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Young Goodman Brown

Nathaniel Hawthorne

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The Weakness of Public Morality

In “Young Goodman Brown,” Hawthorne reveals what he sees as the corruptibility that results from Puritan society’s emphasis on public morality, which often weakens private religious faith. Although Goodman Brown has decided to come into the forest and meet with the devil, he still hides when he sees Goody Cloyse and hears the minister and Deacon Gookin. He seems more concerned with how his faith appears to other people than with the fact that he has decided to meet with the devil. Goodman Brown’s religious convictions are rooted in his belief that those around him are also religious. This kind of faith, which depends so much on other people’s views, is easily weakened. When Goodman Brown discovers that his father, grandfather, Goody Cloyse, the minister, Deacon Gookin, and Faith are all in league with the devil, Goodman Brown quickly decides that he might as well do the same. Hawthorne seems to suggest that the danger of basing a society on moral principles and religious faith lies in the fact that members of the society do not arrive at their own moral decisions. When they copy the beliefs of the people around them, their faith becomes weak and rootless.

The Inevitable Loss of Innocence

Goodman Brown loses his innocence because of his inherent corruptibility, which suggests that whether the events in the forest were a dream or reality, the loss of his innocence was inevitable. Instead of being corrupted by some outside force, Goodman Brown makes a personal choice to go into the forest and meet with the devil; the choice was the true danger, and the devil only facilitates Goodman Brown’s fall. Goodman Brown is never certain whether the evil events of the night are real, but it does not matter. If they are a dream, then they come completely from Goodman Brown’s head—a clear indication of his inherent dark side. If they are real, then Goodman Brown has truly seen that everyone around him is corrupt, and he brought this realization upon himself through his excessive curiosity. Goodman Brown’s loss of innocence was inevitable, whether the events of the night were real or a dream.

The Fear of the Wilderness

From the moment he steps into the forest, Goodman Brown voices his fear of the wilderness, seeing the forest as a place where no good is possible. In this he echoes the dominant point of view of seventeenth-century Puritans, who believed that the wild New World was something to fear and then dominate. Goodman Brown, like other Puritans, associates the forest with the wild “Indians” and sees one hiding behind every tree. He believes that the devil could easily be present in such a place—and he eventually sees the devil himself, just as he had expected. He considers it a matter of family honor that his forefathers would never have walked in the forest for pleasure, and he is upset when the devil tells him that this was not the case. He himself is ashamed to be seen walking in the forest and hides when Goody Cloyse, the minister, and Deacon Gookin pass. The forest is characterized as devilish, frightening, and dark, and Goodman Brown is comfortable in it only after he has given in to evil.

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Young Goodman Brown Essay(Symbolism)

13 September 2011 “Young Goodman Brown” Analysis One of the factors that shaped the New World was religion; it was a pillar in the fledgling society and a reason for migration for so many Europeans. Puritanism was a major belief system that held strongly throughout the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. Nathaniel Hawthorne, a nineteenth century American novelist and short story writer, composed the story of “Young Goodman Brown” which takes place in Salem. All Puritans were to take a journey which was supposed to lead them to a conversion experience. This journey takes them through the spiritual heart. It is intended for self – examination; the elimination of the three vices: boredom, vice, and …show more content…

Symbolism in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay example

In Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” the use of symbols contributes to the development of the story’s plot. Symbolism is used as a means to uncover the truth about the characters. The author, in an attempt to manifest the moral aspects of his society, uses many kinds of symbols to support his points. When analyzing an allegory like “Young Goodman Brown”, the reader must realize that the story is in its entirety, a symbol. Hawthorne, through his writing is trying to convey the contradicting…

Symbolism and Allegory in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

The main characters in Hawthorne’s story “Young Goodman Brown” are Goodman Brown, his wife Faith and the stranger who accompanies Goodman Brown in the forest. At the beginning of the story Brown is bidding his wife, Faith farewell at their front door. Taking a lonely route into the forest, he meets an older man who bears a fatherly resemblance to both Brown and the Devil. Later that night Brown discovers to his amazement, that many exemplary villagers are on the same path including, Goody…

