Writing for dummies – where can i write my essay online

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Creative Writing For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Do you want to be the next J.K. Rowling and dream up a character like Harry Potter? Do you want to write poems or plays? Follow this handy Cheat Sheet, which breaks down the process into manageable tasks, and helps you to develop your style.

Before You Begin Your Creative Writing

Always be prepared! Here’s a checklist of useful writing aids to have with you as you begin to write – just don’t forget the chocolate biscuits.

A good notebook

Plenty of paper

A computer or laptop

A desk or other writing space

How to Generate Creative Writing Ideas

Writer’s block affects all writers from time to time. If you feel a bit stuck for inspiration, try these techniques to get your creative juices flowing.

Find a postcard, photograph or painting depicting two or more people and write a story about them.

Look at any object and write about it – where does it come from, who does it belong to, who might want it?

Read the newspaper for unusual and interesting stories and develop them as fiction.

Listen to conversations on the bus, in a café or at the supermarket. Jot them down and carry them on, seeing where they lead you.

Pick up a book you really like and open it at a random page. Pick a sentence you like and write it down, and then carry on writing your own story.

Pick an emotion and create a story around it. Pick another, and carry on writing. Make the characters move from the first emotion to the second.

Writing Your First Draft

Writing a first draft of your creative writing project – whether a novel, short story, poem or play – can be a bit daunting. Follow these handy hints to help you organise your thoughts and manage your time:

Don’t worry about a great opening line yet. Simply start writing wherever you like.

Keep the flow going in the early stages – keep writing without stopping, going back, re-reading or changing what you’ve written.

Remember to show not tell – think about how to dramatise what you’re writing about and create visual images.

Start somewhere else and get going again if you become stuck on a particular passage.

Rewriting and Editing Your Creative Writing Project

Rewriting and editing helps to tighten up your work. But it can be difficult – what to chop and when to stop may not be clear, and you may change your mind more than once during the process. Ask yourself whether you need to take out:

Unnecessary information and explanation.

Passages of dialogue that go on too long.

Clunky descriptions that give too much detail.

Clumsy images that don’t really work.

Too many adjectives and adverbs.

You may need to add or expand:

Something you know but have forgotten to tell the reader; perhaps the age of the main character.

More specific descriptive information that shows instead of tells; instead of describing a man as ‘old’, describe his white hair, slow gait and mottled hands.

Dialogue of what the characters actually say, rather than summaries.

Material to add interest or create suspense.

A better opening or closing line.

You may need to move:

Dramatic sections to make a stronger opening.

Early information to where the reader really needs to know it.

Essential information nearer the beginning of the book.

Descriptive passages to add tension and suspense to incidents.

Words, phrases and sentences to make a better rhythm.

In your final edit:

Check for grammar, punctuation and spelling mistakes.

Ensure you have no continuity errors.

Pay particular attention to the first and last lines of any section or scene.

Smooth out any awkward words and phrases.

Clarify anything that isn’t clear.

Ways to Develop and Improve Your Creative Writing

Here are some top tips for developing your creative writing. No writing is ever a finished product – there are always ways to improve and refine your style.

Go on a writing course.

Join a writers’ circle.

Find a good library and use it.

Read and re-read good writing.

Attend book festivals, readings and bookshop events.

Creative Writing for Dummies

by Maggie Hamand

Chapter 1: Can Everyone Write? Chapter 2: Getting into the Write Mind Chapter 3: Finding the Material to work with Part II: The Elements of Creative Writing

Chapter 4: Creating Characters Chapter 5: Discovering Dialogue Chapter 6: Who is telling the story? Chapter 7: Creating your own world Chapter 8: Plotting your way Chapter 9: Creating a Structure Chapter 10: Rewriting and editing Part III: Different Kinds of Fiction Writing

Chapter 11: Short stories Chapter 12: Novels Chapter 13: Writing for children Chapter 14: Plays Chapter 15: Screenplays Chapter 16: Poetry Part IV: Different kinds of Non-fiction writing

