable points to your resume profile whenever possible.

          Point #3: The Skills That Pay the Bills

          In your third point, you should showcase your skills that you will be able to contribute to the specific job. Do research on the skills your industry values the most and add those that you possess. If you are changing your career path, consider skills that might transfer into your new career prospects. Also, if you have any certifications or licenses pertinent to your industry be sure to add them here.

          Check out this example from our accountant:

          • “Possess comprehensive knowledge of database software, and strong oral communication in English and Spanish.”

          Point #4: Achievements

          Stating that you received 1st place at the state fair for the hot dog eating contest won’t impress an employer looking for an accountant.

          Your final point should stress your career achievements. Remember that relevance is the key. Stating that you received 1st place at the state fair for the hot dog eating contest won’t impress an employer looking for an accountant. Instead, add achievements that are applicable to the industry. If you have multiple achievements feel free to add a 5th point to your profile.

          Here’s what our accountant added:

          • “Corrected errors within our annual budget analysis which lead to a 15% reduction of costs.”

          Add a Professional Profile to your LinkedIn Page

          Just like with your resume, your LinkedIn page should also include an “elevator speech” to help employers navigate through your experience. A LinkedIn summary provides an employer with a quick introduction that highlights your achievements and expertise.

          Adding a well written profile to your LinkedIn page gives you a stronger online presence and increase your likelihood of getting noticed by HR.

          The rules are generally the same as the resume profile guidelines above, but there are a few specific tips to consider when structuring your LinkedIn profile:

          • Target a specific audience
          • Make it scannable/Break it up with headings
          • Focus on quantifying your accomplishments
          • Fill up the entire section
          • Add graphics

          The debate on how to begin your resume will continue to rage on, but we hope these tips drown out the noise and allow you to make the right decision. Adding these four points to your professional profile will create an effective and enticing introduction to your resume.

          Looking for a Great Professional Profile Resume Template?

          Check out our gallery of HR-approved, battle-tested Professional Profile templates. They are free to download, and will help you land interviews faster:

          If you have any questions, feel free to comment below.

          As always, great advice! Thanks for sharing!

          Thanks Nina! Feel free to share our advice!

          awesome guide! I have a question: I tried to have everything on one page and I think I managed, with joining some bullet points, but I couldn’t find extra space for “interpersonal skills”. I am thinking about removing this point from resume. Please advice if “decision-making ability, problem solving, critical thinking…etc…” is relevant or irrelevant in engineer’s resume?

          It all depends on your work experience. If you have 2+ years of experience, it would be better to emphasize that over your personality traits. Good luck!

          Excellent advice here. Thanks for sharing it! Question: Is it ok to break from chronologically listing ones employment history to emphasize related experience? My concern being that if I don’t capture the readers interest within a few seconds, they might dismiss my resume before getting to relevant experience. Example: In 2008, after 18 years in the insurance industry I left (I was a home office executive for a global company). After leaving, I spent 2 years traveling around 28 countries. Since returning to the USA 4 years ago, I’ve held basic blue collar jobs – just because they interested me, and I’ve had fun. So, I’m looking to get back into the insurance industry, and while I’ve a long list of accomplishments and experience, it’s 7 years ago. I’d really appreciate your advice on what I can do to not be too unorthodox in my resume structure, yet get the readers attention from the get go. Thank you for your time! Regards.

          A functional resume format is great for masking work gaps. Check out our functional format guide here: https://resumegenius.com/resume-formats/functional-samples-writing-guide

          Good luck on the job hunt!

          Are these resume’s ATS friendly? I know it’s mentioned these are “battle-tested Professional Profile templates” – what the hell is battle tested? What battles are you testing? Are you testing against ATS, in addition to HR?

          Yes, these resumes are ATS friendly. Battle tested just means they’ve proven to be reliably successful.

          if that experience is relevant to the job you are applying for, then it is certainly a good idea. Best of luck!

          Focus on the experience that is directly relevant to the job you are applying for. In your professional profile, you could start with “# years of administrative experience in….” Best of luck!

          Resume Genius

          The World's Smartest Resume Builder

          header-right

          Main navigation

          • Resume Genius Resume Genius

          Resume Builder

          Introducing the world’s smartest resume builder. Choose from thousands of industry-specific bullet points and write a professional application in minutes. It’s free!

        • Why Use Resume Genius?

          Our state-of-the-art online resume maker software makes writing one completely stress free and faster than ever before. Read why you should try our resume builder today.

