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Writing Today

by Richard Johnson-Sheehan

With a clear and easy-to-read presentation, visual instruction, and pedagogical support, Writing Today is a practical and useful guide to writing in college and beyond.

With a clear and easy-to-read presentation, visual instruction, and pedagogical support, Writing Today is a practical and useful guide to writing in college and beyond.

Get a copy

Friends’ Reviews

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Community Reviews

Michelle rated it really liked it

Erin rated it it was ok

Ray Ziemer rated it really liked it

Simple, short chapters.

Theme is by genre of writing, but adaptable to any approach. Recognizes writing process issues, of course.

DeVry uses it for both its freshman composition courses, so I hope to use it again when and if I teach the second. Read full review

Higher Education

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This work is protected by local and international copyright laws and is provided solely for the use of instructors in teaching their courses and assessing student learning. Dissemination or sale of any part of this work (including on the World Wide Web) will destroy the integrity of the work and is not permitted. The work and materials from this site should never be made available to students except by instructors using the accompanying text in their classes. All recipients of this work are expected to abide by these restrictions and to honor the intended pedagogical purposes and the needs of other instructors who rely on these materials.

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path/ProductBean/courseSmarttrue ISBN-10: 0205951228 • ISBN-13: 9780205951222 9780205951222 9780205945665 ©2014 • Pearson Education Canada • Paper Bound with Access Card, 680 pp Published 01/15/2013 This item is out of print and has been replaced with

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About This Product

Description

A genre-based approach to teaching academic writing.

Students need to learn to write successfully for their college and university courses, but they also want to learn how to transfer their writing skills into their careers. By teaching genres of writing (analyses, reports, proposals, etc.), strategies for writing (narration, comparison, argumentation, etc.), and processes for writing (planning, drafting, revising, etc.), Writing Today provides students with tools they can mix and match as needed to respond effectively to many writing situations both in school and beyond.

Writing Today offers students the comprehensive and detailed instruction they need using a highly-praised, interactive writing style that reflects the way they read and learn: instruction is succinct; key concepts are immediately defined and reinforced; paragraphs are short and supported by instructional visuals. This interactive presentation helps students ask questions of the text, raid it for answers, and access knowledge when they are ready for it, putting students in control of their learning.

With the clear and easy-to-read presentation students want, visual instruction students prefer, and pedagogical support students need, Writing Today is a practical and useful guide to writing for university and beyond.

Teaching & Learning Experience

This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience—for you and your students. Here’s how:

  • Personalize Learning—The new MyCompLab delivers proven results in helping student succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.
  • Engage Students—Strong instructional design elements, interesting writing samples, and an interactive writing style provide students with a relevant learning experience.
  • Improve Writing—Equal coverage of writing genres, the writing process, and strategies for writing give students the skills that will help them succeed.
  • Support Instructors—The Instructor’s Manual offers teaching strategies and support for each chapter and reading in the book.

PERSONALIZE LEARNING WITH MYCOMPLAB

  • The new MyCompLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.
  • The Pearson eText allows students to access their textbook anytime, anywhere, and any way they want–including on their iPad. eText pages look exactly like the printed text and offer powerful new functionality for students and instructors. Users can create notes, highlight text in different colours, create bookmarks, zoom, click hyperlinked words and phrases to view definitions, and view in single page or two page view.
  • eText icons are hyperlinked to related material within MyCompLab :
    • Explore icons link to writing samples
    • Watchicons link to video simulations and animated lessons
    • Listenicons link to instruction and practice questions that can be downloaded and listened to on an MP3 player
  • Sections on writing, research, and grammar cover all the key topics in the text, providing additional instruction, examples, and practice.
  • Exercises offer the opportunity to practise the skills learned in class and include both self-grading quizzes and writing activities.
  • Writing samples provide examples of different types of writing and different documentation styles; some are annotated to highlight key aspects or to stimulate reflection and discussion.
  • Videos illustrate aspects of the writing process through scenarios, or provide grammar and editing tutorials through onscreen revision.
  • An online composing space includes tools such as writing tips and editing FAQs, so students can get the help they need when they need it without ever leaving the writing environment. Within this space, they’ll find access to EBSCO’s ContentSelect, a database of articles from academic journals that can be used for research and reference.
  • The portfolio feature allows students to create an e-portfolio of their work that they can easily share with their instructor and peers.
  • An assignment calendar allows instructors to assign graded activities, with specific deadlines, and measure student progress.

  • Interactive writing style that reflects the way today’s students read, learn, process, and disseminate information through media and technology.
  • Straightforward presentation of complex information creates a reading experience in which students can access information when they are ready for it:
    • Clear instructions that are brief and to the point
    • Key concepts are immediately defined and reinforced
    • Short sections and paragraphs
    • Important points are clearly labelled and supported by instructional visuals
  • Visually appealing two pagepart openers introduce students to what they will learn in the upcoming chapters.
  • Learning Objectives at the start of each chapter provide brief learning objectives to orient students to the content.
  • End-of-Chapter Activities help students understand and practice the concepts and strategies they have just learned:
    • Talk About This questions prompt classroom discussion
    • Try This Out exercises suggest informal writing activities students can complete in class or as homework
    • Write This prompts facilitate longer, formal writing assignments
  • NEWStudy on the Go scan codes link students to Pearson Canada’s unique Study on the Go content directly from their smartphones, allowing them to study whenever and wherever they wish. Upon scanning, students can follow the online instructions to search the rich study assets including Videos, Quizzes, and Glossary Flashcards.