Chapter 17: Breaking into journalism – Writing articles/ magazine writing Chapter 18: Writing from life and autobiography Chapter 19: Embroidering the facts: Narrative non-fiction Chapter 20: Exploring the world from your armchair – Travel writing Chapter 21: Blogging – the new big thing Part V: Finding an audience

Chapter 22: Finding editors/ publishers/ agents Chapter 23: Becoming a professional Part VI: Part of Tens

Chapter 24: Ten top tips for writers Chapter 25: Ten ways to get noticed Less

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Creative Writing for Dummies

by Maggie Hamand

Chapter 1: Can Everyone Write? Chapter 2: Getting into the Write Mind Chapter 3: Finding the Material to work with Part II: The Elements of Creative Writing

Chapter 4: Creating Characters Chapter 5: Discovering Dialogue Chapter 6: Who is telling the story? Chapter 7: Creating your own world Chapter 8: Plotting your way Chapter 9: Creating a Structure Chapter 10: Rewriting and editing Part III: Different Kinds of Fiction Writing

Chapter 11: Short stories Chapter 12: Novels Chapter 13: Writing for children Chapter 14: Plays Chapter 15: Screenplays Chapter 16: Poetry Part IV: Different kinds of Non-fiction writing

Chapter 17: Breaking into journalism – Writing articles/ magazine writing Chapter 18: Writing from life and autobiography Chapter 19: Embroidering the facts: Narrative non-fiction Chapter 20: Exploring the world from your armchair – Travel writing Chapter 21: Blogging – the new big thing Part V: Finding an audience

Chapter 22: Finding editors/ publishers/ agents Chapter 23: Becoming a professional Part VI: Part of Tens

Chapter 24: Ten top tips for writers Chapter 25: Ten ways to get noticed Less

Get a copy

Friends’ Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up .

Creative ​Writing For Dummies 0 csillagozás

Develop ​the writing know–how that will keep your readers hooked Do you have an idea for a novel (or a poem, or an article, or a play) that you′d love to finally get down on paper? Whatever your aim, inside you′ll find the advice and support to get you started and keep you going. From preparing a writing work–space to marshalling your material into both fiction and non–fiction genres, Creative Writing For Dummies has everything you need to help you unlock your creativity and make your writing sparkle. So, you want to be a writer – pick and choose between genres, gather the materials you need and develop the right routines He said what? When? – discover how to fit character, voice, dialogue and plot together Telling tales – differentiate between novels, novellas and short stories, write plays for the stage or screen, wax lyrical in poetry or dip into children′s writing Matters of fact – blog about anything and everything, break into journalism, and let life stories, narrative… (tovább)

Develop ​the writing know–how that will keep your readers hooked Do you have an idea for a novel (or a poem, or an article, or a play) that you′d love to finally get down on paper? Whatever your aim, inside you′ll find the advice and support to get you started and keep you going. From preparing a writing work–space to marshalling your material into both fiction and non–fiction genres, Creative Writing For Dummies has everything you need to help you unlock your creativity and make your writing sparkle. So, you want to be a writer – pick and choose between genres, gather the materials you need and develop the right routines He said what? When? – discover how to fit character, voice, dialogue and plot together Telling tales – differentiate between novels, novellas and short stories, write plays for the stage or screen, wax lyrical in poetry or dip into children′s writing Matters of fact – blog about anything and everything, break into journalism, and let life stories, narrative non–fiction and travel writing leap off the page From pastime to profession – crack the world of publishing and go professional with your hobby „Learn from one of the best editors and teachers in the business. She pushed my writing to award–winning status.” – Dreda Say Mitchell , author of Running Hot , winner of the CWA John Creasey Dagger Award in 2005. scholarship for college Open the book and find: Exactly where your writing talents lie Why you need to be a good reader to become a good writer What turns words on a page into sparkling conversation Ways to weave character, plot and structure together All the different sub–genres of novel–writing – from thrillers to chick–lit The secrets of successful blogging Editing tips that all writers can benefit from The inner workings of agencies and publishing houses

Writing Fiction for Dummies

This book summarizes just about everything I’ve ever taught about writing fiction in one handy reference. I wrote the book especially for new writers, but I’m pretty sure that even multipublished authors will learn a number of new tricks.

