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The 5 Best Writing Classes NYC Has To Offer

Fiction is perhaps the purest form of storytelling. A tale is told with only words and the reader’s imagination. In this class, you’ll gain a firm grounding in all the basics of fiction writing, write 1-2 short stories, and perform an assortment of writing exercises to develop new ideas and overcome writers block. Fiction I is for beginners or anyone who wants to brush up on the fundamentals.

This course is for students who have a strong knowledge of grammar and sentence structure and are eager to further their writing skills for a business or academic setting. The emphasis in this course will be on nonfiction, such as research papers, essays, position papers, and business letters.

In this workshop-based course, students are encouraged to further explore their relationship with nature. Through selected readings and weekly writing exercises and discussions, both novice and experienced writers craft their own stories, poems, and essays about or inspired by the natural world. No prior writing or botanical experience required.

Are you working on a memoir, poem, or story and looking for some friendly feedback? Maybe you just want to put pen to paper and see what happens. Join this workshop for writing and sharing work in a supportive and respectful environment. Writers are given the freedom to find and strengthen their individual and unique voices as well as to experiment with form, style and new genres. Open to writers of all genres — poetry, fiction, memoir, and anything else — and even to those who think they’ve never written before. No prior writing experience is necessary.

In this six week workshop, you’ll learn everything you need to know to cultivate a rich writing experience for yourself to produce quality work. Through exercises and lectures, you’ll learn strategies for finding new ideas, techniques for bringing your words to life, and find a voice unique to you. You’ll receive weekly feedback from your instructor as well as other students in a completely supportive and no-pressure environment.

Classes Starting Now

The Art of Craft

We teach the craft of writing in a way that is clear, practical, and inspiring. Explore our wide variety of courses for adults and teens, as well as our One-on-One options. New classes are starting all the time, in NYC and Online.

How to Get Published

Here you will learn how to navigate the ins-and-outs of the publishing business and you’ll write (and refine) the most important selling tool for your book—the query letter. All under the guidance of an established literary agent.

A Very Short Story Contest

The story goes that Ernest Hemingway won a bet by writing a short story that ran fewer than ten words. We would like to make a similar bet with you. Write a great short story in ten words or fewer.

Spring Classes

Spring classes are now available for enrollment, both in NYC and online.

Stay Connected

Sign up for our email list to receive writing advice, news, and special deals. We promise to send you great content that enlightens and brightens your day.

Student Success

Your writing classes helped me to move from being a multiple rejectee to an internationally published author (fourteen languages, twenty-one publishers to be precise).

Do you wish there was a place you could go for writing inspiration and practice? Where you could hang out with other writers? Without needing to make a long-term commitment or spend a lot of money? With food and drink involved?

Gotham Write-Ins are that place.

Corporate Classes

Gotham brings its world-renowned teaching right into your workplace with our Corporate Classes. We come, we teach, you benefit.

Options include Business Writing, Grammar, and Corporate Creativity.

All of Gotham’s in-person writing classes take place in New York City.

NYC writing classes meet on a weekly basis (with the exception of one-session classes and some Teen classes). You interact with the same teacher and students each time, forming a writing group that grows in camaraderie, session by session.

No more than 14 writers are allowed in a Gotham NYC class, so that all students get personal attention. (Intensives and community events, though, often contain larger groups.)

Explore our catalogue of writing courses. And here you will find information on Gotham’s various class formats and our teaching philosophy.

Here are the locations used for our NYC writing classes.

While the majority of NYC students live in or nearby NYC, you will also see students from far and wide who are spending time in the area. This is especially true of our One-day Intensives, which frequently draw students from all over the world. If you’re visiting NYC, here is some info on NYC hotels.

We also offer Free Events in NYC. Here’s a video of one of our free classes in Bryant Park.

Writing Classes New York

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Writing Classes Coming up in New York

555 8th Ave Ste 1402, New York, New York 10018

Do you wish there was a place you could go for writing inspiration and practice? Where you could hang out with other writers? Without needing to make a long-term commitment or spend a lot of money? Gotham Write-Ins are that place. Here’s what happens. The teacher gives an interesting writing prompt. Everyone writes for a while. Then, those who.

Friday Mar 23rd, 6:30pm

Grammar Essentials

185 Madison Ave Ste 1104, New York, New York 10016

Grammar Essentials Training Overview You learned the rules of grammar in school, but now you’d like to refresh and refine your grammar usage for your professional life. You need to articulate your ideas clearly and succinctly in written communications and present yourself in a professional manner. In this course, you will review the rules of grammar.