  • Teaches students to master seven commonly assigned kinds of writing that form the foundation of an adaptable portfolio of skills: summary, review, rhetorical analysis, literary analysis, argumentations, proposal, and research papers.
  • At-A-Glance chapter opening diagrams in Part 2 demonstrate one or two common ways to organize a genre’s key elements, giving an immediate and visual orientation to the genre. Students will learn to adapt this organization to suit their rhetorical situation as they read the chapter.
  • One Student’s Work writing samples early in each chapter in Part 2 demonstrate the kinds of issues students might explore in a specific genre of writing as well as the angles they might take. Annotations highlight the writer’s key rhetorical decisions so the reading can be used either for discussion or as a model.
  • Applying the Genre writing samples in Part 2 illustrate how writers apply features of major genres to specific academic situations. For example, Chapter 5 on reviews applies the elements of summary and evaluation to literature reviews.
  • Professional Readings from popular and academic sources offer models of each genre. These readings feature content with Canadian references and interest point and address five relevant themes: consumerism, environment and sustainability, gender, media and communication, and migration and ethnicity. Each reading is accompanied by the following pedagogical features that encourage students to think critically:
    • Annotations identify the key modes in each reading for better student comprehension.
    • A Closer Look questions facilitate analytical reading
    • Ideas for Writing questions prompt responses, analyses, and different genres of writing

  • Specifically teaches the writing process (planning, drafting, revisions, etc.) and strategies for writing (narration, comparison, argumentation, etc.).
  • Covers the expectations for academic writing in Canadian universities and colleges by teaching the differences between popular and academic forms.
  • Teaches students how to transform popular forms of argumentation, analysis, research, or evaluation with which they may be more familiar into styles appropriate for academic contexts.
  • Quick Start Guides at the end of each chapter offer specific, to-the-point guidance to get students writing so they spend less time reading about writing, and more time working on their own composition. Students can also use the Quick Start Guide as an efficient way to gain familiarity with a genre before reading the chapter.
  • An entire section teaches students to use portfolios, social networking, and other Web applications to publically present their work.
  • A Handbook in Part 7 covers the basics of grammar and mechanics, with brief discussions and examples. MyCompLab icons direct students to online animations for help with key problem areas.
  • Up-to-date MLA and APA citation guides complete with examples.

  • The Instructor’s Manual offers teaching strategies and support for each chapter and reading in the book.
  • The assignment calendar within MyCompLab allows instructors to assign graded activities, with specific deadlines, and measure student progress.
  • Create a Custom Text–For enrollments as low as 25 students, instructors can customize their own textbook by combining chapters from best-selling Pearson textbooks and/or reading selections in the sequence they want. To begin building your custom text, visit www.pearsoncustomlibrary.com. Instructors may also work with a dedicated Pearson Custom editor to create their ideal text–publishing their own original content or mixing and matching Pearson content. Contact a Pearson Publisher’s Representative to get started.

Table of Contents

PART 1: Getting Started

1 Writing and Genres

2 Topic, Angle, and Purpose

3 Readers, Contexts, and Rhetorical Situations

PART 2: Using Genres to Express Ideas

Reading: Anne Kingston, excerpt from “Outraged moms, trashy daughters,” Maclean’s

Readings: Brian D. Johnson, “Bare-Knuckled Knockout,” Maclean’s (movie review); James Kendrick, “The Many Shades of Red,” Film Philosophy Journal (book review); Z. Lawrie, E.A. Sullivan, P.S.W. Davies, and R.J. Hill, excerpt from “Media Influence on the Body Image of Children and Adolescents,” Eating Disorders (literature review from research paper)

6 Rhetorical Analyses

Readings: Liza Featherstone, “What’s a Girl to Read?” AlterNet; Emily Martin, excerpt from “The Egg and the Sperm: How Science Has Constructed a Romance Based on Stereotypical Male-Female Roles,” Signs

7 Literary Analyses

Readings: Thomas King, “Borders,” from One Good Story, That One (short story); Jennifer Andrews and Priscilla L. Walton, excerpt from “Rethinking Canadian and American Nationality: Indigeneity and the 49 th Parallel in Thomas King,” American Literary History

8 Position Papers and Arguments

Readings: Russ Walker and David Roberts, “Letter to the Editor on Climate Story,” Politico; Kate Daily, “Friends with Benefits: Do Facebook Friends Provide the Same Support as Those in Real Life?” Newsweek

Readings: Derek Rasmussen, excerpt from “Forty Years of Struggle and Still no Right to Inuit Education in Nunavut,” Interchange; M.H. Saier Jr. and J.T. Trevors, “Tell the Awful Truth: It’s Not Just Global Warming, It’s Global Disaster!” Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