        • RG Reviews & Testimonials

          We’ve helped millions of people find employment with our resume builder. See what happy employment seekers are saying about our builder.

        • Learn about the experts, career gurus, and software wizards at RG. See why our resume builder is the best of its kind of the web.

          Resume Samples

          Need inspiration? Our samples give perfect guidelines for you to follow to make the best application for your industry. Use our writing guides to land more interviews, faster.

          Resume Templates

          We have several HR-approved template styles that are good for all types of employment seekers. We’ve separated them out into different categories to help you choose faster. They are free to download.

        • Basic Templates

          These templates are minimalist, yet highly effective. If you want to play it safe with a battle-tested template, this choice is for you. medical writing courses These templates are straight from our resume builder.

        • Career Objective Templates

          Hiring managers love to see the critical information they’re looking for at the top of your resume. Use these templates to make sure you’re putting your best foot forward right away.

        • Professional Profile Templates

          The professional profile introduction is rapidly becoming a favorite of hiring managers. Browse our professional profile template library and find one that suits your taste.

            How to Write a Resume

            Don’t know the basics? Learn from this comprehensive guide. Leave questions in the comments and we’ll respond within a day.

          • Resume Fonts, Margins, & Paper Selection Guidelines

            Your template’s looks shouldn’t be important, but it is. Learn how to make a beautiful template that will leave hiring managers saying, “wow!”

            Downloadable Cover Letter Examples

            Browse through our library of industry-specific cover letter samples. Get inspiration on how to create a cover letter that fits your career path. Download the ones you like and simply add your own information.

          • How to Write Your Cover Letter

            Use our cover letter writing guide to learn how to format it for applicant tracking systems. Don’t forget to download our cover letter checklist to discover what you might be missing.

          • Cover Letter Builder

            Create a convincing cover letter in minutes with our state of the art software. Our builder knows exactly which template you need to use based off of your work and personal life situation, then you just fill in the blanks.

          • How to Write a Thank You Note

            Writing an artful thank you note can help you make a lasting impression, or even help you recover from a bad interview. Learn our best tips and tricks inside.

              The Longest Action Verb List in the Universe

              Action verbs give your resume “oomph.” Use our ‘longest action verb list in history’ to give yourself a boost.

            • Resignation Letter Samples & Templates

              Browse our database of free resignation letter sample and templates. To write the best resignation letter possible, customize our templates, or use our tips to write your own.

            • Common Interview Questions & Answers

              Just how should you answer those confounding interview questions? We constantly update this list of common interview questions and answers to ensure you’re as prepared as possible.

              How to Write a Resume

              By Resume Genius

              Let’s face it. Writing a resume is a daunting task. While the resources providing writing tips are many, few actually provide a step by step process on how to write one. However if you want to write it on your own, we commend your courage and are here to guide you through the process.

              Free downloadable resume templates, HR-approved.

              Resume samples and guides written by professionals.

              Learn which resume format you should use.

              Browse through our cover letter examples

              Table of Contents

              First, let’s review what a resume isn’t.

              Think of your resume this way: It’s an advertisement, and YOU are the product. Your goal is to get hiring managers to buy into what you’re selling – which means giving you an interview. To accomplish that, you need to see it as your marketing tool, your trusty belt buckle of tricks. Without it you are powerless. However, simply having a one isn’t enough to get you an interview.

              When you finish with your resume, don’t forget to write a matching cover letter. Download one of our cover letter templates and get started.

              Think about it — everyone has advertisements. Why should anyone buy into yours? Hiring managers have the difficult task of wading through the ads to find the right fit for their company.

              Much like the flashing neon signs along the Vegas Strip, hiring managers are attracted to well-formatted resumes with attention-grabbing details. where to publish a book Studies show that, “8 out of 10 resumes are discarded with only a 10 second glance.” So in order stand out from the crowd it’s important that yours markets your skills in a way that demonstrates that you can successfully perform the duties of the job.

              “A guiding principle of the résumé writing profession is that there are no hard and fast rules.”

              To help you do this, we’ve written easy-to-follow steps on how to write a resume. Before we get into the steps it should be noted that there is no certified way to write one. There are some who insist otherwise, but even certified professional resume writers will admit that, “a guiding principle of the résumé writing profession is that there are no hard and fast rules.” With that being said, below are some tips and guidelines to help you write one that best presents your career goals.