Symbolism in ?Young Goodman Brown? Essay

“Young Goodman Brown,” by Nathanial Hawthorne, is the story of one man’s journey to find himself. In it, Hawthorne uses many elements as symbols to add significance throughout the chronicle. The author does a good job of portraying some of the people and objects with symbols and allows the story to become more developed. Nathaniel Hawthorne uses many people as symbols throughout “Young Goodman Brown,” but the roles that are most symbolic are those of Goodman Brown and his wife Faith. Both of…

Symbols and Symbolism in Young Goodman Brown Essay

eternity. “Young Goodman Brown,” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, reveals a similar resemblance of the Biblical inherent evil among man, through a disturbing dream of a young Puritan man who journeys into evil and is forced to examine the nature of evil among the human race. The Wife of Goodman Brown symbolizes the love that a wife has for her beloved husband but also the love, faith and devotion that her husband Goodman Brown has in his Christian God. An example of this symbolism is when Goodman Brown says…

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Young Goodman Brown Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” is full of symbolism throughout the story. Perhaps the most interesting examples of symbolism include the title character, Young Goodman Brown, as well as his wife, Faith, and the woods that Young Goodman Brown enters on his journey. Included are many allusions to Christianity and also to evil and sin. These references are expressed mainly through characters and settings in the story. The…

The Symbolism of Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

The Symbolism of “Young Goodman Brown” Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story, “Young Goodman Brown,” shows the reader the author’s power as a symbolist. Frederick C. Crews in “The Logic of Compulsion in ‘Roger Malvin’s Burial’” explores the symbology that prevails in Hawthorne’s best short stories: . . . I chose this one tale to analyze because it illustrates the indispensability, and I should even say the priority, of understanding the literal psychological dramas…

Symbolism in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay examples

Nathaniel Hawthorne’s tale, “Young Goodman Brown,” is rich in symbolism, as this essay will amply illustrate. Hugo McPherson in “Hawthorne’s Use of Mythology” explains how the author’s “inner drama” may be expressed in his symbolism: The imaginative foundation of a writer’s work may well be an inner drama or ‘hidden life’ in which his deepest interests and conflicts are transformed into images or characters; and through the symbolic play of these creations, he comes to ‘know’ the meaning…

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Young Goodman Brown Nathaniel Hawthorne utilizes symbolism throughout his short story Young Goodman Brown to impact and clarify the theme of good people sometimes doing bad things. Hawthorne uses a variety of light and dark imagery, names, and people to illustrate irony and different translations. Young Goodman Brown is a story about a man who comes to terms with the reality that people are imperfect and flawed and then dies a bitter death from the enlightenment…

The Use of Symbolism in Young Goodman Brown Essay

“The Use of Symbolism in Young Goodman Brown” “Young Goodman Brown,” written by Nathaniel Hawthorne in 1835, is a short story about a man named young Goodman Brown who leaves his wife, Faith, to go on an errand into the woods with the devil. Faith begs Goodman Brown to not leave her alone, but he chooses to go anyways. This short story shows many signs of symbolism, such as the forest, the devil, the staff, the pink ribbons, Faith, sin, and guilt. These symbols help in understanding the story…

Young Goodman Brown Essay(Symbolism)

IBEnglish III 13 September 2011 “Young Goodman Brown” Analysis One of the factors that shaped the New World was religion; it was a pillar in the fledgling society and a reason for migration for so many Europeans. Puritanism was a major belief system that held strongly throughout the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. Nathaniel Hawthorne, a nineteenth century American novelist and short story writer, composed the story of “Young Goodman Brown” which takes place in Salem. All…

Young Goodman Brown Critical Essays

Nathaniel Hawthorne

Critical Evaluation

(Critical Survey of Literature for Students)