List price: $20 (But nobody pays list price, right?)

Description

I’m Randy Ingermanson, publisher of the Advanced Fiction Writing E-zine, the world’s largest-circulation electronic newsletter on how to write fiction. I’m known around the world as “the Snowflake Guy” in honor of my “Snowflake method” of designing a novel. And I’ve got a thick book out, Writing Fiction For Dummies, that brings together just about all the things I’ve been teaching for the last 17 years on fiction writing.

About Writing Fiction For Dummies

  • Getting Your Head in the Game. scholarships for nursing Learn where you are on the roadmap to publication and what tactics you need to execute right now to move on to that pesky “next level.”
  • Choosing Your Category. If you get this wrong, you might wreck your chances of publishing your novel.
  • Finding Your Creative Paradigm. Different writers are different. Do you know YOUR best way to create that crucial first draft?
  • Managing Your Time … And Yourself. Practical tips to help you find the time to write your Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius.
  • Creating Your Story World. Learn about “cultural drivers,” the “backdrop of conflict,” and the all-important “story question.”
  • Understanding Character Motivation and Point of View. Do you know what ONE THING your lead character must have before you have a story?
  • Developing Your Storyline. A storyline may be your most effective selling tool. We give examples of the storylines of 20 best-selling novels, each taken apart so you can see how it works.
  • Defining Your Three-Act Structure. Learn the simple five-part formula for spelling out your Three-Act Structure to help you succinctly explain your story to publishing professionals.
  • Writing Your Synopsis. Many novelists hate writing that dreaded synopsis. We’ll show you a simple principle that guides you in writing a synopsis that tells neither too little nor too much.
  • Lining Up Your Scenes. Scenes are the fundamental units of fiction. We teach you how to organize them so they work together, and how to structure each one so that it creates the powerful emotional experience your reader craves.
  • Writing Action, Dialogue, and More. Learn how to piece together a scene using the seven basic building blocks — action, dialogue, and all the rest. Are you using all seven as well as you can?
  • Letting Your Theme Emerge. Techniques for finding your theme without letting it strangle your story.
  • Analyzing Your Characters. After your first draft is written, learn the first thing you need to do before you edit a single sentence — and why.
  • Revising Your Story Structure. Discover the three levels of story analysis that will pay you big dividends when you start making revisions.
  • Editing Your Scene Structure. Do you know when to fix a scene, when to leave it alone, and … when to kill it?
  • Polishing Your Scenes. Learn how to decide when to “show,” when to “tell,” when those much-maligned flashbacks actually make sense, and how to edit your scenes line by line to make your story MOVE — and move your reader.
  • Queries and Proposals. Learn the fundamentals of a good query letter and a solid proposal — and how to know which you need.
  • Agents and Editors. Finding an agent to represent you and an editor to champion your novel at a publisher.
  • Ten Steps To Analyzing Your Story. A time-tested method to help you design your story before you write it and analyze it after you do.
  • Ten Reasons Novels Are Rejected. Can you guess all ten?

Some Places to Buy Writing Fiction for Dummies Online

Here are some of the usual suspects:

SEO Writing For Dummies – Please Read

SEO Writing for Dummies

An important tool in a freelance writer’s arsenal is search engine optimization, also called SEO. In this piece, we’ll answer key questions like “What is SEO content writing?” and “How can it help a client’s website?” Understanding how to write SEO content is key to your success as a freelance writer, so learn some of these helpful tips and tricks so that you can produce great work.