              Step 1: Choose From 3 Formats

              So you are staring at a blank page on your computer wondering, “Where do I start?” Hundreds ask this same question every day and the reason is most likely due to the fact that there is no standard rule for formatting a resume.

              Your formatting decision comes down to 3 choices: Reverse-Chronological, Functional, and Combination. Each format has their own advantages and disadvantages. Below, you will find which one is best for you.

              I. Reverse-Chronological

              This is the more traditional format and is what you are most likely to come across. Chronological format is flexible and can be used for applicants with any level of experience.

              I should use if:

              • I want to show a vertical career progression.
              • I want to apply to a job in a similar field.
              • I want to promote my upward career mobility

              I shouldn’t use if:

              • I have major gaps in my employment history.
              • I am changing my career path.
              • I change jobs every few months.

              II. Functional

              While chronological places emphasis on career progression, a functional format focuses on your abilities and skills. Since it heavily emphasizes the applicant’s qualifications, functional format is more suitable for those with an expert level of experience.

              I should use if:

              • I have gaps in my employment history.
              • I am changing my career industry.
              • I want to highlight a specific skill set.

              I shouldn’t use if:

              • I want to highlight my upward career mobility.
              • I am an entry level candidate that lacks experience.
              • I lack transferable skills

              III. Combination

              As you can probably guess the combination format merges bits and pieces from both chronological and functional formats. Like the functional format, it focuses on specific qualifications, yet the body of the document contains professional experience similar to chronological format. This format is generally reserved for those with a great deal of experience in a particular industry.

              I should use if:

              • I want to highlight a developed skill set within a specific career.
              • I want to change my career path.
              • I am a master of the subject I am applying to.

              I shouldn’t use if:

              • I want to highlight my education.
              • I lack experience.
              • I am an entry level candidate.

              If you are still not sure what format is best for you, then check out our in-depth resume format guide.

              Step 2: The Order of Information

              Before delving into what information you should add, it’s important to remember that the information you include will largely depend on the format you choose. With that being said, below is a general guide to what information you should add and the order in which you should add it.

              I. Contact Information

              The contact information section is pretty self-explanatory. This section does not require a label (Contact Information or Contact Details). When listing your contact details you should follow this order:

              • Name (largest font on page, middle initial is optional)
              • Mailing Address
              • Telephone Number (Check that you have an appropriate voicemail message)
              • Email Address (make sure it’s appropriate, don’t use your sexypanda45@gmail.com account.)
              • Link to online portfolio (optional, ensure it is relevant to the position)
              • LinkedIn Profile

              Here are 3 different examples of how you can format your contact information section (pay attention to the yellow highlights):

              Professional Format

              Classic Format

              Executive Format

              Also, be careful not to accidentally add the contact information in the header as applicant tracking systems may not be able to read it.

              II. Choose a Resume Introduction

              Like formats, job seekers have 3 choices for their resume introduction: a qualifications summary, career objective, and professional profile. The goal of all three are to gain the attention of an employer by highlighting your skills and experience that will help their company. However, the method through which each introduction achieves this goal differs. See below:

              Qualifications Summary

              With regards to format, the qualifications summary is a bullet point list (ranging from 4 to 6 points) of your most outstanding career achievements. Avoid using generic statements and try to list your skills in a way reflects your unique voice.

              I should use if:

              • I am applying to a job that requires a rigid set of abilities.
              • I have a wealth of experience in the industry.
              • I possess multiple skill sets.

              I shouldn’t use if:

              • I lack experience.
              • I am an entry level candidate that lacks specific skill sets.
              • I lack measurable achievements.

              Career Objective

              A resume objective, also referred to as a career objective, is a 2-3 sentence statement that provides an overview of your skills and experience. This resume introduction is best for entry-level candidates.

              I should use if:

              • I am an entry-level applicant.
              • I do not have in-depth experience in the industry.
              • I am a recent college graduate.

              I shouldn’t use if:

              • I have a wealth of industry-specific skill sets.
              • I am changing career paths.
              • I am writing a cover letter.

              Professional Profile

              The professional profile is a combination of both the career objective and qualifications summary. It is also the most flexible of the three styles as it can be formatted as short paragraph of bullet-point list.

              I should use if:

              • I have had major achievement in my past experience
              • I am applying to a position in the same industry
              • I have a special area of expertise in my field

              I shouldn’t use if:

              • I am an entry-level applicant
              • I am recent college graduate
              • I lack measurable of accomplishments

              Finally, when deciding what skills to add to either of the two, try to target skills specific to the job you are applying for. Don’t just simply copy and paste skills right out of the job description, but instead try to use words common in the industry.