10 Research Papers

Reviews: Piers Robinson, “The CNN Effect Revisited,” Critical Studies in Media Communication; June Feder, Ronald Levant, and James Dean, “Boys and Violence: A Gender-Informed Analysis,” Professional Psychology: Research and Practice

PART 3: Developing a Writing Process

11 Developing Ideas and Prewriting

12 Organizing and Drafting

13 Choosing a Style

15 Revising and Editing

PART 4: Strategies for Shaping Ideas

16 Drafting Introductions and Conclusions

17 Developing Paragraphs and Sections

18 Using Basic Rhetorical Patterns

19 Using Argumentative Strategies

20 Working Collaboratively with Other Writers

21 Starting Research

22 Finding Sources and Collecting Information

23 Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Citing Sources

24 Using MLA Style

25 Using APA Style

PART 6: Getting Your Ideas Out There

26 Using the Internet

27 Creating a Portfolio

28 Succeeding on Essay Exams

29 Presenting Your Work

5. Punctuation, Mechanics, and Spelling

About the Author(s)

Richard Johnson-Sheehan is a Professor of Rhetoric and Composition at Purdue University. At Purdue, he has directed the Introductory Composition program, and he has mentored new teachers of composition for many years. He teaches a variety of courses in composition, professional writing, and writing program administration, as well as classical rhetoric and the rhetoric of science. He has published widely in these areas. His prior books on writing include Technical Communication Today, now in its fourth edition, and Writing Proposals, now in its second edition. Professor Johnson-Sheehan was awarded 2008 Fellow of the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing and has been an officer in the Council for Writing Program Administrators.

Charles Paine is a Professor of English at the University of New Mexico, where he teaches undergraduate courses in first-year, intermediate, and professional writing as well as graduate courses in writing pedagogy, the history of rhetoric and composition, and other areas. At UNM, he directed the Rhetoric and Writing Program and the First-Year Writing Program. He is an active member of the Council of Writing Program Administrators and currently serves on its Executive Board. He cofounded and coordinates the Consortium for the Study of Writing in College, a joint effort of the National Survey of Student Engagement and the Council of Writing Program Administrators. The Consortium conducts general research into the ways that undergraduate writing can lead to enhanced learning, engagement, and other gains related to student success.

Cathi Shaw is a faculty member in the Departments of Communications and English at Okanagan College. Over the last ten years, she has taught technical, professional, and academic writing at Simon Fraser University, the University of British Columbia, and Okanagan College. Her research focus is on the development of voice and critical thinking in university and college student writers. She is a member of the Canadian Association for the Study of Discourse and Writing and the Canadian Authors Association.

Jordan Stouck is an Instructor of Composition at the University of British Columbia Okanagan. She has taught composition for the past decade at both UBC and the University of Lethbridge, and in 2007–2008 coordinated the University of Lethbridge’s Academic Writing Program. Her publications and presentations have focused on how discourse and language are context-driven. She is an active member of the Canadian Association for the Study of Discourse and Writing and of the Modern Languages Association.

I really like the simplicity with which concepts are explained. I think it’s easy to read without the addition of a lot of photos, which adds to the weight of the text.”

–Brigid Kelso, George Brown College

“Based on the samples, your textbook has the advantage of offering a section on the different types of argumentation. This enhances the coverage of rhetoric…[and] the introduction of genres as a way to get into the different kinds of writing and the different purposes of the genres is also an advantage.”

–Dat Tran, University of Ottawa

“There are a number of advantages of this new text. It is current, and uses current examples, in both text and graphics. The discussion of rhetorical modes, argumentation styles, and logical fallacies is excellent. And the way the text suggests how various genres can be explored, using these writing tools, seems very sensible and clear.”

–Tim Chamberlain, Camosun College

“I prefer the approach of this text to that of the one I used previously. The focus on Genres rather than Rhetorical Modes is better suited to the way we teach now. I also like the level of the discussion generally. The process sections are clear and thorough, and the academic standards/ expectations are high but achievable.”

“One advantage that these particular chapters have over the text I last used is that they address modern modes of communication, technologies and writing and reading contexts/situations.”

“Interesting story, with a multi-cultural, global focus. Haiti will continue to be current in our consciousness for some time to come. As well, it will be a “fresh” selection – very few, if any, students will have previously encountered this well written short story in other courses.”

–Timothy Chamberlain, Camosun College, review of “A Wall of Fire Rising” by Edwidge Danticat

“And on the whole, I found the [reading] selections to be interesting, accessible for students, and quite appropriate in their length. “

Writing Today

by Richard Johnson-Sheehan

With a clear and easy-to-read presentation, visual instruction, and pedagogical support, Writing Today is a practical and useful guide to writing in college and beyond.

With a clear and easy-to-read presentation, visual instruction, and pedagogical support, Writing Today is a practical and useful guide to writing in college and beyond.

Get a copy

Friends’ Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up .

Community Reviews

Michelle rated it really liked it

Erin rated it it was ok

Ray Ziemer rated it really liked it

Simple, short chapters.

Theme is by genre of writing, but adaptable to any approach. Recognizes writing process issues, of course.

