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  • Reckoning and Reviewing Exercise 4
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Fall 2011
  • Nadiah Khalil October 25, 2011 Writing The Essay 1. After reading about inner peace that comes with self sufficiency and the specific individuals that cannot seem to forgo past political indifferences
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Reckoning and Reviewing Exercise 4

  • Exercise 2 Representation Revisited
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Writing the Essay Exercise 2: Representation Revisited I have noticed of late that more modern essays are written in a manner inherently more efficient than the styl
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Exercise 2 Representation Revisited

  • Exercise 1 Representation
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Exercise 1 1/29/15 If we are to explore the realities, intents, and connotations presented by Plato in his Allegory of the Cave, we must first examine the context of
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Exercise 1 Representation

  • Exercise 3
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Exercise 3 Futility Nevertheless after a pause of exhaustion the legs fluttered again. this gigantic effort on the part of an insignificant little moth, against a power of such magnitude, t
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  • Progression 2 Exercise 3
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Writing the Essay Progression 2 Exercise 3 Generation Why? Like the Thoreau essay, Generation Why? Gives us an opposing view to The IRL Fetish. It, rather condescend
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Progression 2 Exercise 3

  • Progression 1 Exercise 1
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Writing the Essay Progression 2 Exercise 1 Article: The IRL Fetish Explicit: – Lost Reality: The idea that with the rise of the information age, weve somehow – becom
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Progression 1 Exercise 1

  • Progression 2 Exercise 2
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Writing the Essay Progression 2 Exercise 2 1. The more real things become, the less immersive. Reality and imagination meet in the digi-scape. The apex of stimulatio
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Progression 2 Exercise 2

  • Progression 2 Exercise 4 5
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Writing the Essay Exercise 4/5 Part 1) Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers Kurt Squire and Eric Klopfer The Journal of the Learning Sciences Vol. 16,
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Progression 2 Exercise 4 5

  • 1.1 Journal
  • NYU
  • Writing the Essay
  • WTE 101 – Fall 2014
  • Beauty is defined in countless ways. Koreans treasure high-bridged noses and double-lidded eyes, paying millions each year to purchase them from plastic surgeons. Americans prefer tanned skin, so they
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  • Exercise 5
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Writing the Essay Exercise 5 Painting: Marriage -la-mode: 2. The Tte Tte It was about noon, and I was drivingnot cruisingalong some back road in one of the, well, le
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  • Exercise 4 Scene
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger WTE Exercise 4: Scene Virginia Woolf was writing in a post-World War I world, the 1920s. Alongside her contemporaries, among them, T.S Eliot, she wrote, exploring mo
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Exercise 4 Scene

  • Progression 2 Exercise 4 5-Victor Leung's MacBook Pro
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Writing the Essay Exercise 4/5 Part 1) Augmented Reality Simulations on Handheld Computers Kurt Squire and Eric Klopfer The Journal of the Learning Sciences Vol. 16,
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Progression 2 Exercise 4 5-Victor Leung's MacBook Pro

  • GordonProg4Draft2
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • GordonProg4Draft2 Emma Muto Gordon March 11th 2015 The artist George Seurat speaks while he paints. White. A blank page or canvas (music plays). The challenge; bring order to the whole (music continue
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  • GordonProg4Rewrite
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • The Twisted Relationship: Reworking American musical traditions The artist George Seurat speaks while he paints. White. A blank page or canvas (music plays). The challenge; bring order to the whole (m
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  • GordonProg5Draft3
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • GordonProg5Draft3 In a mock recreation of the famed photograph of the workers on the beam at the Empire State building, twelve women sit abreast on the beam, with a thirteenth climbing to join them. F
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  • GordonProg4Draft3
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • GordonProg4Draft3 Emma Muto Gordon March 23rd 2015 The artist George Seurat speaks while he paints. White. A blank page or canvas (music plays). The challenge; bring order to the whole (music continue
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  • GordonP4E2
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Emma Gordon Progression 4 Ex. 2 February 2nd 2015 3) Three Art Movements History and movement in Theatre -Particularly Musical Theatre History and movement in Art -The transition from God and Renais
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  • Progression 3 Exercise 5
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Writing the Essay Progression 3 Exercise 5 1. Jonathan Swift wrote with a certain verbosity, aspect to his times, that, with parentheticals, and interjections, wrote
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Progression 3 Exercise 5