One of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s most anthologized tales, “Young Goodman Brown” shares themes and techniques with much of his other work. Hawthorne’s probing of what might be called the psychology of sin (however secular are modern readings), expressed through his characteristic manipulations of symbolism, merge the tale with his other short stories, such as “The Birth-Mark” (1843) and “Ethan Brand: A Chapter from an Abortive Romance” (1850), as well as his novels The Scarlet Letter (1850) and The Blithedale Romance, published in 1852. (Hawthorne’s short stories were written mostly before 1850, and his novels were written after that date.) Hawthorne’s ideas, moral vision, and artistry have established him as one of the nation’s greatest writers. The suggestive ambiguities in his fiction have made his work particularly amenable to treatment by the full range of modern critical perspectives.

The symbolic significance of places, times, names, and objects seems obvious in “Young Goodman Brown.” Salem is the dwelling place of family and community, religion and faith (“faith” the belief and “Faith” the woman). The name Goodman suggests “good man” (although it also had been an equivalent of “mister”). The surrounding wilderness is unknown, a place where one can easily wander from the straight and narrow path. In addition, the scenes in Salem occur during daylight, the scenes in the forest at night. In that dark forest, Brown discovers a prince of darkness (an apparent devil who looks like a man) who appears with his serpent cane as if he has been conjured into being by the word “devil.” Has Brown found in that darkness the light or the truth or an acceptable moral standard in that heathen wilderness? Does he remain a naive yet good man?

“Young Goodman Brown” is not, in fact, a simple religious parable about the undeniable evils of life. The statement that “evil is the nature of mankind,” after all, is spoken by the Devil (the prince of lies as well as the prince of darkness) in what may have been only Brown’s dream. “Young Goodman Brown” is a psychological tale about the impact of this partial truth upon a particularly susceptible mind. If this were not the case, Hawthorne need not have written the final page of the story nor have portrayed Brown in such a negative fashion. Should not the discoverer of truth be rewarded with a positive outcome? Hawthorne does not focus on universal evil or human hypocrisy. Rather, he criticizes Brown as an either/or thinker who never acknowledges the evil in himself. His own diabolical curiosity initially leads him to his appointment in the forest. The devil looks like Brown. After Brown exclaims “my Faith is gone!” he himself becomes “the chief horror of the scene.”

Initially, Brown seems aware that his mission is sinful, but eventually he perceives sin only in others. He becomes blind to goodness and avoids human contact. Like so many Hawthorne characters, he becomes a cold observer of life rather than a life-affirming participant. His sin is pride. As the story opens, he is innocent, young, and sheltered. He knows only good. When he sees Faith in the forest, however, he abruptly converts to a belief that only evil exists. Either attitude is simpleminded. He never envisions a complex life that is a mix of good and evil and which in any case must be lived.

What troubles Brown most in the nocturnal forest is “that the good shrank not from the wicked.” Even the pink of Faith’s ribbons is a mixture of white (purity) and red (associated with guilt and sin in the story). Brown’s propensity to think in terms of God or Satan, the flesh or the spirit, and good or evil has been described as typical of early Puritan New England. In this sense, Hawthorne has written a criticism of society like that of The Scarlet Letter.

Modern critics have interpreted “Young Goodman Brown” in many ways. The story as a critique of society stands out to some. To psychologically inclined readers, Brown journeys into the psyche. The village represents the superego, whereas the forest and darkness become equivalents of the Freudian id. The entire story becomes a portrait of one human mind that discovers the usually suppressed and disquieting reality of animal instinct.

Gender-conscious readers might see Brown’s problem as an inability to accommodate to women as complex individuals. He cannot reconcile the “red” fact of menstrual cycles with the “white” of hallowed motherhood. Faith’s own reality is “pink,” a color that for Brown can only mean a tainting of purity. Brown either “shrank from the bosom of Faith” for her supposedly evil nature or indulged his sexual appetites—since they do have a number of children. Readers may view “Young Goodman Brown” as literary self-revelation, because to write the story, Hawthorne had to distance himself, to observe the human lot just as Brown did. All these perspectives testify to the richness of the story.