DeVry uses it for both its freshman composition courses, so I hope to use it again when and if I teach the second. Read full review

Writing Today 3rd edition

032198465X

9780321984654

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0133944131 / 9780133944136 MyWritingLab with Pearson eText – Glue in Access Card 013394414X / 9780133944143 MyWritingLab with Pearson eText – Inside Star Sticker 032198465X / 9780321984654 Writing Today MyWritingLab is not a self-paced technology and should only be purchased when required by an instructor. Organized by genre–practical for college and career Accessible to students and flexible for instructors, Writing Today, Third Edition introduces students to the conventions of writing memoirs, profiles, literary analyses, arguments, research papers, and more. Each chapter features a step-by-step process for composing within a given genre, as well as exemplary student and professional readings to promote rhetorical knowledge and critical analysis. The 42 short chapters, the chunked writing style, and visual instruction work to ensure that students will transfer the skills and strategies practiced in your class to their other classes, their lives, and their careers. From its graphic “Quick Start Guides” to its “Write This” prompts, Writing Today challenges students to extend the boundaries of their writing abilities as they practice composing for the real world. Also available with MyWritingLab™ This title is also available with MyWritingLab — an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program designed to work with this text to engage students and improve results. Within its structured environment, students practice what they learn, test their understanding, and pursue a personalized study plan that helps them better absorb course material and understand difficult concepts.

Rent Writing Today 3rd edition (978-0321984654) today, or search our site for other textbooks by Richard Johnson-Sheehan. Every textbook comes with a 21-day “Any Reason” guarantee. Published by Pearson .

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Writing Today, Books a la Carte Edition, MLA Update Edition, 3rd Edition

Richard Johnson-Sheehan, Purdue University

Charles Paine, University of New Mexico

If You’re an Educator

If You’re a Student

Description

NOTE:В This edition features the same content as the traditional text in a convenient, three-hole-punched, loose-leaf version. Books a la Carte also offer a great value; this format costs significantly less than a new textbook. Before purchasing, check with your instructor or review your course syllabus to ensure that you select the correct ISBN. Several versions of Pearson’s MyLab & Mastering products exist for each title, including customized versions for individual schools, and registrations are not transferable. In addition, you may need a Course ID, provided by your instructor, to register for and use Pearson’s MyLab & Mastering products.

For courses in English Composition.

This version of Writing Today has been updated to reflect the 8th edition of the MLA Handbook (April 2016). The 8th edition introduces sweeping changes to the philosophy and details of MLA works cited entries. Responding to the “increasing mobility of texts,” MLA now encourages writers to focus on the process of crafting the citation, beginning with the same questions for any source. These changes, then, align with current best practices in the teaching of writing which privilege inquiry and critical thinking over rote recall and rule-following.

Accessible to students and flexible for instructors, Writing Today, Third Edition introduces students to the conventions of writing memoirs, profiles, literary analyses, arguments, research papers, and more. Each chapter features a step-by-step process for composing within a given genre, as well as exemplary student and professional readings to promote rhetorical knowledge and critical analysis. The 42 short chapters, the chunked writing style, and visual instruction work to ensure that students will transfer the skills and strategies practiced in your class to their other classes, their lives, and their careers. From its graphic “Quick Start Guides” to its “Write This” prompts, Writing Today challenges students to extend the boundaries of their writing abilities as they practice composing for the real world.

You can also purchase a loose-leaf print reference to complement Revel Writing Today . This is optional.

Writing Today, 3rd Edition

Richard Johnson-Sheehan, Purdue University

Charles Paine, University of New Mexico

If You’re an Educator

If You’re a Student

Organized by genre—practical for college and career

Accessible to students and flexible for instructors, Writing Today, Third Edition introduces students to the conventions of writing memoirs, profiles, literary analyses, arguments, research papers, and more.

From its graphic Quick Start Guides to its Write This prompts, this resource challenges students to extend the boundaries of their writing abilities as they practice composing for the real world.

Writing Today is fully integrated with MyWritingLab—an online homework, tutorial, and assessment program designed to work with this text to engage students and improve results. Low- and high-stakes writing exercises from the text can now be assigned, completed, and assessed in MyWritingLab.

Also available from Johnson-Sheehan & Paine! Argument Today—a refreshing approach to contemporary argument.

Explore Writing Today’s innovative approach to teaching writing.

Genre Know-how

Memoirs, argument papers, commentaries, reports, reviews, proposals, and research papers each follow their own patterns and conventions. Writing TodayВ teaches students genre know-how, giving themВ critical insight into a variety of rhetorical situationsВ while helping them use familiar patterns and conventions to achieve their purposes.

Genres as Generative Tools

Genres are not formulas to be followed mechanically but instead are dynamic social interactions between writers and readers. These ways of writing and speaking are flexible and ever evolving.В Writing Today approaches genre asВ the foundation from which all writing and speaking happens.В The elements of the writing process are built on this core concept of genre.

Scaffolding Writing Assignments

Multiple and detailed activities and exercises move students through the drafting, designing, and revising stages of writing. Sequencing writing assignments that grow over time from low- to high-stakes writing allow students to experience drafting and revision in ways that serve as a small-scale version of this authentic writing experience. Writing Today also encourages students to craft “microgenre” compositions as a step toward composing in the larger genre.