What is SEO Writing?

SEO writing is a form of writing that helps websites become more visible to major search engines like Google and Bing. A highly visible website with good content appears on the first few pages of results when someone searches for that topic. Those websites, in turn, get a tremendous boost in traffic from search engine users. That makes writing for SEO very worthwhile for websites seeking an audience. SEO content-writing jobs are increasingly in demand, so having an understanding of what exactly the job entails means you will be a more valuable asset to any company that hires you.

What Are Keyword Phrases?

Keywords are identical to the search phrases people type in when they are looking for information on the Internet. For example, if a reader wants to learn about guinea pigs, they will probably go to a search engine and type exactly that: guinea pigs. Thus, using the keyword phrase “guinea pigs” within an article allows the search engine know the article can help people learn about guinea pigs.

Due to the way search engines read pages, SEO writers should use keyword phrases exactly the way they appear in article instructions. If the instructions call for the phrase “guinea pigs,” to be most effective, you should include the phrase as a whole.

For editing purposes, Online Writing Jobs instructions typically ask our writers to signify the use of keywords with parentheses. For example:

There are many different types of pets. (Guinea pigs) are among the most popular because they are easy to care for and can be a great pet for younger children.

What if a Keyword Phrase Doesn’t Sound Natural?

Sometimes, you will get an article that calls for a keyword phrase totally unlike what you would use in everyday speech. That’s because people tend to type into Google whatever comes to their mind first, often in its most simplistic form. scholarships for women over 40 For example, someone looking for a divorce lawyer in Springfield will simply type “divorce lawyers Springfield.”

Since articles must sound natural and engaging, this can make writing for SEO a challenge.

However, there’s a plus side, as there are several different ways to handle a confusing keyword phrase like this. The first way is to separate the phrase with punctuation, as it’s been revealed that major search engines like Google don’t take into account most punctuation, with rare exceptions. So a few perfectly acceptable ways to address this issue are as follows:

If you’re comparing (divorce lawyers, Springfield) has many options.

At our law firm, you will find only the most reliable and compassionate (divorce lawyers. Springfield) residents have trusted us for more than 40 years.

This first method is the most classic way to handle keywords and what most writers think of when asked, “What is SEO writing?” But there’s also a newer way to handle odd keywords like these. There are short words and phrases that are often ignored by search engines. Prepositions and articles (i.e. words like “of,” “a,” “in,” and “on”) are often completely ignored. This can turn a bad keyword into one that’s more natural:

Her experience and expertise make her one of the best (divorce lawyers in Springfield).

Those keywords are often called “stop words.” A writer should not use them excessively in title tags, as they take up too much important real estate in your very short title, but within page content, this is perfectly fine.

Regardless of which method you use, your keywords must always fit naturally into the text of the article. Unnatural-sounding keywords with poor grammar will be very recognizable to more evolved search engines over time.

How Many Keywords Should I Use?

In simplistic terms: a lot, but not too many! Use as many keywords as you can while still sounding natural. While you want your keywords to appear in your content, you don’t want them to be stuffed in there awkwardly and too many times. This is called “over-optimizing” and can actually hurt a website’s rankings. A rule of thumb could be that in a piece that’s around 300-400 words, you should aim for 5-7 keyword phrases and never introduce keywords more than 10 times.

Tips for Better SEO Writing

  • Write for the audience: While reading your article, the average person should have no idea that keywords were involved. Your tone may vary according to the article assignment but should always be informative, engaging, and centered on the needs of the reader.
  • Read your article out loud: If you read your article out loud before submitting it, you might find places where the language doesn’t sound quite as clean as it should.
  • Insert keywords before or after writing: Before you start writing SEO content, look at the style and the keyword list. Can you use any of the keywords in major headers or within opening sentences? These may be some of the more natural and easiest places to put your keyword phrases, and you can do it right away. Likewise, you might find it helpful to insert keywords after your first draft is done. Making small changes to sentences you already wrote can help them accommodate keywords easily and relieves you of the extra concern for keyword phrases before your first draft is done. Try to find a method that works best for you.
  • Use a checklist: In addition to keeping the article instructions open in a separate window, you might find it helpful to copy and paste the keywords into a Word file where you can mark them as you go and make notes showing how many times you’ve used each one. Likewise, bolding the keywords as you spread them through the article will help you see them at a glance. (Just don’t forget to unbold the keywords before you submit the article!)