Creative Writing Classes New York

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555 8th Ave Ste 1402, New York, New York 10018

Do you wish there was a place you could go for writing inspiration and practice? Where you could hang out with other writers? Without needing to make a long-term commitment or spend a lot of money? Gotham Write-Ins are that place. Here’s what happens. The teacher gives an interesting writing prompt. Everyone writes for a while. Then, those who.

Friday Mar 23rd, 6:30pm

Creative Writing 101 Level 1: 6 Week Class

1450 Broadway, New York, New York 10001

Are you eager to test the waters of creative writing but not sure where to start, or how? Have you written previously but been away for a while and hope to dip back in? Here you will be guided surely and safely into the writing life. There’s no pressure to work on a specific project or even settle on which type of creative writing you prefer. The.

Tuesday Apr 10th, 7pm

this class meets 6 times

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Creative Writing 101 One Day Intensive

1450 Broadway, New York, New York 10001

Are you eager to test the waters of creative writing but not sure where to start, or how? Have you written previously but been away for a while and hope to dip back in? Here you will be guided surely and safely into the writing life. There’s no pressure to work on a specific project or even settle on which type of creative writing you prefer. The.

Saturday Apr 7th, 11am

Fiction Writing Level 1 One Day Intensive

555 8th Ave Ste 1402, New York, New York 10018

Fiction is a wonderful conjuring act. With only words and the reader’s imagination, a work of fiction can sail across the world in pursuit of a whale, or time-travel to another dimension, or zero in on a few minutes in line at the local bank, enveloping the reader in a made-up story that feels real. To pull off this feat requires a balance.

Friday Apr 6th, 10am

Children’s Book Writing One Day Intensive

1450 Broadway, New York, New York 10001

The quiet magic of Goodnight Moon grows into the zaniness of Dr. Seuss and widens into the dazzlement of Harry Potter then matures into the straight talk of Judy Blume and the gritty reality of The Outsiders. Such is the amazing journey children take through books. These stories are a treasured part of childhood and they linger for a lifetime. To.

Saturday Apr 7th, 11am

Creative Writing

244 W 54th St, New York, New York 10019

They say everyone has a story and this new writing class with Irish novelist Yvonne Cassidy will help you tell yours. Over the course of eight weeks, Yvonne will work with you to develop your story while you discover the fundamental tools of the craft of creative writing. Whether you want to write fiction, memoir, or about the lives of your Irish ancestors.

Writing workshops nyc

About NY Writers Coalition

NY Writers Coalition Inc. (NYWC) is one of the largest community-based creative writing programs in the world. We partner with public and private institutions, social service agencies, and social justice organizations to provide unique, empowering ongoing weekly creative writing workshops throughout New York City. Our workshops are particularly targeted toward underserved people, including youth, seniors, women, LGBT communities, people living with disabilities, people who are incarcerated or formerly incarcerated, or others with specialized needs. Writers participate in NYWC’s readings and their work is published in NYWC’s high-quality publications.

Since we launched in 2002, more than 12,000 NYWC workshop participants have been served in hundreds of New York City locations. Our workshop members have been widely published, been accepted to prestigious high schools and universities, and have had work presented in Carnegie Hall, in the NY Times, on NPR, and in major venues across NYC.

NYWC also offers other free and low cost workshops and events that are open to everyone. We welcome writers of all genres and experience levels. Our work has deep roots in the Amherst Writers and Artists writing workshop method, created by Pat Schneider and described in her book Writing Alone and With Others. Click through our website to learn more about NYWC’s public programs, annual Write-A-Thon, current drop-in workshop schedule, and NYWC Press publications.

Public Workshops

Put pen to paper and see what happens. Join NY Writers Coalition for a free, drop-in writing workshop available to the general public. These writing groups are open to writers of all genres – poetry, fiction, memoir, and anything else – and even to those who think they’re not writers! Writing supplies will be provided, so just bring yourself. Writers of all backgrounds, genres, and experiences levels are welcome. No advance sign-up is required unless otherwise stated.

These workshops focus on generating new writing in a supportive environment. Each week your workshop leader will supply writing prompts, but feel free to ignore the prompt, and write on your own. You are invited to share what you have written during the session, but this is not a requirement. To ensure that everyone in your writing group is on equal footing, please do not bring previously written manuscripts to be critiqued. Learn more about NYWC’s workshop method here.

Saturdays @ 2:00-4:00 p.m.

NOTE: This workshop meets biweekly. Contact library for dates.

NOTE: This workshop meets biweekly. Contact library for dates.

Mondays @ 3:00-5:00 p.m.

Tuesdays @ 6:00-8:00 p.m.

NOTE: This is a bilingual (Spanish/English) workshop, but all are welcome.