Instructive Visuals

Writing TodayВ includes informative visuals likeВ At a GlanceВ and theВ Quick Start GuideВ to help students understand and employ the conventions of genres.

To help students think like critical readers, the At a Glance illustrations appear early in the chapter and show the typical conventions of the genre examined in that chapter. To ease the transition from being readers into being writers of the genre, the Quick Start Guides offer specific, to-the-point guidance.

Additional Features & Unique Approach

Emphasize Critical Thinking Skills

  • “Designing the Text” and “Choosing an Appropriate Style.” Chapter opening vignettes launch the narrative of that chapter and identify its themes.
  • NEW | Each of the ten chapters in Part 2: Using Genres to Express Ideas now begins with anВ in-depth discussion of audience, purpose, and primary considerationsstudents should think about before writing in a particular genre.
  • NEW | Over twenty new “Readings” illustrate common organizations of each genre as well as relevant and engaging variations. “A Closer Look” follows each reading, encouraging students to analyze the rhetorical choices writers have made.
  • Compelling exercises encourage student engagement and offer instructors the opportunity to scaffold from short writing tasks to sustained longer compositions.
  • “Ideas for Writing” and “A Few Ideas for Composing” prompts offer opportunities to practice composing in the genre and to employ multimodal composing strategies.
  • At the close of every chapter, students have four opportunity to practice what they learned. “Talk About This” exercises prompt classroom discussion, especially in small groups. “Try This Out” exercises offer low-stakes and collaborative writing activities. “Explore This” activities encourage students to engage in independent practice. “Write This” prompts provide opportunities for formal writing and longer projects.
  • FlexibilityВ is a chief strength ofВ Writing Today.ВThe early chapters form a foundation, but remaining chapters can be taught in any order or combination to suit individual teaching approaches and objectives.

Review the table of contents below forВ Writing Today, Third EditionВ to gain a better understanding of the textbook’s organization and the topics covered in each chapter.В Chapter 1В andВ Chapter 5В are available for download as sample chapters in PDF format. You’ll needВ Acrobat ReaderВ to view the chapter.

PART 1: Getting Started

Chapter 2: Topic, Angle, Purpose

Chapter 3: Readers, Contexts, and Rhetorical Situations

Chapter 4: Reading Critically

PART 2: Using Genres to Express Ideas

Chapter 6: Profiles

Chapter 7: Reviews

Chapter 8: Literary Analyses

Chapter 9: Rhetorical Analyses

Chapter 10: Commentaries

Chapter 11: Arguments

Chapter 12: Proposals

Chapter 13: Analytical Reports

Chapter 14: Research Papers

PART 3: Developing A Writing Process

Chapter 15: Inventing Ideas and Prewriting

Chapter 16: Organizing and Drafting

Chapter 17: Choosing A Style

Chapter 18: Designing

Chapter 19: Revising and Editing

PART 4: Strategies For Shaping Ideas

Chapter 20: Developing Paragraphs and Sections

Chapter 21: Using Basic Rhetorical Patterns

Chapter 22: Using Argumentative Strategies

Chapter 23: Collaborating and Peer Response

PART 5: Doing Research

Chapter 24: Starting Research

Chapter 25: Finding Sources and Collecting Evidence

Chapter 26: Citing, Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing Sources

Chapter 27: Using MLA Style

Chapter 28: Using APA Style

PART 6: Getting Your Ideas Out There

Chapter 29: Writing with Social Networking

Chapter 30: Creating a Portfolio

Chapter 31: Succeeding on Written Exams and Assessment

Chapter 32: Presenting Your Work

PART 7: Anthology of Readings

Chapter 33: Memoirs

Chapter 34: Profiles

Chapter 35: Reviews

Chapter 36: Literary Analyses

Chapter 37: Rhetorical Analysis

Chapter 38: Commentaries

Chapter 39: Arguments

Chapter 40: Proposals

Chapter 41: Reports

Chapter 42: Research Papesr

PART 8: Handbook

Chapter 43: Sentences

Chapter 44: Verbs

Chapter 45: Pronouns

Chapter 46: Style

Chapter 47: Punctuation, Mechanics, and Spelling

Appendix: Readings Arranged by Theme

This material is protected under all copyright laws, as they currently exist. No portion of this material may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher.

MyWritingLab™

MyWritingLab can improve students’ writing by offering personalized and adaptive instruction, with integrated learning aids that foster student understanding of skills and ideas.

Writing at the Center

With the new composing space and Review Plan, MyWritingLab unites instructor comments and feedback on student writing with targeted remediation via rich multimedia activities, allowing students to learn from and through their own writing.

Writing Help for Varying Skill Levels

For students who enter the course under-prepared, MyWritingLab identifies those who lack prerequisite skills for composition-level topics, and provides personalized remediation.

Proven Results

No matter how MyWritingLab is used, instructors have access to powerful gradebook reports, which provide visual analytics that give insight to course performance at the student, section, or even program level.