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Young Goodman Brown Homework Help Questions

I think the principal reason for the massive change in Goodman Brown’s personality is the way in which the people he has thought he could have massive trust in have been shown to be in league with.

Both the names Goodman Brown and Faith are symbolic of innocence and purity. Goodman is a surname similar to using Mr. in today’s society. Referring to a man as "Goodman" also meant.

The main message of the story Young Goodman Brown, by Nathaniel Hawthorne, is the fight between good and evil under the scope of detouring from one’s faith and succumbing to the evils of life.

This is a fairly big question — broadly considered, diction means word choice, and author’s obviously choose thousands of words when they write stories. What you are actually being asked to.

“Young Goodman Brown” is told from a third person point of view. It starts with a third person limited, describing Goodman Brown as if observing him objectively from the outside: ” YOUNG GOODMAN.

Young Goodman Brown Essay(Symbolism)

13 September 2011 “Young Goodman Brown” Analysis One of the factors that shaped the New World was religion; it was a pillar in the fledgling society and a reason for migration for so many Europeans. Puritanism was a major belief system that held strongly throughout the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. Nathaniel Hawthorne, a nineteenth century American novelist and short story writer, composed the story of “Young Goodman Brown” which takes place in Salem. All Puritans were to take a journey which was supposed to lead them to a conversion experience. This journey takes them through the spiritual heart. It is intended for self – examination; the elimination of the three vices: boredom, vice, and …show more content…

Symbolism in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay example

In Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” the use of symbols contributes to the development of the story’s plot. Symbolism is used as a means to uncover the truth about the characters. The author, in an attempt to manifest the moral aspects of his society, uses many kinds of symbols to support his points. When analyzing an allegory like “Young Goodman Brown”, the reader must realize that the story is in its entirety, a symbol. Hawthorne, through his writing is trying to convey the contradicting…

Symbolism and Allegory in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

The main characters in Hawthorne’s story “Young Goodman Brown” are Goodman Brown, his wife Faith and the stranger who accompanies Goodman Brown in the forest. At the beginning of the story Brown is bidding his wife, Faith farewell at their front door. Taking a lonely route into the forest, he meets an older man who bears a fatherly resemblance to both Brown and the Devil. Later that night Brown discovers to his amazement, that many exemplary villagers are on the same path including, Goody…

Symbolism in ?Young Goodman Brown? Essay

“Young Goodman Brown,” by Nathanial Hawthorne, is the story of one man’s journey to find himself. In it, Hawthorne uses many elements as symbols to add significance throughout the chronicle. The author does a good job of portraying some of the people and objects with symbols and allows the story to become more developed. Nathaniel Hawthorne uses many people as symbols throughout “Young Goodman Brown,” but the roles that are most symbolic are those of Goodman Brown and his wife Faith. Both of…

Symbols and Symbolism in Young Goodman Brown Essay

eternity. “Young Goodman Brown,” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, reveals a similar resemblance of the Biblical inherent evil among man, through a disturbing dream of a young Puritan man who journeys into evil and is forced to examine the nature of evil among the human race. The Wife of Goodman Brown symbolizes the love that a wife has for her beloved husband but also the love, faith and devotion that her husband Goodman Brown has in his Christian God. An example of this symbolism is when Goodman Brown says…

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Young Goodman Brown Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” is full of symbolism throughout the story. Perhaps the most interesting examples of symbolism include the title character, Young Goodman Brown, as well as his wife, Faith, and the woods that Young Goodman Brown enters on his journey. Included are many allusions to Christianity and also to evil and sin. These references are expressed mainly through characters and settings in the story. The…

The Symbolism of Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

The Symbolism of “Young Goodman Brown” Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story, “Young Goodman Brown,” shows the reader the author’s power as a symbolist. Frederick C. Crews in “The Logic of Compulsion in ‘Roger Malvin’s Burial’” explores the symbology that prevails in Hawthorne’s best short stories: . . . I chose this one tale to analyze because it illustrates the indispensability, and I should even say the priority, of understanding the literal psychological dramas…