              III. Professional Experience

              The section is the core of your resume, where you are tasked with proving the skills you have listed in the qualifications summary or career objective. When it comes to labeling this section some use “Relevant Experience,” or “Work Experience” as an alternative to “Professional Experience.”

              Remember to list your work experiences in reverse chronological order and only list experience that is relevant to the job you are applying for. For each company create a heading including the company’s name, city & state, your title, and the dates of employment (month and year). If you are still currently working at a company, you can simply write “month, year-Present” for the employment dates.

              A general rule is that each experience have around 3-5 bullet points of your main duties and achievements.

              3 Parts of a strong bullet point:

              • 1 st : Action Verb (should always be first)
              • 2 nd : Quantifiable Point
              • 3 rd : Specific and relevant job duty

              Trained 5+ cashiers , managing their cash limits and guaranteeing quality customer service at all times.

              Example #2:(Note that the Quantifiable Point does not need to come immediately after the action verb)

              Spearheaded the development of the first media kit amalgamation for all company projects , increasing national sales by 8%.

              The above bullet points are great examples because they use action verbs to help to snatch the attention of hiring managers. Here is an endless list of action verbs to help get some inspiration. When writing your past experiences don’t forget to write your action verbs in past tense.

              Adding a quantifiable or measurable point to each experience will give the hiring manager confidence in your abilities.In addition each of your job duties should be specific and listed by decreasing importance.

              IV. Education

              Having a solid education section helps to display the foundation of your knowledge and expertise. Depending on your professional experience, you may want to consider switching the order of the professional experience and education sections.

              For instance, college or high school students that lack seasoned professional experience benefit from emphasizing their education by placing it before the professional experience section. blog writing service In addition, if you possess a wealth of professional experience then it is appropriate to keep this section short and sweet.

              Here are the main points to include in your education section:

              • The names of your university, community college, or technical school(Don’t include high school unless you did not attend college)
              • Location of the schools (city, state)
              • Date of graduation (month, year)
              • Degree(s)
              • GPA (only include if your GPA is above 3.0, round up to the first decimal place , and use this format: GPA: 3.5/4.0)

              Here are three examples of how you can format an education section (pay attention to the yellow highlighted areas):

              Education Sample 1- High School Graduate

              Education Sample 2- Community College

              Education Sample 3- University Graduate

              Resume Genius

              The World's Smartest Resume Builder

              header-right

              Main navigation

              • Resume Genius Resume Genius

              Resume Builder

              Introducing the world’s smartest resume builder. Choose from thousands of industry-specific bullet points and write a professional application in minutes. It’s free!

            • Why Use Resume Genius?

              Our state-of-the-art online resume maker software makes writing one completely stress free and faster than ever before. Read why you should try our resume builder today.

            • RG Reviews & Testimonials

              We’ve helped millions of people find employment with our resume builder. See what happy employment seekers are saying about our builder.

            • Learn about the experts, career gurus, and software wizards at RG. See why our resume builder is the best of its kind of the web.

              Resume Samples

              Need inspiration? Our samples give perfect guidelines for you to follow to make the best application for your industry. Use our writing guides to land more interviews, faster.

              Resume Templates

              We have several HR-approved template styles that are good for all types of employment seekers. We’ve separated them out into different categories to help you choose faster. They are free to download.

            • Basic Templates

              These templates are minimalist, yet highly effective. If you want to play it safe with a battle-tested template, this choice is for you. These templates are straight from our resume builder.

            • Career Objective Templates

              Hiring managers love to see the critical information they’re looking for at the top of your resume. Use these templates to make sure you’re putting your best foot forward right away.

            • Professional Profile Templates

              The professional profile introduction is rapidly becoming a favorite of hiring managers. Browse our professional profile template library and find one that suits your taste.

                How to Write a Resume

                Don’t know the basics? Learn from this comprehensive guide. Leave questions in the comments and we’ll respond within a day.

              • Resume Fonts, Margins, & Paper Selection Guidelines

                Your template’s looks shouldn’t be important, but it is. Learn how to make a beautiful template that will leave hiring managers saying, “wow!”

                Downloadable Cover Letter Examples

                Browse through our library of industry-specific cover letter samples. Get inspiration on how to create a cover letter that fits your career path. Download the ones you like and simply add your own information.