Interactive eText

A completeВ eTextВ offers exact fidelity to the print text, personalization features such as highlighting, note taking and bookmarking, and full-text search. It also allows instructors to annotate the eText used by their students and links students to new interactive assignments, documents, and videos that will enrich their experiences with the text.

Interactive Student Papers

NEW | Interactive student papers encourage students to read like writers, to engage critically with a text, and to apply their insights to their own writing.

Video Assignments and Exercises from the Book

NEW | Video assignmentsВ ask students to respond to readings and synthesize material.

NEW | Low- and high-stakes writing exercises from the text can now be assigned, completed, and assessed in MyWritingLab, including the end-of-chapter “Try This Out,” “Explore This,” and “Write This” activities.

Engage students effectively with personalized content and tools.

Sample Chapters

Chapter 1 and Chapter 5 are available for download as sample chapters in PDF format.В You’ll needВ Acrobat ReaderВ to view the chapters.

Writing and Genres

This material is protected under all copyright laws, as they currently exist. No portion of this material may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, without permission in writing from the publisher.

The Authors

Richard Johnson-SheehanВ | Charles Paine

Richard Johnson-Sheehan

Richard Johnson-SheehanВ is a Professor of Rhetoric and Composition at Purdue University, where he is the Director of the Purdue Writing Lab.

He has also directed the Introductory Composition program (ICaP) and mentored new teachers of composition for many years. He teaches a variety of courses in composition, professional writing, and writing program administration, as well as classical rhetoric and the rhetoric of science. He has published widely in these areas. His books on writing include Writing Today, now in its third edition and co-authored with Charles Paine; Technical Communication Today, now in its fifth edition; and Technical Communication Strategies for Today and Writing Proposals, now in their second editions. Professor Johnson-Sheehan was awarded 2008 Fellow of the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing and has been an officer in the Council for Writing Program Administrators.

Writing Today, 2nd Edition

By Richard Johnson-Sheehan, Charles Paine

Published by Pearson

Published Date: Jan 2, 2012

Description

This text teaches how to transfer their writing skills to careers. By teaching kinds of writing (analyses, reports, proposals, etc.), strategies for writing (narration, comparison, argumentation, etc.), and processes for writing (planning, drafting, revising, etc.), Writing Today provides the writer with tools they can mix and match as needed to respond effectively to many writing situations.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Writing and Genres

What Are Genres?

Using Genres to Write Successfully

Genre and the Writing Process

Using Genres in College and Your Career

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 2: Topic, Angle, Purpose

Topic: What Am I Writing About?

Angle: What is New About the Topic?

Purpose: What Do I Want to Accomplish?

Choosing the Appropriate Genre

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 3: Readers, Contexts, and Rhetorical Situations

Analyzing the Context

Genres and the Rhetorical Situation

Quick Start Guide

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Part 2: Using Genres to Express Ideas

Chapter 4: Memoirs

*One Student’s Work: “Diving In” by Helen Sanderson

Inventing Your Memoir’s Content

Organizing and Drafting Your Memoir

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Memoir

Revising and Editing Your Memoir

MicroGenre: The Literacy Narrative

Frederick Douglass, “Learning to Read and Write”from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This, Exploring Other Microgenres

Chapter 5: Profiles

One Student’s Work: “Brother, Life Coach, Friend: Troubled Kids Turn Their Lives Around” by Katie Koch

Inventing You Profile’s Content

Organizing and Drafting Your Profile

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Profile

Revising and Editing Your Profile

MicroGenre: The Bio

*About John Charles Cook

Quick Start Guide

Jennifer Senior, “The Near-Fame Experience”

*Walter Kirn, “The Grand Canyon: A Whole New World”

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This, MicroGenre: The Resume

Chapter 6: Reviews

*One Student’s Work: “’Toy Story 3’ Is An Adult’s Film for Children” by Yair Rosenberg

Inventing Your Review’s Content

Organizing and Drafting Your Review

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Review

Revising and Editing Your Review

MicroGenre: The Rave

*Francois Marchand, “Review: The Black Keys shake up the Orpheum in Vancouver”

Quick Start Guide

Carina Chocano, “Long Overdue: Review of Movie Juno”

Gerard Jones, “Violent Media is Good for Kids”

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This, Exploring Other Microgenres

Chapter 7: Literary Analyses

One Student’s Work: “Doing the Right Thing in Edwidge Danticat’s ‘A Wall of Fire Rising’”by Nick Baca

Inventing Your Literary Analysis’ Content

Organizing and Drafting Your Literary Analysis

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Literary Analysis

Revising and Editing Your Literary Analysis

MicroGenre: The Reading Response

*Student Reading Response to Paul Laurence Dunbar’s “We Wear the Mask”

Quick Start Guide

A Casebook on Edwidge Danticat

Edwidge Danticat, “A Wall of Fire Rising”

*Corine Milano, “Edwidge Danticat: Return to Haiti”

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This, Exploring Other Microgenres

Chapter 8: Rhetorical Analyses

One Student’s Work: “Rhetorical Analysis of the Keep America Beautiful Public Service Announcement (1971)” by Wes Rodenburg

Inventing Your Rhetorical Analysis’ Content

Organizing and Drafting Your Rhetorical Analysis

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Rhetorical Analysis

Revising and Editing Your Rhetorical Analysis

MicroGenre: The Ad Critique

*Theo Keith, “Chrysler’s Super Bowl ad sells Detroit”

Quick Start Guide

Jack Shafer, “How Obama Does That Thing He Does”

Liza Featherstone, “What’s a Girl to Read?”