Fridays @ 2:45-3:45 p.m. for kids (ages 5-12).

Fridays @ 4:15-5:15 p.m. for teens (ages 13-18).

Mondays @ 3:30-5:00 p.m.

NY Transit Museum (Boerum Pl & Schermerhorm St)

Tuesdays @ 2:00-4:00 p.m.

Thursdays @ 6:00-8:00 p.m.

NOTE: This is a self-care workshop for people of color. Find out more information here. Sign up is required.

Black Revolutionary Literature (Fort Greene, Brooklyn)

NOTE: This workshop has a $50 registration fee and will be record, so participation consent is required. Find out more information here. Sign up is required.

Andrew Heiskell Braille & Talking Book Library (40 West 20th Street, Chelsea / Flatiron)

Saturdays @ 2:00-3:30 p.m.

NOTE: This is a workshop for individuals who are blind or visually impaired, but all are welcome.

NOTE: This workshop meets biweekly. Contact library for dates.

Writing workshops nyc

Books by Sackett Street alumni have been translated into 17 languages, won numerous awards, and made bestseller lists nationwide.

In 2002, I graduated from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and moved to Brooklyn, where I found myself pining for a community of enthusiastic writers and readers. I placed an ad on Craigslist, and the very first group of Sackett Street writers climbed the three floors to my brownstone apartment kitchen.

They were hard-working writers and passionate readers, but they were also accountants and copywriters and stay-at-home-parents and industrial engineers. As I filled class after class (many with returning students who still participate today), I realized that great writers were everywhere—not just at MFA programs and literary conferences.

Word spread that Sackett Street was a salon-like workshop with small classes, an intimate environment, dedicated instructors and motivated students. 14 years later, over 3,500 writers have studied with us. 630 have gone on to more than 85 MFA in Creative Writing programs , and alumni have published more than 150 books at big houses and independent presses.

NYC is full of great writers. Come join them at Sackett Street.

We are thrilled to offer our craft-focused workshops to talented writers outside NYC through our ONLINE classes. Because great writers live in every corner of the world.

Writing workshops nyc

You don’t need a single class, workshop, or degree to become a writer. Deciding whether you want to pursue your writing career in the trenches of the publishing industry, develop on your own, or enroll in an MFA course is one of the big decisions every writer gets to make for themselves. But everybody needs a little help now and then, which is why it’s good that there’s all kinds of no-pressure writing classes and workshops in New York. These can provide a sounding board for works in progress, introduce you to experienced novelists, or offer exposure to the life of a professional writer. Below are a few of the best writing classes you can join in New York.

Catapult has acquired a sterling reputation in recent years as an independent book publisher and is dedicated to launching writing that’s off the beaten track, unique, and reader/writer-friendly. An affordable alternative to high-price university programs, Catapult’s repertoire of classes offer award-winning workshops given by writers such as Michele Filgate (currently teaching “Building a Writing Career on the Internet”) and Rebecca Schiff (“Making Each Sentence Count”), all given at the publisher’s New York City offices for a flat fee, with small classes ranging in size from just five to eight students.

Sackett Street

One of New York’s most famous workshops is still the best. In the last 14 years, the Sackett Street Writers’ Workshop has launched some 3,500 writers and their alumni have published more than 85 books. Available in-person or online, Sackett Street is the one of the best substitutes to an MFA in the city.

The Center For Fiction

As one of the central arteries of NY literary culture, The Center For Fiction knows that a fledgling writer can feel intimidated by the challenges of writing or overwhelmed by the numerous opportunities that confront them. That’s why they offer intimate classes with award-winning authors in their sky-lit Writers’ Studio, as well as access to their stunning 85,000-volume library for all students.

© The Center For Fiction

Gotham Writers’ Workshop

You’ve probably seen flyers for the Gotham Writers Workshop before. There’s a good reason that they’re so well-known, too. They specialize in reading, responding to, and promoting the work of writers at every stage in their evolution, with new classes opening all the time. Consummately affordable and offering everything from fiction and nonfiction to comedy writing and screenwriting, Gotham is the city’s premiere writing workshop.

The Writers’ Studio New York

Poets in particular might want to consider The Writers’ Studio, founded in 1987 by Philip Schultz, a Pulitzer-Prize-winning poet. Informal classes in Brooklyn and Manhattan work to establish trust between students, giving them an immediate community with which to work throughout their careers. Unlike some courses, The Writers’ Studio begins with a Level I class that establishes a common foundation before moving on to other levels of skill, making it a readymade progression that admits amateurs and releases them as professionals.