Where to Find Out More

You’ve now gained further knowledge about what SEO writing is and how it can help your clients. If you have a question about SEO writing, feel free to contact us: Online Writing Jobs is a longtime provider of high-quality SEO content. If you currently write with us, feel free to send our staff an email, check out some more in-depth material to help you improve your writing, or look up more information in our Writer Resources.

If you’re not yet a writer with us, take a stab at it! Apply as a writer today!

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Contract Writing For Dummies

Contract Writing For Dummies

Hi there! It looks like you’re new here. Get this free guide to find out how to protect your company: 7 Ways to Protect Your Company from Contracts That Aren’t Binding.

Writing a contract and agreeing to it can be one of the biggest challenges of your working relationship with a client. The contract has to reflect exactly what it is you both expect as an outcome from your relationship.

Agreeing on a contract with a client is almost as important as choosing the right partner to marry. statistic help for students If you don’t get it right, you could end up in court and out of pocket – the result being a lost client and a damaged ego. So getting the contract, spot on, to reflect your two-way relationship, as well as the expectations and outcomes, is vital.

I’ve done contract writing the right way, and I’ve done it the wrong way. I learned a hard lesson when contracts that I thought were concrete turned out to be not worth the paper they were written on. And conversely, I’ve also found out that contracts I had relied on had additional clauses entered without my knowledge that I had to dispute in court.

In this guide, I’ll go through the various steps to help you think through the process of contract writing, agreement, and signing, with a bit of contract law thrown in for good measure.

Consideration one: Preliminary discussions before contract writing

First things first, before even thinking about writing a contract you need to have a baseline from which to work. Talk through with your client what your expectations are. Ideally, capture this in a series of emails or messages as you can refer back to during contract writing (or later if needs be).

Consideration two: Know how contract law will affect you

We’ve got a blog post which goes over in more detail some contract law so you can avoid some of the pitfalls. For example, are the parties entering into the contract legal entities? In the U.S. this means, amongst other things, you must be over 18, and not bankrupt to legally enter into a contract.

Consideration three: Writing a contract – using a template

If you are creating a standard contract, such as a Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA), you may well already have a template. I’ve got an example here of an NDA I’ve used in a previous business (shown below). I used the same sort of format across a number of companies. However, I did have a lawyer help create it, and advise on important clauses. Signature platforms like ApproveMe allow you to store contract templates for reuse. Templates are a very useful tool to save time, and reduce mistakes.

Consideration four: Contract considerations

Considerations are the things that both parties agree to. So, for example, this could be the payment amount and terms. Payment, in particular, seems to be a sticking point in contracts, so it is best to get to get payment terms totally firmed up and very clearly set out.

In the case of an NDA, considerations are fairly straightforward. In the case of the NDA below, pretty much everything under the ‘It is agreed’ section, covers the considerations, for example:

“keep in confidence any Confidential Information disclosed to it by the other party and will not disclose that Confidential Information to any person…”

In a contract that requires deliverables, such as a set of wireframes for a website, you would set out exactly what the deliverables were when they would be delivered (give exact dates, do not be vague) and what the cost of each deliverable was. In other words, don’t leave anything at all open for discussion, make it very plain so there can be no misunderstanding about what the contract expectations are.

Consideration five: Keeping it confidential

Our contract example is an NDA which is by definition about confidentiality. However, even contracts where you are doing an exchange of deliverables/money, you should still consider adding a confidentiality clause into it, to make sure that any ideas or proprietary information that either of you share, is protected.