              • How to Write Your Cover Letter

                Use our cover letter writing guide to learn how to format it for applicant tracking systems. Don’t forget to download our cover letter checklist to discover what you might be missing.

              • Cover Letter Builder

                Create a convincing cover letter in minutes with our state of the art software. Our builder knows exactly which template you need to use based off of your work and personal life situation, then you just fill in the blanks.

              • How to Write a Thank You Note

                Writing an artful thank you note can help you make a lasting impression, or even help you recover from a bad interview. Learn our best tips and tricks inside.

                  The Longest Action Verb List in the Universe

                  Action verbs give your resume “oomph.” Use our ‘longest action verb list in history’ to give yourself a boost.

                • Resignation Letter Samples & Templates

                  Browse our database of free resignation letter sample and templates. To write the best resignation letter possible, customize our templates, or use our tips to write your own.

                • Common Interview Questions & Answers

                  Just how should you answer those confounding interview questions? We constantly update this list of common interview questions and answers to ensure you’re as prepared as possible.

                  How To Write a Professional Profile

                  By Erik Episcopo

                  Want to add some “oomph” to your resume? Try adding a professional profile.

                  Adding a profile to your resume is like putting an elevator in a ten-story building. It can help get the hiring manager to exactly where they want to go in a hurry. It enhances the readability of your resume, thus making it hiring manager-friendly.

                  What is a Professional Profile?

                  Sometimes referred to as a professional summary, a profile is a detailed synopsis of your skills and expertise. Depending on your preference, it can be written in paragraph form or a bullet point list.

                  Consider these two styles for your profile:

                  Profile in Bullet Form

                  Profile in Paragraph Form

                  We know what you are thinking, “Well, what’s the difference between the qualifications summary, career objective, and professional profile?”

                  What is the difference between a Career Objective, Qualifications Summary, and Professional Profile?

                  The beginning of your resume is essentially the “elevator speech” through which you introduce yourself to the hiring manager.

                  This is the million-dollar question. The beginning of your resume is essentially the “elevator speech” through which you introduce yourself to the hiring manager.

                  All three styles have the same purpose—to grab the attention of the hiring manager by highlighting your qualifications that are relevant to the position. However the method by which they deliver this information differs slightly.

                  Elements of a career objective

                  • Position-centered
                  • Customized to a specific job description
                  • Often styled as a statement of 2-3 sentences

                  Compare a career objective and professional profile below:

                  Laborer with Career Objective

                  Laborer Professional Profile

                  Elements of a qualifications summary

                  • Focuses more on your career achievements
                  • Consists of 5-6 bullet points that showcase your most impressive accomplishments
                  • Applicant-tracking system friendly because it targets specific keywords related to the job

                  Compare the qualifications summary and a professional profile below:

                  Janitor Qualifications Summary

                  Janitor Professional Profile

                  Elements of a professional profile:

                  • A mix of both a career objective and qualifications summary
                  • Can be styled as either a paragraph or bullet point list
                  • Since they are not necessarily targeting a specific position, professional profiles are great when uploading your resume to job search sites and networking resumes

                  Not sure how to choose between the three above? Then use our “Resume Introduction” Flow Chart.

                  The profile is a bit more structured than the career objective or qualifications summary as it focuses on four key points.

                  The Four Points of a Professional Profile

                  Depending on how much experience you have, your profile can include an additional point. With that being said, we recommend not going over five points in your professional profile as you risk losing the attention of the hiring manager. To maintain readability, try aiming for 500 hundred characters or less as a rule of thumb.

                  Point #1: Years of Experience or Education

                  Leading your resume profile with your experience will garner the attention of the hiring manager and prove your ability to satisfy the duties of the position.

                  You should begin with a statement declaring your years of experience in a particular position. Leading with your experience will garner the attention of the hiring manager and prove your ability to satisfy the duties of the position. Make sure to include your job title.

                  Here is an example of how your first point might look like for an accountant:

                  • “A certified public accountant with 5+ years of experience in ledger processes and account reconciliations.”

                  Here’s how the first point of a recent graduate might sound like:

                  • “A recent graduate of the School of Accounting at James Madison University, with in-depth knowledge in corporate financing and operational accounting.”

                  Point #2: Specialty Area of Experience

                  The next point should mention a particular specialty within the industry that you possess. This will prove that you are an expert in your field. If you can’t think of a specialty, consider adding a job duty that you feel you excel at.