Cooper Union

The Cooper Union Summer Writing Program takes a unique approach to writing, offering students a three-week course between high school and college that promises to instill essential essay-writing and textual-analysis skills that bridge the gap between entry-level and university-level argument-driven writing. Classes are offered in July for a current fee of $2,500, with an online option for $1,400.

92 nd Street Y

The 92 nd Street Y is a cultural landmark and they offer open-enrollment courses (with scholarships) for memoirists, critics, poets, and fiction-writers. Offered through the Unterberg Poetry Center, these classes offer the fundamentals of writing both for teens and for advanced students year-round.

Feeling a sense of loss is central to the writing experience no matter what your background, and Lost Lit, based in Brooklyn’s Boerum Hill, combines questions of identity and place with the passionate pursuit of literature. Founded by Lynne Connor, they emphasize work by writers who feel left out of the current literary environment and work to nurture their sense of voice through intensive, informal workshops that offer specialty classes in writing from grief and “adoption”, meaning those who write to reclaim their identity in unfamiliar surroundings.

My First Gotham Writing Class

Being a new member of the real world (I just graduated college last year), I have been trying to find ways to keep my interests alive. I no longer have my school newspaper or club basketball team to meet new people and enjoy my hobbies. So, I decided to take a writing class in NYC. After weeks of researching different programs, I decided to take a Fictional Writing course at Gotham Writing.

I showed up to the class 30 minutes early, as they had instructed. It was being held in a high school classroom, so I eased myself into the small, wooden chair that I had forgotten about many years ago. People started to trickle in, and I was surprised to see all different kinds of people. First, there was an older woman who wouldn’t look at me when I said “hello” — typical New York. Then, a couple of younger Indian girls trickled in, some middle-aged men who looked completely disheveled (who were probably real writers), and one guy that was in a suit. There was also a larger black woman that limped as she walked and made all kinds of noises as she sat down. No one seemed to know each other, or care to meet one another. They came in with their heads down and found the closest open seat.

Just as everyone sat down, our teacher finally came into the room. She wrote her name on the chalk board just like our substitute teachers used to do when we were in grade school. She was an older woman that looked like she had nothing to do with being a creative writer. Immediately, though, she let us know her history — which was that she had a book published by Penguin a few years ago and has since become a judge on almost every writing contest you can think of. We immediately respected her.

Our teacher first took us through a few basic exercises, where she would say a phrase and we would have to write about it. For example, “I knew I was in trouble when.” If we so desired, we could read aloud to the class. If not, we could simply move on to the next exercise. We went over plot, character, description and the art of actually getting published. She had a packet of information to go from, and everything was organized nicely. I couldn’t help wondering throughout the whole class, though, “Was this really worth my entire Saturday and $150 of my entry-level salary?”

In the end, I realized that it was my classmates’ dialogue that I really got something out of. While everyone walked in seeming as though they had nothing to say, mere minutes into the class showed that everyone came prepared to converse. We were asked to introduce ourselves and where we were at in our writing career. One of the older women told us that she was thinking about retiring to become a writer, and wanted to learn a few more skills. The guy in the suit told us that he was an advertising planner at an agency and just looking to make some quick money with writing (we all quickly led him away from that notion). And the black woman who was making all kinds of noises when she entered told us that she had a serious health scare last year and now has to walk with a limp and remind herself how important every single day is. There were song writers, nurses, novelists, and unemployed people mixed together, and we all seemed to have the same desire to learn the basics.

Here a few notes I walked away with:

The Preferred Length

  • Novel: 300-350 pages
  • Short Story: 15-20 pages

Habits of Highly Successful Writers

  • Create a schedule: make a habit of it. Our teacher told us that she gets up at 5 a.m. every day so that she can write uninterrupted by her day.
  • Write about what’s important to you. What do you stay up late at night thinking about?
  • Dream about the potential. If you can’t dream it, you can’t achieve it.
  • Read, Read, Read. For every hour you spend writing, you should be reading for 30 minutes. You have to learn from those before you.

Exercise to Try at Home:

  • Take a book that you love and appreciate the way it was written — something that you flew through and could follow easily. Then, dissect that novel by creating a notecard for each chapter of that book. Write what happened so that you could follow the succession of events by flipping through the notecards.
  • Then, when you go to write your own novel, you have an idea of how much should happen in each chapter. “There’s no need to recreate the wheel.”

Overall, I would highly recommend spending your time in a writing class if it’s something you’re interested in doing. While the class felt boring at times (and honestly, I wondered why I signed up to be in school on the weekend), I learned more than I realized at the time. Now that I spend my time doing these exercises and reading constantly, I am continually reminded of the information and tips I picked up in that class. I learned new people, cultivated my passion and learned something in the process.

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