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This, Exploring Other Microgenres

Chapter 9: Commentaries

One Student’s Work: “Why My Generation Doesn’t Care About Performance Enhancement” by David Meany

Inventing You Commentary’s Content

Organizing and Drafting Your Commentary

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Commentary

Revising and Editing Your Commentary

MicroGenre: The Letter to the Editor

Michael Spatz, “Why I’m Against the Statewide Smoking Ban”

Quick Start Guide

*Douglas Rushkoff, “Are Jobs Obsolete?”

*Tony Blair, “Faith in a Globalized Age.”

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This, Exploring Other Microgenres

Chapter 10: Arguments

One Student’s Work: “Allowing Guns on Campus will Prevent Shootings, Rape” by Tyler Ohmann

Inventing Your Argument’s Content

Organizing and Drafting Your Argument

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Argument

Revising and Editing Your Argument

MicroGenre: The Rebuttal

Russ Walker and David Roberts, “Letter to the Editor on Climate Story”

Quick Start Guide

Sam Harris, “In Defense of Torture”

Kate Dailey, “Friends with Benefits: Do Facebook Friends Provide The Same Support As Those In Real Life?”

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This, Exploring Other Microgenres

Chapter 11: Proposals

*One Student Group’s Work: “SCC Café Proposal” by The Associated Students of the University of Washington (Seattle Campus)

Inventing Your Proposal’s Content

Organizing and Drafting Your Proposal

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Proposal

Revising and Editing Your Proposal

MicroGenre: The Pitch

*Dave Chenell and Eric Cleckner, “Elevator Pitch: graFighters”

Quick Start Guide

*John R. Gerdy, “For True Reform, Athletic Scholarships Must Go”

Alfie Kohn, “From Degrading to De-Grading”

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This, Exploring Other Microgenres

Chapter 12: Reports

One Student’s Work: Scott Walker, “Gender Stereotypes and Toys: Is it Nature or Nurture?”

Inventing Your Report’s Content

Organizing and Drafting Your Report

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Report

Revising and Editing Your Report

MicroGenre: The Explainer

*“Planking: What is it and Why it is Popular”

Quick Start Guide

*Andrew Gelman and George A. Romero, “How Many Zombies Do You Know? Using Indirect Survey Methods to Measure Alien Attacks and Outbreaks of the Undead”

American Psychological Association (APA), “Report of the APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls.”

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This, Exploring Other Microgenres

Chapter 13: Research Papers

One Student’s Work: “Lives Not Worth the Money?” by Katelyn Turnbow

Inventing Your Research Paper’s Content

Organizing and Drafting Your Research Paper

Choosing an Appropriate Style

Designing Your Research Paper

Revising and Editing Your Research Paper

MicroGenre: The Annotated Bibliography

*Sara Rodriguez, “Annotated Bibliography: The Fog of Revolution”

Quick Start Guide

*James Knoll, “Serial Murder: A Forensic Psychiatric Perspective”

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This, Exploring Other Microgenres

Part 3: Developing A Writing Process

Chapter 14: Inventing Ideas and Pre-Writing

Taking Time to Invent and Prewrite

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 15: Organizing and Drafting

Using Genres to Organize Your Ideas

Sketching an Outline

Drafting Through Writer’s Block

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 16: Choosing A Style

Writing in Plain Style

Establishing Your Voice

Writing Descriptively with Tropes

Improving Your Writing Style

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 17: Designing

Before You Begin Designing

Five Basic Principles of Design

Design Principle 1: Balance

Design Principle 2: Alignment

Design Principle 3: Grouping

Design Principle 4: Consistency

Design Principle 5: Contrast

Using Photography and Images

Using Graphs and Charts

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 18: Revising and Editing

Level 1: Global Revision

Level 2: Substantive Editing

Level 3: Copyediting

Level 4: Proofreading

Peer Review: Asking For Advice

Quick Start Guide

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Part 4: Strategies for Shaping Ideas

Chapter 19: Drafting Introductions and Conclusions

Quick Start Guide

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Chapter 20: Developing Paragraphs and Sections

Creating a Basic Paragraph

Getting Paragraphs to Flow (Cohesion)

Organizing a Section

Using Sections and Paragraphs Together

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 21: Using Basic Rhetorical Patterns

Cause and Effect

Comparison and Contrast

Combining Rhetorical Patterns

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 22: Using Argumentative Strategies

What is Arguable?