Symbolism in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay examples

Nathaniel Hawthorne’s tale, “Young Goodman Brown,” is rich in symbolism, as this essay will amply illustrate. Hugo McPherson in “Hawthorne’s Use of Mythology” explains how the author’s “inner drama” may be expressed in his symbolism: The imaginative foundation of a writer’s work may well be an inner drama or ‘hidden life’ in which his deepest interests and conflicts are transformed into images or characters; and through the symbolic play of these creations, he comes to ‘know’ the meaning…

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Young Goodman Brown Nathaniel Hawthorne utilizes symbolism throughout his short story Young Goodman Brown to impact and clarify the theme of good people sometimes doing bad things. Hawthorne uses a variety of light and dark imagery, names, and people to illustrate irony and different translations. Young Goodman Brown is a story about a man who comes to terms with the reality that people are imperfect and flawed and then dies a bitter death from the enlightenment…

The Use of Symbolism in Young Goodman Brown Essay

“The Use of Symbolism in Young Goodman Brown” “Young Goodman Brown,” written by Nathaniel Hawthorne in 1835, is a short story about a man named young Goodman Brown who leaves his wife, Faith, to go on an errand into the woods with the devil. Faith begs Goodman Brown to not leave her alone, but he chooses to go anyways. This short story shows many signs of symbolism, such as the forest, the devil, the staff, the pink ribbons, Faith, sin, and guilt. These symbols help in understanding the story…

Young Goodman Brown Essay(Symbolism)

IBEnglish III 13 September 2011 “Young Goodman Brown” Analysis One of the factors that shaped the New World was religion; it was a pillar in the fledgling society and a reason for migration for so many Europeans. Puritanism was a major belief system that held strongly throughout the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. Nathaniel Hawthorne, a nineteenth century American novelist and short story writer, composed the story of “Young Goodman Brown” which takes place in Salem. All…

Symbolism in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

Symbolism in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay example

In Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” the use of symbols contributes to the development of the story’s plot. Symbolism is used as a means to uncover the truth about the characters. The author, in an attempt to manifest the moral aspects of his society, uses many kinds of symbols to support his points. When analyzing an allegory like “Young Goodman Brown”, the reader must realize that the story is in its entirety, a symbol. Hawthorne, through his writing is trying to convey the contradicting…

Symbolism,Characterization, and Faith in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown

Symbolism,Characterization, and Faith in Young Goodman Brown Faith is believing what you can’t see or touch. Faith is knowing something especially when there is no proof to back it up. “Young Goodman Brown” is a story about a man who leaves his wife, Faith, home alone for a night while he journeys with the devil down the road of temptation. During the course of his journey, the man sees many people who seem out of place, including his wife. When he returns home to Salem, he is a changed…

Symbolism and Allegory in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

The main characters in Hawthorne’s story “Young Goodman Brown” are Goodman Brown, his wife Faith and the stranger who accompanies Goodman Brown in the forest. At the beginning of the story Brown is bidding his wife, Faith farewell at their front door. Taking a lonely route into the forest, he meets an older man who bears a fatherly resemblance to both Brown and the Devil. Later that night Brown discovers to his amazement, that many exemplary villagers are on the same path including, Goody…

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Young Goodman Brown Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” is full of symbolism throughout the story. Perhaps the most interesting examples of symbolism include the title character, Young Goodman Brown, as well as his wife, Faith, and the woods that Young Goodman Brown enters on his journey. Included are many allusions to Christianity and also to evil and sin. These references are expressed mainly through characters and settings in the story. The…

Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown and Transcendentalism Essay

“Young Goodman Brown” and Transcendentalism A reading of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” indicates that the author adheres to some, but not all of the Transcendentalist beliefs of the nineteenth century, especially in its symbolism and in its emphasis on personal responsibility. Morse Peckham in “The Development of Hawthorne’s Romanticism”explains some aspects of Hawthorne’s Transcendentalist beliefs: But another theme begins to appear, a matter…