  • Progression 3 Exercise 1
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Writing the Essay Professor Shullenberger Progression 3 Exercise 1 1. Jonathan Swift, in his essay, A Modest Proposal, tends to, rather like this, interject, multiple times, within each of
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Progression 3 Exercise 1

  • Hannaford Reckoning Essay
  • NYU
  • WTE 101 – Fall 2014
  • Hannaford 1 ! Reid Hannaford Prof. Colm OShea Writing the Essay November 10, 2014 Superstition and Transcending Rational Thought What is superstition if not the utter realization that we have no clue
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Hannaford Reckoning Essay

  • Essay3
  • NYU
  • WTE 101 – Fall 2014
  • Hannaford 1 ! Reid Hannaford Prof. Colm OShea Writing the Essay December 10, 2014 Clichs in The Big Lebowski: An Invitation for Meaningful Thought As a tumbleweed drifts across the screen, the gentle,
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  • Deepening Essay V2
  • NYU
  • WTE 101 – Fall 2014
  • Hannaford 1 ! Reid Hannaford Prof. Colm OShea Writing the Essay October 6, 2014 ! Bitter Falsities of the Disillusioned Mind Intellectual enlightenment is usually thought of as a positive experience.
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Deepening Essay V2

  • Progression 2
  • NYU
  • WTE 101 – Fall 2014
  • Hannaford 1 ! Reid Hannaford Josh Goldfaden Writing the Essay May 11, 2015 Guilty Dieting and Misconception of Meat Production Ones diet is an incredibly sensitive subject. When people are questioned
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  • Prog. 1 – Final V1
  • NYU
  • WTE 101 – Fall 2014
  • Hannaford 1 ! Reid Hannaford Josh Goldfaden Writing the Essay March 23, 2015 David Fincher and the Hidden Techniques of Auteurism When you sit down in the theatre to watch David Finchers newest film,
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Prog. 1 – Final V1

  • Exersize 6
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Writing the Essay Exercise 6: Letter Hey *Anthony! Do you remember how, long ago in a high-school far, far way, we used to talk about religion? How, back then, you w
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  • Essay 2 Beginnings
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Essay 2 Beginnings (The IRL Fetish) Eric Leung Writing the Essay 1. In the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, we have a Piero di Cosimo painting which shows early attempts at perspective. Perspec
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Essay 2 Beginnings

  • Essay 1 Openings
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Writing the Essay Professor Shullenberger Essay Openings 1) So it has become that authenticity is rare. We see a person, and all that we know is the facade behind which they hide. Is this s
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Essay 1 Openings

  • Essay 3
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Writing the Essay Essay 3 On Jonathan Swift I have before me a small bag, shaped as a rectangle with a sort of trapezoid on it, dangling on a string. As I lower the
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  • Essay 2 Draft 1
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • Eric Leung Writing the Essay Professor Shullenberger Essay 2 Draft 1 In the past decade and a half, since the turn of the century, weve experienced a never-before-seen spur of gadgets and new technolo
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Essay 2 Draft 1

  • Essay 1 Revision
  • NYU
  • Writing The Essay
  • WTE 101 – Spring 2015
  • 1 Eric Leung Professor Shullenberger Writing the Essay Essay #1 REVISED 42 What is the meaning of life? Douglas Adams jokes in his novel, The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, that the answer is vaguel
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Essay 1 Revision

Writing The Essay Questions & Answers

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How to Write the New York University Application Essay 2017-2018

New York University, located in Manhattan, is a city school in every sense of the phrase. Indeed, it’s hard to tell where the campus ends and where the city begins. The school itself is the largest private university in the United States, with over 44,000 students and 150 undergraduate majors. With high-quality academics and impressive study abroad programs, it’s no wonder NYU is one of the nation’s best schools.

However, with an amazing school also comes high selectivity. In the 2016-17 school year, NYU accepted just 27% of applicants. This means writing a solid essay is more important than ever.

We here at CollegeVine are here to help. Read on for our tips on how to tackle the NYU essay.

NYC Application Essay Prompt

Lucky for you, NYU has only one essay! Don’t celebrate too early though; while this may seem like less work for you, it also leaves less room for error. This one essay will likely give your application its defining personality and edge.