Consideration six: Get out of jail free card

An important option to build into a contract is the idea of termination. Having a termination clause in a contract means that either party, with a given reason, can cancel the contract. I’ve had contracts where this clause has been a simple:

“if either party wishes to terminate the contract, for whatever reason, they can do so with 3 months notice”.

A similar clause might go something like:

“[Company name] may terminate this Agreement at any time by providing the client [name] with [x weeks / months] written notice, without any further obligation or compensation.”

However, you should check out local state laws that might impact on your use of termination clauses in your area.

Consideration seven: Mediation

You and your client may be completely happy bunnies at the time of agreeing your contract, but you know what relationships are like, they can turn sour. In this case, having a clause in the contract which provides a solution to a disagreement through arbitration is useful. Arbitration or the alternative, mediation, is voluntary and allows both parties to air their issues with a neutral third party. online homework help for free It is a bit like marriage guidance, but in the case of arbitration, the arbitrator will make a decision to resolve the issue after hearing each side’s views.

Consideration eight: Professional advice

When drawing up a contract for the first time, is a good idea to use a lawyer. It might seem like a lot of money, but it’s cheaper than a court case – believe me. Work with the lawyer to get a boilerplate contract that you can use as a template for other clients. This way you can use it in an e-signature platform like ApproveMe as part of a workflow process to create, agree, sign, and complete a contract.

Consideration nine: Do it online

One of the things that holds up a contract signing process is the time it takes to distribute the contract and collect the signatures, especially if there are multiple signatures needed. If you use an e-signature platform that complies with digital signature laws, like ESIGN, and that has built in workflow and audit capability, you can get a contract agreed, signed, sealed, and delivered without moving from your desk. ApproveMe has all of the features needed to make sure that once you have an agreed contract, that abides by contract law, that the signing of the contract is achieved easily and seamlessly.

Check out the ApproveMe WordPress plugin which makes signing agreed contracts easy and lawful.

How to write a proper summary for Dummies by Dummies!

Pham, D. (2016, July 15). What you need to know about HAN’s innovative Study Centre [Photograph]. business plan for a restaurant Retrieved from https://blog.han.nl/abs/2016/07/15/what-to-know-about-han-study-centre/

Many students are struggling to create a proper summary , but it is easier than you think.(Gasp! I know right). So by following these seven simple steps you can create an amazing summary for every subject, no matter how boring the subject!

Step 1 → Scan and divide . First of all, scan through the text that you are going to summarize and divide this into chapters. Look for bold-faced words and study these before you continue reading further.

Step 2 → Reading. Now that you have scanned and divided, start reading the selected text. Don’t spend time trying to understand difficult parts; this is just to get a ‘feel’.

Step 3 → Active Reading. Read it through again and underline key facts and important sentences. Make reference points for your summary so you know where to find the information.

Step 4 → One sentence per section. Now that you have divided and selected certain areas of text, try to summarize these sections in one clear sentence. You should include key points in the sentence, not minor details; these are too hard to remember.

Step 5 → Create a statement. Combine all sentences together and create a clear statement. The statement should capture what the entire text is trying to achieve.

Step 6 → Start Writing! Your draft is done and you are now ready to write a full summary of your subject. Use the statement as an introduction for your summary and add in the other sentences in the body. Connect them together to create a flow in your summary.

Step 7 → Re-read your work. Check your summary and make sure that you have accurately written down the key points and ideas of the author. Make sure you used citations properly.

One Last tip I always forget or just simply neglect is: START ON TIME! Even writing that makes me sound like a Mom, but hey it’s a good tip ;).

At the end of the day, everyone is different, so what might work for some might not work for you, so take these as suggestions and find out which methods work for you.

And that’s it, simple right? Now stop being lazy and start writing your awesome summary and tune in next week for the next blog!