The Symbolism of Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

The Symbolism of “Young Goodman Brown” Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story, “Young Goodman Brown,” shows the reader the author’s power as a symbolist. Frederick C. Crews in “The Logic of Compulsion in ‘Roger Malvin’s Burial’” explores the symbology that prevails in Hawthorne’s best short stories: . . . I chose this one tale to analyze because it illustrates the indispensability, and I should even say the priority, of understanding the literal psychological dramas…

Symbolism in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay examples

Nathaniel Hawthorne’s tale, “Young Goodman Brown,” is rich in symbolism, as this essay will amply illustrate. Hugo McPherson in “Hawthorne’s Use of Mythology” explains how the author’s “inner drama” may be expressed in his symbolism: The imaginative foundation of a writer’s work may well be an inner drama or ‘hidden life’ in which his deepest interests and conflicts are transformed into images or characters; and through the symbolic play of these creations, he comes to ‘know’ the meaning…

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

Symbolism in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Young Goodman Brown Nathaniel Hawthorne utilizes symbolism throughout his short story Young Goodman Brown to impact and clarify the theme of good people sometimes doing bad things. Hawthorne uses a variety of light and dark imagery, names, and people to illustrate irony and different translations. Young Goodman Brown is a story about a man who comes to terms with the reality that people are imperfect and flawed and then dies a bitter death from the enlightenment…

Young Goodman Brown Essay(Symbolism)

IBEnglish III 13 September 2011 “Young Goodman Brown” Analysis One of the factors that shaped the New World was religion; it was a pillar in the fledgling society and a reason for migration for so many Europeans. Puritanism was a major belief system that held strongly throughout the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. Nathaniel Hawthorne, a nineteenth century American novelist and short story writer, composed the story of “Young Goodman Brown” which takes place in Salem. All…

Symbolism in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown Essay

Symbolism in Young Goodman Brown Edmund Fuller and B. Jo Kinnick in “Stories Derived from New England Living” state: “Hawthorne’s unique gift was for the creation of strongly symbolic stories which touch the deepest roots of man’s moral nature” (31). It is the purpose of this essay to explore the main symbolism contained within Nathaniel Hawthorne’s tale, “Young Goodman Brown.” Stanley T. Williams in “Hawthorne’s Puritan Mind” states that the author was forever “perfecting…

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The Use of Symbolism in Young Goodman Brown

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Have you ever noticed the symbols an author uses? Do you ever wonder how one symbol or metaphor can affect the entire reading? Nathaniel Hawthorne uses a numerous amount of symbols in all his writings; “The Sister-Years,” “The Haunted Mind,” “The Great Stone Face,” etc. The symbols used in “Young Goodman Brown” are very effective and well executed. Symbols can mean many things, but most importantly, these symbols allow the reader to conduct a study and conclude many things about the characters and the story in general. In “Young Goodman Brown” Nathaniel Hawthorne uses name, color, and title/positioning to depict and symbolize the characters as well as their circumstance.

To start off with, Nathaniel Hawthorne uses names as a symbol. Nathaniel Hawthorne uses names to allow the reader to make an assumption of the character or have a general gist of their profile. The first character that can be depicted by their name is Goodman Brown. Goodman Brown is the main character who is said to be a religious man and come from a very religious family. The name Goodman Brown itself is used as a symbol. They have a good name in their village and are well respected. Goodman Brown is supposed to be a man of righteousness and follow god’s orders, just as his ancestors. The name is meant to portray Brown as a good man, hence Goodman Brown. This allows the reader to assume that Brown is a good civilian with profound morals. This is later contrasted when he meets with the devil and questions religion and life itself. Another character whose name can be viewed as a symbol is Faith, Goodman’s wife. The name Faith shows the good and the prosperity in their marriage. The name itself is used to portray the trust and love, in not only their marriage, but their village. Faith means the belief in the existence of God: strong religious feelings or beliefs, a system of religious beliefs (Webster). Faith is later questioned by her husband Go.

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