We would like to know more about your interest in NYU. We are particularly interested in knowing what motivated you to apply to NYU and more specifically, why you have applied or expressed interest in a particular campus, school, college, program, and/or area of study? If you have applied to more than one, please tell us why you are interested in each of the campuses, schools, colleges, or programs to which you have applied. You may be focused or undecided, or simply open to the options within NYU’s global network; regardless, we want to understand — Why NYU? (400 word maximum)

At first glance, there are a lot of words in this question, so let’s take a moment to decompose it.

It really boils down to two parts:

  • Why are you applying to NYU?
  • What are you interested in studying?

However, a common mistake would be to address the question in two parts. You want to write a cohesive essay that incorporates both parts seamlessly.

Pinpoint Your Specific Interest

There are many generic answers to this question. “I love New York City” and “NYU is such a good school” fall into this category. We highly recommend staying away from these stale answers, but if you do reference them, make sure they reflect on your personal interests.

For example, if your desire to live in NYC is predicated on its prominence in the fashion world, tell the admissions officer that. However, saying you “want to hang out in Times Square” with no other explanation isn’t good; after all, you could just vacation in New York City sometime! By addressing this correctly, not only will you be communicating how NYU is a great fit for you, but you’ll also be showing off one of your interests.

Keep in mind that a majority of essays will reference NYC in a significant way, so it might be advantageous to take a different approach to this question. NYU is famous for its study-abroad program; over 3,000 undergraduates take advantage of this opportunity every year!

By studying abroad in places like Abu Dhabi or Shanghai, you could have a truly cosmopolitan experience as an undergraduate at NYU. You could write about how you would hope NYC is only one part of the broader cultural experience you hope to have, giving your application an interesting twist that most other applicants might not be focusing on.

By pinpointing your interest in NYU, whether it is broad or very specific, you will be able to establish the foundation of your response.

Discuss Relevant Opportunities

In addition, this prompt also asks you what you’d like to study at NYU.

You could start by discussing what program(s) you are applying to. For each of these programs, you have to cite why you’re interested in it. If you have past experience related to the major, this is the spot to discuss it. An incoming biology major could write about science fair projects and volunteer work at their local hospital; an incoming journalism major could write about previously published work and a love for writing. If you don’t have experience, explain why the major(s) fit your strengths and interests.

If you have multiple interests, you might want to suggest how you hope to combine them. Someone interested in both biology and journalism could express their interest in writing for a science-oriented journal published in New York City. This would be far more memorable than someone mentioning two disjoint majors they’re interested in.

Moreover, an answer like “I’m good at physics” doesn’t scream “admit me to your physics department!” Even if you have no idea what you’d like to study, explain to NYU what you’re interested in. Be detail-oriented. If your interests include math, explain why you would love to work with a certain NYU math professor; if you have a passion for writing and acting in comedy sketches, specify how certain NYC comedy clubs match your interests and expertise.

What are some specific things you could talk about? As we mentioned before, NYU is famous for its study-abroad program . Certain departments like the Department of Philosophy are exceptional, as well. The Gallatin School is renowned for its personalized and unique independent study programs. These are certainly relevant opportunities the university wants you to take advantage of during your time at NYU, but we recommend that you do your research and find where you fit best.

Don’t Worry — We’ll edit your admissions essay in a few hours.

Submit your essay and we’ll get it back to you with helpful edits.

Be Comprehensive

Finally, keep in mind you only have 400 words to work with in this essay. Therefore, it is important that you don’t belabor one point too excessively.

Instead of jumping from one point to the next, try to develop one response by integrating these three main points:

  1. Your personal background
  2. “Why this Major?” (academic interest)
  3. “Why NYU ?” (overall interest in the university)

In this way, you can answer all of the prompts questions by allowing your points to support each other. The following section provides a description of what this strategy would look like in practice.

Example: Tying the Strategies Together

If you want to study fashion, you could start by explaining how NYU is located in the optimal location for fashion studies. An excellent opening would be a florid description of multiple new styles and fashion lines currently on the runway, as well as your own explanation of how you design new styles. You could continue describing to the reader the process of how you show off your designs at local fashion expos, with your eventual goal being an entrance at NYC’s fashion shows.