Using Reason, Authority, and Emotion

Avoiding Logical Fallacies

Rebuttals and Refutations

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 23: Working Collaboratively with Other Writers

Working with a Group of Other Writers

Working with a Team

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 24: Starting Research

Starting Your Research Process

Doing Start-Up Research

Assessing a Source’s Reliability

Managing Your Research Process

Following and Modifying Your Research Plan

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 25: Finding Sources and Collecting Information

Using Primary and Secondary Sources

Finding Electronic and Online Sources

Finding Print Sources

Using Empirical Sources

Developing an Annotated Bibliography

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 26: Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Citing Sources

Common Knowledge: What You Don’t Need to Cite

Paraphrasing and Summarizes Sources

Framing Quotes, Paraphrases, and Summaries

Quick Start Guide

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Chapter 27: Using MLA Style

Preparing the List of Works Cited

Citing Sources in the List of Works Cited

A Student’s MLA Research Paper: Brian Naidus, “A Whole New World: A Background on the Life of the Freshwater Shark”

Chapter 28: Using APA Style

Preparing the List of References

Citing Sources in the List of References

A Student’s APA Research Paper: Austin Duus, “Assortative Mating and Income Inequality”

Part 6: Getting Your Ideas Out There

Chapter 29: Using the Internet

Is This Writing?

Creating a Social Networking Site

Starting Your Own Blog

Writing Articles for Wikis

Putting Videos and Podcasts on the Internet

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 30: Creating A Portfolio

Two Basic Kinds of Portfolios

Getting Started on Your Portfolio

Step One: Collecting Your Work

Step Two: Selecting the Appropriate Artifacts

Step Three: Reflecting on Your Work

Step Four: Presenting Your Materials

Creating an E-Portfolio

Keeping Your Portfolio Up to Date

Creating a Starter Resume

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 31: Succeeding on Essay Exams

Preparing for an Essay Exam

Starting Your Essay Exam

Answering an Essay Exam Question

Finishing Your Essay Exam

One Student’s Essay Exam

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Chapter 32: Presenting Your Work

Organizing Your Presentation’s Content

Designing Your Visual Aids

Delivering Your Presentation

Practicing and Rehearsing

Quick Start Guide

Talk About This, Try This Out, Write This

Part 7: Anthology of Readings

Chapter 33: Memoirs

M. Scott Momaday, “The Way to Rainy Mountain”

*Thomas Rogers, “The College Hazing That Changed My Life”

*Joe Wilkins, “Growing Up Hard”

Bich Minh Nguyen, “The Good Immigrant Student”

Chapter 34: Profiles

*Carl Wilkinson, “David Grohl and the Foo Fighters”

Thomas Lynch, “Bodies in Motion and at Rest”

Two Profiles of Griffith Park:

*City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks, General Information for Griffith Park

*Benjamin Percy, “Welcome to the Jungle”

Chapter 35: Reviews

Christine Schoefer, “Harry Potter's Girl Trouble.”

Stephen King, “Why We Crave Horror Movies”

*Heather Havrilesky, “’Hawaii Five-O’: This is What Hit TV Looks Like”

Jane Lampman, “‘Left Behind,’ a Virtual Battle for the Souls of Unbelievers”

Chapter 36: Literary Analyses

Kate Chopin, “The Story of an Hour” [short story]

Robert Frost, “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” [poem]

Steven Monte, “An Overview of ‘Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’”

Laura Miller, “Touched by a Vampire”

Chapter 37: Rhetorical Analyses

*Richard Nordquist, “Homer Simpson’s Figures of Speech”

Gary Sloan, “Sleuthing Patriotic Slogans”

Libby Copeland, “Shooting from the Hip, With a Smile to Boot”

Rebecca Feldmann, “Discovering the Truth: The Operation of Ethos in Anti-Smoking Advertising”

Chapter 38: Commentaries

Michael Bronski, “A Gay Man’s Case Against Gay Marriage”

*Ariel Levy, “Female Chauvinist Pigs”

Marci A. Hamilton, “Why Suing College Students for Illegal Music Downloading is Right”

Ken Harbaugh, “Challenging Veteran Stereotypes”

Chapter 39: Arguments

Barack Obama, “A More Perfect Union”

*Tracy Clark-Fory, “Reconsidering Match.com’s Sex Offender Ban”

*Jeffrey A. Miron and Elina Tetelbaum, “The Dangers of the Drinking Age”

Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, “The Making of a Divorce Culture”

Chapter 40: Proposals

Julia Whitty, “Diet for a Warm Planet”

Carrie Lukas, “Who Pays for My Time Off?”

Jonathan Swift, “A Modest Proposal”

*Jeffrey D. Sachs, “With 7 Billion on Earth, a Huge Task Before Us”

Chapter 41: Reports

SAMHSA, “Underage Alcohol Use Among Full-Time College Students”

*Samuel Axon, “7 Days on Craigslist’s Casual Encounters”

*Jennifer A. Carithers-Thomas, Shelley H. Bradford, Christopher M. Keshock, Steven F. Pugh, “Freshman Fifteen: Fact or Fiction?”

*Jaime C. Confer, Carin Perilloux, David M. Buss, “More Than Just a Pretty Face”

Chapter 42: Research Papers

*Alyssa Battistoni, “The Public Overwhelmingly Wants It: Why Is Taxing the Rich So Hard?”

*Chris Mooney, “Rapture Ready: The Science of Self Delusion”

*Henry M. Morris, “Insufficient Design”

*Tim M. Berra, “Charles Darwin’s Paradigm Shift”

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