Business Writing For Dummies

Business Writing For Dummies

Description

How many pieces of paper land on your desk each day, or emails in your inbox? Your readers – the people you communicate with at work – are no different.

So how can you make your communication stand out from the pile and get the job done? Whether you’re crafting a short and sweet email or bidding for a crucial project, Business Writing For Dummies is the only guide you need. Inside you’ll find:

  • The basic principles of how to write well
  • How to avoid the common pitfalls that immediately turn a reader off
  • Crucial tips for self-editing and revision techniques to heighten your impact
  • Lots of practical advice and examples covering a range of different types of communication, including emails, letters, major business documents such as reports and proposals, promotional materials, web copy and blogs – even tweets
  • The global touch – understand the key differences in written communication around the world, and how to tailor your writing for international audiences

Related Resources

Instructor

About the Author

Natalie Canavor is a business writer, workshop leader and adjunct professor at New York University, where she teaches advanced writing courses. Natalie's work as a journalist and organizational communicator has won international recognition. She uses her experience to help businesspeople and professionals write for results and achieve their career goals.

Part I: Winning with Writing  7

Chapter 1: Make Writing Your Not-So-Secret Weapon 9

Chapter 2: Planning Your Message: Your Secret Weapon 21

Chapter 3: Making Your Writing Work: The Basics 47

Chapter 4: Self-Editing: Professional Ways to Improve Your Own Work 73

Chapter 5: Troubleshooting Your Writing: Fixing Common Problems 99

Part II: Putting Your Skills to Work for Everyday Business Writing 123

Chapter 6: Writing Emails That Get Results 125

Chapter 7: Creating High Impact Business Correspondence 149

Part III: Writing Business Documents, Promotional Material and Presentations 175

Chapter 8: Building the Biggies: Major Business Documents 177

Chapter 9: Promoting Yourself and Your Organization 201

Chapter 10: Writing for the Spoken Word 223

Part IV: Writing for the Digital Universe 247

Chapter 11: Evolving Your Writing for Online Media 249

Chapter 12: Writing for Websites and Blogs 269

Part V: Thinking Global, Writing Global 297

Chapter 13: Using English as the Global Language of Business 299

Chapter 14: Adapting Business English to Specific Countries 313

Part VI: The Part of Tens 335

Chapter 15: Ten Ways to Advance Your Career with Writing 337

Chapter 16: Ten Ways to Tweet Strategically 345

Creative Writing For Dummies (English, Paperback, Hamand Maggie Hamand)

  • Language: English
  • Binding: Paperback
  • Publisher: For Dummies
  • Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines
  • ISBN: 9780470742914, 0470742917
  • Edition: UK edition

“Creative Writing For Dummies” covers:

Part I: Getting started Chapter 1: Can Everyone Write?Chapter 2: Getting into the Write MindChapter 3: Finding the Material to work with

Part II: The Elements of Creative Writing Chapter 4: Creating CharactersChapter 5: Discovering DialogueChapter 6: Who is telling the story?Chapter 7: Creating your own worldChapter 8: Plotting your wayChapter 9: Creating a StructureChapter 10: Rewriting and editing

Part III: Different Kinds of Fiction WritingChapter 11: Short storiesChapter 12: NovelsChapter 13: Writing for childrenChapter 14: PlaysChapter 15: ScreenplaysChapter 16: Poetry

Part IV: Different kinds of Non-fiction writing Chapter 17: Breaking into journalism – Writing articles/ magazine writingChapter 18: Writing from life and autobiographyChapter 19: Embroidering the facts: Narrative non-fictionChapter 20: Exploring the world from your armchair – Travel writingChapter 21: Blogging – the new big thing

Part V: Finding an audience Chapter 22: Finding editors/ publishers/ agents Chapter 23: Becoming a professional

Part VI: Part of Tens Chapter 24: Ten top tips for writers Chapter 25: Ten ways to get noticed

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