Then, as a seamless transition, you could write about how the Program in Global Fashion at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study is the perfect program for you to branch out as a designer and learn from more experienced mentors. You could then conclude with a summary of how NYU would allow you to reach your full potential not just as a designer but as an entrepreneur, as the university boasts an exceptional network and connections within the city.

By structuring your essay in this manner, your interests in fashion and NYU are front and center, with the your nuances and details showing NYU exactly why they should admit you.

General Reminders

A great essay is quite possibly the easiest way to distinguish yourself from thousands of other accomplished applicants. From everyone here at CollegeVine, we wish you the best of luck writing your NYU essay!

Want us to quickly edit your college essay? Submit it to our Rapid Review Program, and we’ll get it back to you quickly with comments from our expert team.

Need help with your apps?

We’ve helped thousands of students write amazing college essays. One of our students was featured on Business Insider for the essay that got him into 7 Ivy League schools. Learn more about how our Apps Program can help your chances of admission.

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Latest posts by CollegeVine College Essay Team (see all)

  • How to Write the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Essays 2017-2018 – September 26, 2017
  • How to Write the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Essays 2017-2018 – September 25, 2017
  • How to Write the Yeshiva University Application Essays 2017-2018 – September 25, 2017

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New York University (NYU) 2017-18 Supplemental Essay Prompt Guide

The Requirements: One prompt. 400 words.

Supplemental Essay Type(s): Why

New York University (NYU) 2017-18 Application Essay Explanations

Ladies and gentlemen, you are about to witness an optical illusion. The lengthy paragraph below comprises one (1), and only one (1) college essay prompt. While the read may be a bit of a slog, you’re also in luck because this prompt is the one (1) and only supplemental essay NYU hopefuls are expected to write! Laying out the requirements for a 400-word personal statement, the prompt itself clocks in at nearly a quarter of that length. Knowing that your application time is precious, NYU must have had some reason to pen a prompt of this size, so it’s important to note each specific requirement and every minute detail that could give you some inkling as to how to tell your own story. Let’s break it down.

We would like to know more about your interest in NYU. We are particularly interested in knowing what motivated you to apply to NYU and more specifically, why you have applied or expressed interest in a particular campus, school, college, program, and/or area of study? If you have applied to more than one, please tell us why you are interested in each of the campuses, schools, colleges, or programs to which you have applied. You may be focused or undecided, or simply open to the options within NYU’s global network; regardless, we want to understand – Why NYU? (400 word maximum)

This meandering paragraph asks the most straightforward supplemental question you’ll find: Why here? But before you let the words, “Why wouldn’t I want to spend the next four years of my life in the greatest city in the world?” cross your lips, take a closer look. In addition to offering your unique take on why an NYU education is right for you, you’ll also need to make sure your answer ticks off a few specific boxes. Firstly, NYU wants a drill down of your reasoning from your campus selection all the way to your specific program of choice. The question isn’t just “Why NYU,” but “Why do YOU want to study this topic at this time in this geographical context via NYU?” And, of course, if you’ve applied to more than one campus, you’ll want to explain how each location can meet your needs in ways that are both unique and somehow equivalent. You wouldn’t apply to Abu Dhabi if Paris was the only place for you, right? The nice thing about being able to focus on geography is that you don’t have to have a fully fleshed out plan for your major; instead, you can focus on the experiential and cultural elements that will feed into your education. How will living in New York or abroad affect you as a person? As a student? How will you grow?

Your answer should be personal to you and, if possible, surprising. Remember that while you have a free reign to gush about how much you want to live in New York, New York, a lot of your potential peers probably feel the same way. So, try not to focus on what you’d like to do or see. Instead, explain what your desire to move from your hometown to New York says about you. Whether you’re trying to be courageous by leaving your small homogenous town or hoping to stay close to your family in Brooklyn, what is your personal reason? And don’t forget that you’re still writing about a school! Is there a professor in your department who has done research you admire that you hope to work with? Is there a program that combines your unique interests that is not offered at any other school? Get specific, but don’t worry about being comprehensive. You’ve only got 400 words, after all!