                  Here’s an example:

                  • “An expert at performing large enterprise audits of $100 million.”

                  Notice how the point above quantifies their specialty to help give their point more weight and further attract the hiring manager.

                  Try to add measurable or quantifiable points to your resume profile whenever possible.

                  Point #3: The Skills That Pay the Bills

                  In your third point, you should showcase your skills that you will be able to contribute to the specific job. Do research on the skills your industry values the most and add those that you possess. If you are changing your career path, consider skills that might transfer into your new career prospects. Also, if you have any certifications or licenses pertinent to your industry be sure to add them here.

                  Check out this example from our accountant:

                  • “Possess comprehensive knowledge of database software, and strong oral communication in English and Spanish.”

                  Point #4: Achievements

                  Stating that you received 1st place at the state fair for the hot dog eating contest won’t impress an employer looking for an accountant.

                  Your final point should stress your career achievements. Remember that relevance is the key. books on writing books Stating that you received 1st place at the state fair for the hot dog eating contest won’t impress an employer looking for an accountant. Instead, add achievements that are applicable to the industry. If you have multiple achievements feel free to add a 5th point to your profile.

                  Here’s what our accountant added:

                  • “Corrected errors within our annual budget analysis which lead to a 15% reduction of costs.”

                  Add a Professional Profile to your LinkedIn Page

                  Just like with your resume, your LinkedIn page should also include an “elevator speech” to help employers navigate through your experience. A LinkedIn summary provides an employer with a quick introduction that highlights your achievements and expertise.

                  Adding a well written profile to your LinkedIn page gives you a stronger online presence and increase your likelihood of getting noticed by HR.

                  The rules are generally the same as the resume profile guidelines above, but there are a few specific tips to consider when structuring your LinkedIn profile:

                  • Target a specific audience
                  • Make it scannable/Break it up with headings
                  • Focus on quantifying your accomplishments
                  • Fill up the entire section
                  • Add graphics

                  The debate on how to begin your resume will continue to rage on, but we hope these tips drown out the noise and allow you to make the right decision. Adding these four points to your professional profile will create an effective and enticing introduction to your resume.

                  Looking for a Great Professional Profile Resume Template?

                  Check out our gallery of HR-approved, battle-tested Professional Profile templates. They are free to download, and will help you land interviews faster:

                  If you have any questions, feel free to comment below.

                  As always, great advice! Thanks for sharing!

                  Thanks Nina! Feel free to share our advice!

                  awesome guide! I have a question: I tried to have everything on one page and I think I managed, with joining some bullet points, but I couldn’t find extra space for “interpersonal skills”. I am thinking about removing this point from resume. Please advice if “decision-making ability, problem solving, critical thinking…etc…” is relevant or irrelevant in engineer’s resume?

                  It all depends on your work experience. If you have 2+ years of experience, it would be better to emphasize that over your personality traits. Good luck!

                  Excellent advice here. Thanks for sharing it! Question: Is it ok to break from chronologically listing ones employment history to emphasize related experience? My concern being that if I don’t capture the readers interest within a few seconds, they might dismiss my resume before getting to relevant experience. Example: In 2008, after 18 years in the insurance industry I left (I was a home office executive for a global company). After leaving, I spent 2 years traveling around 28 countries. Since returning to the USA 4 years ago, I’ve held basic blue collar jobs – just because they interested me, and I’ve had fun. So, I’m looking to get back into the insurance industry, and while I’ve a long list of accomplishments and experience, it’s 7 years ago. I’d really appreciate your advice on what I can do to not be too unorthodox in my resume structure, yet get the readers attention from the get go. Thank you for your time! Regards.

                  A functional resume format is great for masking work gaps. Check out our functional format guide here: https://resumegenius.com/resume-formats/functional-samples-writing-guide

                  Good luck on the job hunt!

                  Are these resume’s ATS friendly? I know it’s mentioned these are “battle-tested Professional Profile templates” – what the hell is battle tested? What battles are you testing? Are you testing against ATS, in addition to HR?

                  Yes, these resumes are ATS friendly. Battle tested just means they’ve proven to be reliably successful.

                  if that experience is relevant to the job you are applying for, then it is certainly a good idea. Best of luck!

                  Focus on the experience that is directly relevant to the job you are applying for. In your professional profile, you could start with “# years of administrative experience in….” Best of luck!

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