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How To Survive (And Love?) Writing the Essay

Writing the Essay is arguably the most notorious first-year requirement at New York University — it has a reputation that not only terrifies all incoming students but also lingers with dread in the minds of those who have taken the course semesters ago. But is it really all that bad? To all of you who immediately thought “yes,” it is time to discuss the bad along with the good — and give some solid advice to all future first-year students.

As a first-year student myself, it is with the horror of my peers that I admit that Writing the Essay has been my favorite course over these past two semesters. My professor was fantastic, the course load was not too overwhelming, and my writing was truly refined throughout the progressions. There have been plenty of moments where I doubted my academic sanity, but I have justified my admiration of the course with my passion for writing. As an anticipated Journalism major, it seems slightly more acceptable that I enjoyed Writing the Essay. For all of you out there who are nervous about the course and who may not share the same enjoyment in writing academic essays as I do, I talked with other first-year students to come up with a few steps that will help you conquer the most infamous first-year course of them all:

1) Be open-minded

Sal Maicki, Journalism and Philosophy Double Major, CAS

“I think to succeed in Writing the Essay you have to go in completely open-minded — you have to completely throw out the notions associated with the class and the idea that it is automatically going to suck and have no purpose in your college agenda other than being a requirement. You will get out what you put into it. I’m glad I went into my class with an open mind because my professor turned out to be really cool — we had really cool assignments, we even analyzed Beck lyrics and the openings to Wes Anderson films. So I think if you approach it with an optimistic perspective it will definitely make you a better writer.”

This may be the most important step in your success in the course. The first day of class, my professor asked us who had heard that this would be the worst class of their freshman year — everyone raised their hands. Over the course of a semester, my professor worked to disprove those assumptions and showed each of us how much the rumors had been exaggerated.

2) Know your options

Tomas Gepts, Biology Major, CAS

“I think the first thing that really helped me was knowing that there was more than one option for Writing the Essay — there’s Writing the Essay for science, so they have it geared for different interests. If one of those interests matches your interests then I really think it’s worth taking. I’m a Bio major and I took Writing the Essay for science, and I think that’s a lot better for me than the regular Writing the Essay would have been.”

There are different Writing the Essay themed courses that you can take, including a science-oriented class, as well as one that is paired with Texts and Ideas. Depending on your interests, this may help improve your experience by pairing preferred academic fields with the writing curriculum.

3) Know your resources

Justus Pennington, Neuroscience Major, CAS

“You need to go to the tutoring centers even if you feel a little bit nervous about your essays. The resources at the University Learning Center really helped my grade and improved my writing.”

There are plenty of resources available for students who are struggling with the course. The Academic Resource Center (located downstairs in the Argo Tea building) offers peer tutoring sessions as well as academic skills workshops that help to edit drafts and improve proofreading strategies.

4) Research your professors

Joey Beerman, Jazz Major, Steinhardt

“Professors definitely matter. My professor — Sam Beebe — is a very youthful teacher and brings a lot of music and movies into the assignments. He’s easy to get along with and a very friendly teacher.”

If I did not have such an awesome professor for this course, I probably would not have liked it nearly as much. When I compared my course work to the course work of my friends, there were huge differences that made me very thankful that I was assigned practical and helpful exercises — not just busywork. I would not recommend solely relying on Rate My Professors, but it does help start the process of finding a solid professor.

5) Acknowledge that it won’t be an “easy A”

“I’m taking Writing the Essay right now and I can say that I’m enjoying the class. The work is hard but if you stay on top of it it’s fine. The writing style is different than it was in high school but if you put in the effort I think your writing will improve.”

This was not my favorite course because it was easy — in reality, it was probably the hardest of my courses and it required the most time and effort. It will be a challenging course but it will also be extremely fulfilling if you give it your all. As an incoming college student, it is important to understand that you want to get the most out of your money, so “easier” courses do not necessarily translate to “better” courses.

6) In the end, it’s all about surviving

Claire Leonard, Political Science Major, CAS

“My advice to incoming freshman about Writing the Essay is to take it the fall of your freshman year and make sure you get a great professor. I think some progressions are helpful but mainly you just have to survive.”

Even if you try to follow all the advice on taking Writing the Essay, you could still end up hating it just as much as everyone else. Ultimately, you do not have to love it — you just have to survive. In the end, you may not be a better person, but hey, at least you won’t have to take it again!

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